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mpufer Systems 
00 to $6000 



rGames •Telecommunications 
rHome and Family * Dial-up Networks 

ow they work 
SUBBLE MEMORY ICs 

iiildthe 



PLUS: 



•Hobby Corner 
•Service Clinic 
•Communication Corner 





£ H Boker 

Crescent 
™ Lufkin 

Nicholson 

Pluml) 

WellerJWiss 

Xcelite s 




Take a good look round this ad and 
you'll agree that "All together" is no 
exaggeration. Whether you're making 
or mending, cutting or joining, striking, 
measuring or stripping, there's a Cooper 
tool that's just right for the job. Don't take 
chances on tools. Specify Cooper 
and get 'em right the first time! 



Plumb 



The Cooper Group PO Box 728 Apex NC 27502 USA Tel (919) 362-7510 Telex 579497 



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CoooerTools 



CIRCLE 8 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



The best 60MHz scope 
costs only $1100. 
It's from Kikusui. 




That's right Only $1100 for Kikusui's top-of-the-!ine 5060 model oscilloscope. And we also have 
four other scopes for as low as $600 in our new 5000 Series. 

Not only that, we're offering a two year warranty on each of them, compared to other big 
name companies' limited one year warranties. 

When it comes to performance, our 5000 Series has the edge over the Tektronix 2200 Series 
in lab quality, chop frequency, and trigger view. Ours also have more display modes, higher 
acceleration for better brightness, and sharper focus for better resolution. 

Each scope in our 5000 Series is crafted so that it can be used for production, field service, 
consumer electronics servicing, or even personal use. The 5060 is a 60MHz scope with 3 chan- 
nels, eight traces, delayed sweep, delay line and alternate sweep, and priced at $1 1 00. Models 
5040 and 5041 are 40MHz, dual channel scopes, featuring peak-to-peak automatic trigger- 
ing, automatic focus control and a delay line. If you're interested in a 20MHz scope, we have 
our 5020 and 5021 models with features similar to our 40MHz scopes. Both the 5041 and 5021 
also have delayed sweep. Prices at $920 for the 5041, $795 for the 5040, $690 for the 5021 
and $595 for the 5020. So, whatever model suits you best, you can't get a better scope for 
the money. 

Of course, there's a reason we're able to offer these bargains and quality. We're one of the 
biggest manufacturers of scopes in the world, with over 30 years in the business. Another reason 
is KIK's nationwide network of lab quality maintenance facilities. 

Write us and we'll send complete specifications back to you. Or just take a little time to call 
us, Ifs a small price to pay to get big time quality and service. 



Order Toll Free 800-421-5334 



Order Toll Free 
800-421-5334 



(3 Kikusui 



INTERNATIONAL CORR 



17819 S. Flgueroa Street, Gardena Calif, 9Q248 
Phones: Calif., Alaska, Hawaii (213) 515-6432 
TWX 910-346-7648 

^ In Canada call: Interfax Systems. Inc. (514) 366-0392 



V/SA* 



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SucsKkivaf Bum Elecl|wic>Ccip,3-117SSh«(V3Mffl4*gQSh.N(»csy]njJ(u. Kawasaki Oty Japan [044) 4(1-01(1 

CIRCLE 97 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



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CD 

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Why use their flexible discs: 

BASF, Control Data, Dysan, IBM, Kybe, Maxell, 
Nashua, Scotch, Syncom, Verbatim or Wabash 

when you could be using 

MEMOREX 

high quality error free discs? 



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C£ 

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JX 



Product Description 
8" SSSD IBM Compatible (128 B/S, 26 Sectors) 
8" SSSD Shugart Compatible, 32 Hard Sector 
8" SSSD CPT 8000 Compatible, Soft Sector 
8" SSDD IBM Compatible (128 B/S, 26 Sectors) 
8" DSDD Soft Sector (Unformatted) 
8" DSDD Soft Sector (128 B/S, 26 Sectors) 
8" DSDD Soft Sector (256 B/S, 26 Sectors) 
8" DSDD Soft Sector (51 2 B/S, 15 Sectors) 
8" DSDD Soft Sector (1024 B/S, 8 Sectors) 
5%" SSDD Soft Sector w/Hub Ring 
5W SSDD 10 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 
5 1 A" SSDD 16 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 
5Y4" DSDD Soft Sector w/Hub Ring 
5W DSDD 10 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 
SW DSDD 16 Hard Sector w/Hub Ring 
5 1 /4" SSDD Soft Sector w/Hub Ring (96 TPI) 
5%" DSDD Soft Sector w/Hub Ring (96 TPI) 

SSSD = Singh Sided Singh Density; SSDD = Single Sided Double Density 
DSDD — Double Sided Double Density; TPt = Tracks per inch 

Memorex Flexible Discs.. .The Ultimate in Memory Excellence 



Free Memorex Mini-Disc Otter - Save 10% 
Every carton of 1 Me morex 5 1 /* 1 nch rn in t- discs sold by 
Communications Electronics, now has a coupon good 
for e trea Memorex mini-disc- For every case of 100 
Memorsxmini-discsyou buy from CE, you'll get lOfree 
mini- discs directly from Memorex, There is no limit to 
the number of discs you can purchase on this special 
offer. This offer is good only in the U.S.A. and ends on 
December 31, 1982. 

Quality 

Memorex means quality products that you can depend 
on. Quality control at Memorex means starting with the 
best materials available and continual surveillance 
throughout the entire manufacturing process- The ben- 
efit of Memorex's years of experience in magnetic 
media production, resulting, for instance, in proprietary 
coating formulations. The most sophisticated testing 
procedures you'll find anywhere in the business. 

100 Percent Error Free 

Each and every Memorex Flexible Disc Is certified to be 
1 00 percent error free. Eacn track of eacft flexible disc 
is tested, individually to Memorex's stringent standards 
of excellence. They test signal amplitude, resolution, 
low-pass modulation, overwrite, missing pulse error 
and extra pu I se e rror. R i gid qua I ity a u rjits are built i n to 
every step of the manufacturing process and stringent 
testing result in a standard of excellence that assures 
you, our customer, of a quality product designed for 
increased reliability and consistent top performance. 

Customer Oriented Packaging 
The desk-top box contain Fng ten discs is conven Ee nt for 
filing and storage. Both box labels and jacket labels 
provide full information on compatibility, density, sec- 
toring, and record length. Envelopes with multi-lan- 
guage care and handling instructions and and color- 
coded removable labels are included. A write-protect 
feature is available to provide data security. 

Full One Year Warranty— Your Assurance of Quality 

M e more?. F I e>: i b I e Discs w i 1 1 b e replaced f re a of cha rge 
by Memorex if they are found to be defective in materials 
or workmanship within one year of the date of purchase. 
Other than replacement, Memorex will not be respon- 
sible for a ny d a mag as or losses ( i n cludi ng consequential 
damages) caused by the use of Memorex Flexible 
Discs. 



Part# 


CE quant. 

10O price 
per disc (S) 


3062 


2.09 


3015 


2.09 


3045 


2.99 


3090 


2.74 


3102 


3.34 


3115 


3.34 


3103 


3.34 


3114 


3.34 


3104 


3.34 


3481 


2.34 


3483 


2.34 


3485 


2.34 


3491 


3.09 


3493 


3.09 


3495 


3.09 


3504 


2.99 


3501 


3.99 



Quantity Discounts Available 

Memorex Flexible Discs are packed to discs to a carton 
and 1 cartons to a case. Please order only in Increments 
ol 1 00 units for quantity 100 pricing We are also willing to 
accommodate your smaller orders. Quantities leas than 
100 units are available in Increments of 10 units at a 10% 
surcharge. Quantity discounts ore also available. Order 
500 or more discs at the same time and deduct 1%; 1 ,000 
or more saves you 2%; 2,000 or more saves you 3%; 5,000 
or more saves you 4%; 1 0,000 or more saves you 5%; 
25,000 or more saves you 6%; 50,000 or more saves you 
7% and 1 00,000 or more discs earns you an s* discount 
off ou r &u per I c-w ojuan trty 1 00 price. Al rn est al I M emo rex 
Flexible Discs are immediately available from CE. Our 
warehouse facilities are equipped to help us get you the 
quality product you need, when you need It If you need 
further assistance to find the flexible disc that's right for 
yoa, call the Memorex compatibility hotline. Dial toll-tree 
&OO-53S-80S0 and ask tor tft&U&xihiB disc tiottifie extension 
0997. In California dial 800-672-3525 extension 0997. 
Outside the USA dial 408-987-0997. 
Buy with Confidence 

To get the fastest delivery from CE of your Memorex 
Flexible Discs, send or phone your order directly to our 
Computer Products Division. Be sure to calculate your 
price using the CE prices In this ad. Michigan residents 
please add 4% sales tax. Written purchase orders are 
accepted from approved government agencies and most 
well rated firms at a 30% surcharge for net 30 billing. All 
sales are subject to availability, acceptance and verification. 
All sales are final. Prices, terms and specifications are 
subject to change without notice. Out of stock Items will be 
placed on bacho rd e r auto matical ly u nless C E is i nstructed 
differently. Minimum prepaid order S 5 0.00. Minimum 
purchase order S 200,00. International orders are Invited 
with a $20.00 surcharge for special handling in addition to 
shipping charges. All shipments are F.Q.B. Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, No COO's please. Non-cert tiled and Foreign 
checks require bank clearance. 

Mail orders to: Communication* Electronic*, Box 1002, 
Ann Arbor. Michigan 481 06 U.S. A Add $8.00 per case or 
partial-case of 100 B-inch discs or 56.00 per case or partial 
case of 100 5Vi-inch minhotacs lorU.P.S, ground shipping and 
handling in the continental U.S.A. IF you have a MasterCard or 
Visa card, you may call anytime and place a credit card order. 
Order toll-free In the U.S. Dial 800-521-4414. IF you are 
outside I he U . S. or in M Ichigan. dial 31 3-394-4444. QFdor your 
high quality, error Iree Memorex discs today. 

CIRCLE 14 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Free disc offer 
Save 10% 






V/SA 



o< 



Order Toil-Free! 
{800)521-4414 

In Michigan (313) 994-4444 




For Data Reliability— Memorex Flexible Discs 



a 



COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS 1 " 

Computer Products Division 

854 Phoenix □ Bo* 1002 D Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 U.S.A. 
C«ll TOLL-FBEE (BOO) S21-441 4 or outlid. U.S.A. (S1 3) Sm-4444 




Electronics 

Electronics publishers since 1908 



THE MAGAZINE FOR NEW 
IDEAS IN ELECTRONICS 



October 1982 Vol. 53 No. 10 



SPECIAL FEATURE 



43 YOUR OWN COMPUTER: HARDWARE, Marc Stern 

45 S 100-5500 85 $2500-3000 

53 S500-S1000 91 $3000-53500 

60 S1Q00-S150O 97 $3500-54000 

73 S1500-S2000 104 S4000-S450O 

78 S2000-S2500 106 S4500-S6000 

111 8 Bits vs. 16 Bits, Josef Bernard 

YOUR OWN COMPUTER: SOFTWARE, Herb Friedman 

113 Games and Leisure Time 

122 Software for the Home 

1Z7 Telecommunications 

131 Dial-up Software Networks 



BUILD THIS 135 PICTURE PHONE 

Pari 3. Winding up the theory arid beginning construction. 
Josef Bernard 



TECHNOLOGY 



CIRCUITS AND 
COMPONENTS 



4 VIDEO ELECTRONICS 

Tomorrow's news and technology in this quickly changing industry. 
David Lachenbruch 

14 SATELLITE TV NEWS 

The latest happenings in communications technology. 
Gary H. Arlen 

148 STATE OF SOLID STATE 

A low-distortion, high-output op-amp. Robert F, Scott 

39 BUBBLE MEMORIES 

How those high-density storage devices work Robert F. Scott 

143 NEW IDEAS 
DMM add-on. 

144 HOBBY CORNER 

Audio oscillator contest results. Earl "Doc" Savage, K4SDS 



VIDEO 150 SERVICE CLINIC 

Derating components. Jack Darr 

152 SERVICE QUESTIONS 

R-E' Service Editor solves technicians' problems. 
Jack Darr 



RADIO 



146 COMMUNICATIONS CORNER 

Reading the mail. Herb Friedman 



EQUIPMENT 28 Weston 65D0-series DMM's 

REPORTS 32 Radio Shack Micronta Microwave- Leakage Detector 



DEPARTMENTS 



12 Advertising and Sales Offices 

185 Advertising Index 

158 Books 

12 Editorial 

187 Free Information Card 



22 Letters 

160 Market Center 

152 New Products 

6 What's News 



ON THE COVER 

Microcomputers — for the home and 
for business— come in all sizes and 
prices. You can pay as little as $1 00 
{or less!) or as much as $6000 {or 
more). To help you make an in- 
telligent choice in selecting a com- 
puter that meets both your needs 
and your budget, our Special Sec- 
tion, "Your Own Computer," groups 
computers and computer systems 
by price. Also included are de- 
scriptions of software and services 
that you may find useful. And, to 
round things out, there's a discus- 
sion of 8-bit vs. 16-bit computers. 
"Your Own Computer" starts on 
page 43. 




»-Eimi '>■,£ 



BUBBLE MEMORIES COMBINE the read write 
features of RAM with the non-volatility of ROM, 
and approach tape and disk systems in storage 
capacity. Find out how they work and how 
they're used starting on page 39. 




EPOXY 

TBANSlSrOH 
CASE 



DERATING CIRCUIT-COMPONENTS can extend 
their life and make the equipment In which 
they're used more reliable. This month's Service 
Clinic covers that topic, beginning on page 1 50. 

Due to lack of space we are unable to Include 
Part 2 of the "Heart-a-Mattc" In this Issue. It will 
appear next month. 

Radio-Electronics, (ISSN 0033-7862) Published monthly 
by Gernsback Publications, Inc., 200 Park Avenue South. 
New York. NY 10003. Second-Class Postage Paid at New 
York. N.V. and additional mailing offices. One-year subscrip- 
tion rate: U.S.A. and U.S. possessions. S13.Q0. Canada. 
SI 6. 00. Other countries, 520.50 (cash orders only, payable 
in U.S.A. currency,) Single copies S1. 25. e 1982 by Gerns- 
back Publications. Inc. Alt righls reserved. Printed in U.S.A. 

Subscription Service: Mall all subscription orders, 
changes, correspondence and Posimasler Notices ol un- 
delivered copies (Form 3579) to Radio-Electronics Sub- 
scription Service, Boi 2520. Boulder. CO B0322, 

A stamped self-add resserj envelope must accompany all 
submitted manuscripts and or artwork or photographs if Iheir 
relurn is desired should Ihey be rejected. We disclaim any 
responsibility lor the loss or damage of manuscripts and' or 
artwork or photographs while i n o ur possession or otherwise. 



As a service to readers, Radio-Electronics publishes available plans or information relating to newsworthy products, techniques and scientific end technological developments. 
Because of possible variances in the quality and condition of materials and workmanship used by readers, Radio-Electronics disclaims any responsibility for the safe and proper 
functioning of reader-built projects based upon or from plans or information published in this magazine. 



VIDEO ELECTRONICS 



DAVID LACHENBRUCH 

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 




COMPO 
BOXSCORE 



As I've been predicting the last few months, this is the year for introduction of component TV. 
This fall, nearly a dozen brand names are planning to get into the act — not all of them 
traditional TV makers, by any means. Hi-fi manufacturers are going video, following the lead 
of Fisher, and most of them are choosing the component approach, naturally enough. Even 
such relatively small firms as NAD and Proton are planning video-component outfits, both 
built around the same 19-inch color monitor, the former to sell it through audio dealers, the 
latter at department stores. Jensen, see photo, is entering video in a big way, with both 19- 
and 25-inch monitors, a TV-FM-AM receiver accessory, and one without AM-FM. Pioneer 
also has two screen sizes, and claims that its 25-inch monitor has 400 lines of horizontal 
resolution, the highest promised by any manufacturer. NEC, known in this country primarily 
as a manufacturer of professional video, has color monitors in five screen sizes, along with all 
associated components. Among traditional TV manufacturers, you'll find Mitsubishi, Pan- 
asonic, Sanyo. Teknika, Zenith and, of course. Sony represented in the component sweep- 
stakes. 

There's no agreement on what each video component should include, so there's a wide 
difference in products. In most cases, the remote-control tuner is combined with a switcher as 
a "tuner-controller," but some offer them separately. Monitors can include: (1 ) No audio. (2) 
Mono amplifier and speaker. (3) Mono amplifier and no speaker. (4) Stereo amplifier and no 
speakers. (5) Stereo amplifier and one speaker. (6) Stereo amplifier and two speakers. All, of 
course, have output jacks for separate audio systems. 

Some manufacturers have chosen not to go all the way to components, but to offer products 
which can be used either as components or complete sets. RCA highlights that group, with its 
Selecta Vision line of "monitor-receivers," highlighted by a 25-inch table model which seems 
to be all screen and is smaller than many 19-inch sets. It contains side-firing stereo speakers, 
a tuning pane! jusl above the picture tube (and by infrared remote), and a group of video and 
audio input and output jacks. The remote-control unit activates switching among inputs. 



MINI-VHS "VHS-C" (the "C" stands for compact) is the new name for the controversial mini-VHS 
videocassette system, scheduled for marketing here this fall by JVC and Sharp, and later 
perhaps by others in the VHS group. Developed by JVC and embraced in Japan by all VHS 
manufacturers, the system uses a small casetteof Vs-inch tape not much biggerthan acigaret 
pack, which can be played back through any VHS recorder by using an adaptor that lets it fit in 
the cassette compartment. 

The idea behind all that, of course, is portability — and JVC's VHS-C recorder weighs just 
4.4 pounds and measures a little over 7 x 3 * 8.5 inches. The single-speed portable will sell 
for about $700 here and record for up to 20 minutes on a miniaturized cassette, available for 
about $10. The adaptor—only one is needed to play compact cassettes in a standard VHS 
recorder — will be around $20. Other VHS recorder suppliers are nervous about introducing 
the system in the United States, because the recorder must be priced very close to the tag on 
a full-featured standard VHS portable, and because a new miniature-cassette standard for 
portables is scheduled to be developed for sale in 1 984 or 1 985. So they're going to watch and 
wait— and if the JVC and Sharp minis hit market gold, the others are sure to come in quickly 
with their own brands. R-E 






THE CASE FOR THE TRAVELING 






TEST LAB 



TAKE YOUR 
LABORATORY 
WITH YOU! 



With a wide choice of NLS Test Instruments, you 
can troubleshoot on the spot, use your own 
equipment, and all at your customer's facility. 

Less Downtime for Customers 
No More Worry about Power 

Our test equipment operates on built-in batteries. 
(Remember, hospitals do not allow AC in surgical 
suites... Your only answer is battery-powered 
equipment.) 




PROFOUNDLY PORTABLE! 

As you can see, our test equipment 
actually fits inside an attache-type tool 
case and still leaves room for all your 
tools and schematics, 

With the NLS Traveling Test Lab, you 
can troubleshoot any sophisticated solid 
state circuitry in today's electronic 
world. 

INSTRUMENTS FOR YOUR 
TRAVELING TEST LAB: 

A 30 MHz dual trace oscilloscope 

{MS- 2 30) and 
A 1 function, 20 parameter, 44 

range multimeter (TT20-B) and 
A 60 MHz frequency counter 

(FM-7) and 
A pre-scaler to take the FM-7 out 

to 512 MHz(SC-5)or 
A basic 4 digit multimeter (LM4A) 

or 
The new NLS Tracer (TR-1B). a 

revolutionary signature analyzer 

for troubleshooting in or out of 

circuit with no power applied to 

the circuit. 



WE REST OUR CASE 



CIRCLE 19 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

Non-Linear Systems, Inc. 

Originator of the digital voltmeter. 

Box N, Del Mar, California 92014 Telephone (714) 7551134 TWX 910-322-1132 




WHAT'S NEWS 



IBM introduces new 
videotex for business 

The Series/ 1 Videotex System 
(SVS/1 ) just announced by IBM, is 
a licensed program that enables 
organizations to establish private 
videotex systems to send and re- 
ceive text and graphics. It uses 
standard telephone lines to link 
IBM Personal computers, low- cost 
videotex! terminals, or television 
monitors equipped with special 
adapters to data contained in an 
IBM Series/1 general-purpose 
computer. 

The system is similar in function 
to British Telecom's Prestel sys- 
tem, but includes a number of addi- 
tional features. It uses an 
alphamosaic pattern (one in which 
graphic images are built up of a 
"mosaic" of small rectangular ele- 
ments) to create videotex images. 

The SVS/1 system can store up 
to about 350,000 frames of 
information— each frame consist- 
ing of 24 rows and up to 40 
characters per row — combining 
text and graphics in up to 8 colors. 
It can respond to up to 24 con- 
current callers, or a larger number 
of intermittent ones. 

SVS/1 provides a fast, efficient 
vehicle for businesses to com- 
municate timely information to 
their employees at either central 
sites or remote offices. It can trans- 
mit such material as internal mail, 
budgets, merchandising informa- 



tion, travel schedules, and bulletin- 
board notices, to name a few of its 
possibilities. 

The system provides up to 99 
levels of security to protect sensi- 
tive information. It checks the 
security level of each frame auto- 
matically before displaying it. 

First customer shipments of the 
SVS/1 were scheduled for Decem- 
ber 1 982. The program has a one- 
time license fee of 510,000. 

Cable company offers 
wide range of services 

Owners of multiple-dwelling 
complexes are offered a combina- 
tion of satellite -TV reception and a 
customized videotape viewing 
sen/ice by a Michigan cable com- 
pany, DBC of Brighton. The cluster 
living-complex owner is provided 
with a commercial dish antenna, a 
UHF-VHF master antenna, suit- 
able head-end amplifiers, and a 
videotape player. 

The equipment will make it 
possible to bring in up to eight local 
off-the-air television channels, and 
up to six satellite-delivered chan- 
nels. In addition, equipment and a 
customized videotape viewing 
package that can be matched to 
the needs of the viewers is pro- 
vided. DBC is emphasizing family- 
oriented films, and other kinds of 
family entertainment. The tape 
program will be updated regularly. 

Availability of good TV and 



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FUNCTION PLACEMENT on the Intel 80186 chip. 




videotape programs is not the only 
advantage of a cluster-complex 
owner, DBC president Jim Cassily 
points out: "The very presence of a 
satellite antenna can attract poten- 
tial tenants to a living complex. Re- 
cent surveys of hotel and motel 
owners show a significant increase 
in occupancy rates directly attribut- 
able to the installation of a satellite 
antenna system, in direct view of 
motorists driving by." 

CPU "board on a chip" 
replaces 15-20 IC's 

Intel Corp of Santa Clara, CA. is 
now sampling its new iAPX CPU 
(80 1 86) , a single chip that contains 
a 16-bit CPU plus all the other 
functions commonly found in a 
single-board CPU subsystem. The 
80186, says Intel, can take the 
place of 1 5 to 20 individual IC's and 
thus offer a lower-cost and higher- 
performance solution for such 
cost-sensitive devices as personal 
computers, word processors, 
small business computers and in- 
telligent terminals. 

The 8081 6 is housed in a 68-pin, 



leadless Jedec type-A hermetic 
chip carrier. It requires a 5-volt- 
only power supply. The in- 
troductory price is $50 each in 
quantities of 100. Production 
quantities are schedules for the 
first quarter of 1 983. It is expected 
that the price will drop below $30 in 
the first year of production. 

Future electric auto to 
operate on AC? 

The Research and Develop- 
ment Center of General Electric is 
now working on $3.1 million sub- 
contract from Ford for research 
and development of a power train 
for electric vehicles. The research 
is aimed at developing a system 
that uses an AC motor instead of 
the DC type normally associated 
with electric cars. 

The power train will include the 
AC induction motor and an auto- 
matic transaxle (transmission and 
gears) integrated in a common 
housing on the front wheel axis. A 
common oil system will both lubri- 
cate and cool the equipment. An 
continued on page 10 




TEK 2200 



MULTI-PURPOSE 
OSCILLOSCOPES 



THE PERFORMANCE/ 
PRICE STANDARD 



Now! A 60 MHz Tektronix scope 
built for your bench. 




In 30 years of Tektronix oscil- 
loscope leadership, no other 
scopes have recorded the 
immediate popular appeal of 
the Tek 2200 Series. The Tek 2213 
and 2215 are unapproached for the 
performance and reliability they 
offer at a surprisingly affordable 
price. 

There's no compromise with 
Tektronix quality: The low cost is the 
result of a new design concept that 
cut mechanical parts by 65%, Cut 
cabling by 90%. Virtually eliminated 
board electrical connectors. And 
obviated the usual cooling fan. 



Yet performance is written all over 
the front panels. There's the band- 
width for digital and analog circuits. 
The sensitivity for low signal mea- 
surements. The sweep speeds for 
fast logic families. And delayed 
sweep for fast, accurate timing 
measurements. 

The cost: $1100 for the 2213*. 
$1400 for the dual time base 2215. 

You can order, or obtain more 
information, through the Tektronix 
National Marketing Center, where 
technical personnel can answer 
your questions and expedite 
delivery: Your direct order includes 



probes, operating manuals, 15- 
day return policy and full Tektronix 
warranty. 

For a demonstration stop by your 
local Tektronix Sales Office. 



ORDER TOLL FREE 

1-800-426-2200 

Ask for Department J01 38 

In the state of Washington, 
Call (206) 253-5353 collect. 



■price FO B Beaverton, OR 



Tfektronix 



o 
o 



COMMOTED TO EXCELLENCE ^ 

m 
to 

CO 



Copyright© 1982 Teklronix. Inc. All rights reserved. 135 



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IN KEY$ NOT 



Introducing the 
Sinclair ZX81. 

If you're ever 
going to buy a personal 
computer, now is the time 
to do it. 

The Sinclair ZX81 
is the most powerful, yet 
easy-to-use computer 
ever offered for any- 
where near the price: 
only $99.95* completely assembled. 

Don't let the price fool you. The ZX81 has 
just about everything you could ask for in a per- 
sonal computer. 
A breakthrough in personal computers. 

The ZX81 is a major advance over the origi- 
nal Sinclair ZX80-the first personal computer to 
break the price barrier at $200. 

In fact, the ZX81 's 8K extended BASIC offers 
features found only on computers costing two or 
three times as much. 

Just look at what you get: 
■ Continuous display, including moving graphics 

Sine 
und 



THE $99.95 







■ Multi-dimensional 
string and numerical arrays 

■ Mathematical and scien- 
tific functions accurate to 
8 decimal places 
■ Unique one-touch entry 
of key words like PRINT, 
RUN and LIST 

■ Automatic syntax error 
. detection and easy editing 

■ Randomize function 
useful for both games and serious applications 

■ 1 K of memory expandable to 16K 

■ A comprehensive programming guide and 
operating manual 

The 2X81 is also very convenient to use. It 
hooks up to any television set to produce a clear 
32-coiumn by 24-line display. It comes with a 
comprehensive programming guide and oper- 
ating manual designed for both beginners and 
experienced computer users. And you can use 
a regular cassette recorder to store and 
recall programs by name. 



Sinclair technology is also available in Ti m ex/Si ndair computers 
under a license from Sinclair Research Ltd. 




Order at no risk.** 

We'll give you 10 days to try out the ZX81 . If 
you're not completely satisfied, just return it to 
Sinclair Research and we'll give you a full refund. 

And if you have a problem with your ZX81, 
send it to Sinclair Research within 90 days and 
we'll repair or replace it at no charge. 
Introducing the ZX81 kit. 

If you really want to save money, and you 
enjoy building electronic kits, you can order the 
ZX81 in kit form for the incredible price of just 
$79.95.* It's the same, full-featured computer, 
only you put it together yourself. We'll send com- 
plete, easy-to-follow instructions on how you can 
assemble your ZX81 in just a few hours. All you 
have to supply is the soldering iron. 
A leader in microelectronics. 

The ZX81 represents the latest technology in 
microelectronics. More than 10,000 are sold 
every week. In fact, the ZX81 is the fastest selling 
personal computer in the world. 

We urge you to place your order for the 
ZX81 today. 
To order. 

To order, simply call toll 
free. Or use the coupon below. 
Remember, you can try it for 
10 days at no risk.** The sooner 
you order, the sooner you can 
start enjoying your own 
computer. 
Call toll free 800-543-3000. 

Ask for operator #509. 
In Ohio call: 800-582-1364; 
in Canada call: 513-729-4300. 
Ask for operator #509. Phones 
open 24 hours a day, 7 days 
a week. Have your MasterCard 
or VISA ready. 



These numbers are for orders only If you just 
want information, please write: Sinclair Research 
Ltd., 2 Sinclair Plaza, Nashua, NH 03061. 

• Plus shippi rig and handli ng Price i ndudw connectors far TV and cassette , AC ada plor, and 

FREE manual 

"Doe not apply to ZXSI tits 




NEW SOFTWARE: Sinclair has 
published pre-recorded pro- 
grams on cassettes for your 
ZX81 . We're constantly coming 
out with new programs, so we'll 
send you our latest software 
catalog with your computer. 



16K MEMORY MODULE: Like 

any powerful, fuil fledged com- 
puter, the ZX81 is expandable. 
Sinclair's 1 6K memory module 
plugs right onto the back of 
yourZXSLCostis $49.95, plus 
shipping and handling. 



inczlair- 

To order call toll free: 800-543-3000 







Price* 








Ad Code A0RE" 


Qty. Amount 




ZX81 


$99.95 








ZX81 Kit 


79.95 








16K Memory Module 


49.95 








Shipping and Handling 


4.95 




$4.95 




MAIL TO: Sinclair Research Ltd., 
One Sinclair Plaza, Nashua, NH 03061 

Namp 




TOTAL 








Ar~IHrp<;<; 






City 


9tate 7tp 




WHAT'S NEWS 



continued from page 6 



advanced high-power, light-weight 
and compact inverter will convert 
the DC energy from the batteries to 
AC. 

The high cost of such an inverter 
has long been a stumbling block in 
the way of using the many advan- 
tages of AC motors in electric vehi- 
cles, GE believes it can use its ex- 
perience in high-powered transis- 
tors and integrated circuits to over- 
come the cost obstacle- 
Ford , the prime contractor under 
a program of the U.S. Department 
of Energy, will manage the overall 
program, as well as design the 
power train, transaxle, and the 
microprocessor-based vehicle 
control system. GE will design and 
build the motor, the transistorized 
power inverter and the drive con- 
trol (the electronic package that 
controls the motor and inverter.) 

The program calls for delivery of 
two experimental power trains to 
DOE/NASA in the spring oi 1 985. 
One will be installed in a Ford Es- 
cort for road test — the other used 
for bench tests at NASA's Lewis 
Research Center. 

New discmaking process 

developed by Philips 

A completely new technique for 
mass-producing video recording 
discs is now being used by the 
Philips LaserVision system, in its 
videodisc factory in Blackburn, 
England. A liquid organic lacquer 
is poured into a mold that contains 
the video and audio information in 
the form of small projections on a 
disc face. It is then exposed to light 
and the lacquer hardens, with the 
audio and video information trans- 
ferred to it in the form of small pits. 
The "photopolymerization" (2P) 
process was devised at Philips Re- 
search labs in Eindhoven (Nether- 
lands). 

Special efforts were necessry to 
adapt the new technique to mass 
production. Production molds are 
made in a number of steps from a 
master disc, much as in earlier 
forms of disc record manufacture. 
A few milliliters of the 2P lacquer is 
poured into the center of the pro- 
duction mold. A transparent piastic 
disc (the substrate of the video 
disc) is placed on it. It is then 
pressed flat against the production 
mold, spreading the layer in a thin 
fluid coating that lies between the 




MANUFACTURE OF LASERVISION VIDEO DISCS in the Blackburn (U.K.) 
factory. 



substrate and the mold. 

The lacquer is then exposed — 
through the piastic substrate — to 
ultraviolet light, which polymerizes 
(hardens) it. A reflective aluminum 
layer is evaporated on the layer of 
lacquer, and a protective layer 
placed on top of that. Then the pro- 
tective layers of two discs are 
bonded together. That produces a 
double-sided disc, playable 
through and protected by the 
transparent plastic substrates. 

U.S. AM stations are 
moving fast into stereo 

Following the FCC's decision 
not to select and approve any one 
of the proposed AM stereo broad- 
cast systems, but to let the public 
decide which is best through open 
competition, at least five systems 
(none of which is compatible with 
any of the others) are competing. 
The results may be interesting. 

One result that is already appar- 
ent is that the broadcasters are 
ready for the new development, 
One equipment manufacturer, 
Harris Corp of Quincy, IL, reports 
over 100 firm orders for stereo 



broadcast equipment by last April 
7. Nearly half of them were picked 
up during the four days of the 
National Association of Broadcast- 
ers convention and show in Dallas 
April 4 to 7. 

Three computer firms 
adopt joint standards 

Standards for the creation and 
transmission of computer graphics 
have been jointly approved and 
adopted by Digital Equipment 
Corp, Intel Corp, and Tektronix Inc. 
The companies plan to incorporate 
the standards into their future pro- 
ducts. 

The standards agreed on are in 
the field of computer-graphics im- 
ages. The first of the two proposed 
standards is the North American 
Presentation Level Protocol Syn- 
tax (NAPLPS). It is a com- 
munications protocol to be used in 
transmitting graphics information. 

The second proposed standard 
is the Virtual Device Interface 
(VDI). It provides standardized ac- 
cess to graphics 'functions that can 
result in improved software 
portability among computer sys- 



tems and graphics devices. 

CBS Columbia forms 
video games unit 

Following a recent agreement 
between CBS and the Bally Mfg. 
Corp., CBS is launching CBS 
Video Games, as a division of its 
toy and games subsidiary, Gabriel 
Industries. 

The agreement gives CBS the 
home videogame and computer 
rights to games that Bally now has 
in development, as well as games 
to be developed or licensed during 
the next four years. CBS plans to 
introduce its first package of three 
or more games — all compatible 
with the Atari Computer System — 
by the end of 1 982. The new divi- 
sion also expects to market games 
for the Mattel I ntelli vision. 



Galvin urges "response" to 
Japan trade policy 

Robert W. Galvin, Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer of Motor- 
ola, told more than 200 electronics 
leaders that American industry 
faces a dual challenge from Japan: 
its ability to dominate certain in- 
dustries worldwide, and a con- 
certed national program to protect 
and promote certain industries so 
that they can achieve such domi- 
nation. 

Speaking before the 7th annual 
Hyannis Conference of the 
Electronic Industries Association 
(ElA) Communications Division, 
he said the United States should 
not accept national industrial polic- 
ies that enable any other country to 
assume a dominant position in the 
U.S. market, and called upon the 
government to identify U.S. in- 
dustries now being targeted by 
Japanese industrial policy, The 
government, he stated, should 
"take any necessary steps to en- 
sure that U.S. industries are not 
placed at a disadvantage in com- 
peting with Japanese firms." 

Citing examples of anti- 
competitive behavior, Galvin said 
the government must: 

1. make targeting by foreign in- 
dustrial policies grounds for trade 
relief; 

2. set market-share ceilings for 
countries engaged in such tar- 
geting; 



10 




BEHIND EVERY 
GOOD SINCLAIR 
IS A MEMOPAK 



If you own a Timex-Sinclair 1000 or 
ZX81 computer, you should have a 
Memopak behind it. From increased 
memory to high resolution graphics, 
Memotech has a Memopak to boost your 
system's capabilities. Every Memopak 
peripheral comes in a black anodised 
aluminum case and is designed to fit 
together in "piggy back" fashion to enable 
you to continue to add on and still keep an 
integrated system look. 



Printer Inlerface'^" ^^ Memopak RAM 
High Resolution Graphics 

Order at no risk 

All Memotech products carry 1 our 10 
day money back guarantee. If you're not 
completely satisfied, return it in ten days 
and we will give you a full refund. 
And every Memotech product comes with a 
six month warranty. Should anything be 
defective with your Memopak, return it to 
us and we will repair or replace it free of 
charge. Dealer inquiries welcome, lb order 
any Memotech product call our toll-free 
number 800/662-0949 or use the order 
coupon. 



gggjogSS 



V|H 



*hH1QPBn] 



CORPORATION 

7550 West Yale Avenue 

Denver, Colorado 80227 

(303) 986-1516 

TWX 910-320-2917 



Tni 


































t Mail to: Memotech Corporation, 7550 West Vale Ave., Denver, CO 80227 ; 
| Cwie:RE - 10 *hto « w 


1 Minus 


H79.9S 








1 ; J>, RAM 


i« « 








| 161 RAM 


».« 








Centronics Pinilei Primer Inertia 


1<M-9S 








j R&31 Pnnier Interface 


15955 








High Resolution Graphics 


144.95 








| Shipping and handling 


19S 






fiJS 


* All prices quoted In U.S. dollars 




Til** 






** Colorado residents please add sales lax 
D Check D MasterCard □ Via 


Total 








Era. 








| Same 


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Memopak 64K RAM The 64K RAM extends the 
memory of your Sinclair by 56K to a full 64K. It 
is directly addressable, user transparent, is 
neither switched nor paged and accepts such 
basic command as 10 DIM A (9000). The 
Memopak 64K turns your Sinclair into a 
powerful computer suitable for business, 
recreational and educational use. No additional 
power supply is required. 

Memopak 32K RAM The 32K RAM Memopak 
offers your Sinclair a full 32K of directly 
addressable RAM. Like the 64K Memopak, it is 
neither switched nor paged and enables you to 
execute sophisticated programs and store large 
data bases. It is also fully compatible with 
Sinclair's or Memotech's 16K PA\1 to give you a 
full 48K of RAM. 

Memopak L6K RAM The Memopak )6K RAM 
provides an economical way to increase the 
capabilities of your Sinclair. And at the same 
time, it enables you to continue to add on other 
features with its "piggy back" connectors. It is 
compatible with the Sinclair 16K or a second 
Memopak 16 K or Memopak 32 K to give 32K or 
48K of RAM respectively, 

Memopak High Resolution Graphics The 
Memopak HRG contains a 2K EPROM monitor 
and is fully programmable for high resolution 
graphics, the HRG provides for up to 192 by 248 
pixel resolution. 

Memopak Printer Interface The memotech 
Centronics parallel or RS232 printer interface 
paks enable your Sinclair to use a wide range of 
compatible printers (major manufacturers' 
printers available through Memotech at 
significant savings). The resident software in the 
units gives the ASCII set of characters. Both 
Memopak printer interfaces provide lower case 
character capabilities. The RS232 Interface is 
also compatible with modems. 

New products coming soon Memotech will 
soon be introducing four new Sinclair 
compatible products: a high quality, direct 
connection keyboard, a digitizing tablet, a 16K 
EPROM and a disk drive. Watch for our future 
advertisements 



EDITORIAL 



Not Another Buyers Guide To Computers! 



I don't consider myself to be an "oldtimer", but I do remember the 
beginning of the "personal computer" revolution. In the beginning, 
there was the July 1974 issue of Radio-Electronics that carried the 
first published construction article for a personal computer built around 
a microprocessor— the Mark 8. That article created quite a stir among 
our readers. Not long afterwards, several companies (actually, they 
were "garage" operations) started introducing commercially available 
computers. Most notable were MITS, Imsai, and Processor Technolo- 
gy- 

The only method for storing programs in those days was to use an 
audio cassette-tape recorder. The bootstrap loader, the program that 
transferred the "operating system" from the tape to the computer, had 
to be loaded manually using front-panel toggle switches. I remember 
seeing a demonstration of the MITS Altair and watching the de- 
monstator's fingers whiz over those toggle switches with lightning 
speed as he entered the bootstrap program. 

Computers have come a long way since then. Today, you can easily 
spend over $10,000 for a personal computer or as little as $79.95. 
You buy from small companies or from large companies. And, just 
when you feel that the market has reached saturation and can't sup- 
port another computer, another one is introduced. 

In confirmation of the vast number of computers that are available, 
this month's buyers guide contains 96 pages. We put that section 
together because we feel that if you are considering purchasing a per- 
sonal computer, and in our reader surveys you tell us that you are, 
then it's imperative that you know what's available before you make a 
decision. That applies not only to the hardware, but to the software as 
well. That is why our buyers guide also includes a comprehensive 
software section as well. 

We did raise the cover price for this issue, but fear not: that price 
will be in effect for only this issue. Also, we do not not intend to be- 
come a computer magazine. Radio-Electronics remains dedicated to 
the broad coverage of the entire electronics industry. 




ART KLEIMAN 
EDITOR 



Electronics 

Hugo Gernsback (1884-1967) founder 

M. Harvey Gernsback, editor-in-chief 

Larry Steckler, GET. publisher 

Arthur Kleiman, editor 

Josef Bernard, K2HUF. technical editor 

Carl Laron, WB2SLR, assistant editor 

Jack Darr, GET, service editor 

Robert F.Scott, semiconductor editor 

Herb Friedman, communications editor 

Gary H. Arlen, contributing editor 

David Lachenbruch, contributing editor 

Earl "Doc" Savage, K4SDS, hobby editor 

Ruby M. Yee, production manager 

Robert A. W. Lowndes, production 
associate 

Stefanie A. Mas, production assistant 

Joan Roman, circulation director 

Ariine R. Fish man, 
advertising coordinator 

Cover photo by Robert Lewis 

Radio-Electronics is indexed in Applied 
Science & Technology Index and Readers 
Guide to Periodical Literature. 



Gernsback Publications. Inc. 
200 Park Ave. S„ New York. NY 10003 
President: M. Harvey Gernsback 
Vice President: Larry Sleekier 

ADVERTISING SALES 212-777-6400 

Larry Steckler 

Publisher 

EAST 

Stanley Levitan 
Radio-Electronics 
200 Park Me South 
New York. NY 10003 
21 2-777-6400 

Ml D WEST/Tex as/Arkansas/Okla. 

Ralph Bergen 

The Ralph Bergen Co.. Inc. 

540 Frontage Road— Suite 325 

Northfield. Illinois 60093 

312-446-1444 

PACIFIC COAST 
Mountain States 
Marvin Green 
Radio-Electronics 
413 So. LaBreaAve. 
Los Angeles. Ca 90036 
213-938-0166-7 

SOUTHEAST 

Paul McGinms 

Paul McGinnis Company 

60 East 42nd Street 

New York. N.Y. 10017 

212-490-1021 



£^OQ£\. 4 




12 



When you need a 
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and works, turn to 
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PhilipsECG 



A North American Philips Company 




You can search high and low for some replacement par 
Or you can turn to the Master— the Sylvania ECG® 
Semiconductor Master Replacement Guide. 

It's called the Master because it's far and away 
the industry's most comprehensive source forget- 
ting the parts you need, when you need diem. 
Including most hard-to-find foreign parts. And 
ECG universal replacement part specifications 
generally exceed the original JEDEC or appli^ 
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Not surpris- 
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With the Master, 
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For your 
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If its ECG,it fits. And it works 



SATELLITE/TELETEXT NEWS 



GARY ARLEN 
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 



NATIONAL 
TELETEXT 




CO 

U 

o 

IT 

6 

_l 

UJ 

O 

Q 



DIRECT 

BROADCAST 

SATELLITES 



NBC and CBS will launch national teletext services, possibly as early as this autumn. The 
start of the services will depend on satisfactory completion" of the teletext rules being 
considered at the FCC and on other business factors, such as availability of TV sets that can 
pick up teletext signals. Technically, both networks will use the North American Broadcast 
Teletext Standard, a hybrid format based on the French Antiope system. 

At the same time that the networks announced their teletext transmission plans, NBC's 
parent company (RCA) revealed its endorsement of the NABTS and indicated that its TV-set 
manufacturing division would being building receivers in that format during the coming year. 
RCA, the largest U.S. TV-set maker, urged early adoption of the standard as the single U.S. 
technical format. 

For the national network service, both networks will develop teletext magazines based on 
their experiences during teletext tests on the stations that both companies own in Los 
Angeles; the year-long trials there included news, sports, and travel and business informa- 
tion, along with games, feature information, and advertising. For the national network service, 
CBS also plans to offer closed-captioning of some prime-time shows. Affiliates will be 
encouraged to develop local teletext inserts (ads and information) as page-creation equip- 
ment and home decoders become available. NBC's service will initially be broadcast by the 
five stations which the network owns (New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington, and 
Cleveland) and by affiliates which want to take part. 

The CBS and NBC plans may be the initiative to start teletext momentum, thus encouraging 
other set-makers to begin building teletext receivers. ABC has stayed away from teletext 
technology altogether, and PBS has been involved with a number of local teletext projects, 
although financial difficulties in the public-broadcasting world probably means that there will 
be little action from that area in the near future, 



Direct Broadcast Satellite service could become available by f 986, thanks to an FCC ruling 
that cleared the way for DBS operators to plow into their plans. The FCC action put the official 
stamp of approval on an earlier Commission ruling that had permitted nine companies with 
DBS plans to proceed with their efforts. 

The latest FCC action is still subject to revision at the 1983 Regional Administrative Radio 
Conference, which will plan the orbit and frequency allocations for DBS in the western 
hemisphere. The Commission's ruling on DBS was considered a landmark, however, be- 
cause it clearly identified satellite TV as a "broadcast" service, yet one which is not subject to 
traditional broadcast requirements such as programming to meet local community needs. 

Administratively, the FCC ruling allocated 500 MHz of spectrum in the 12-GHz band for 
downlinks and 500 MHz of spectrum in the 17-GHz band for uplinks. The FCC declined to 
impose technical standards beyond those required by international agreements, and adopted 
a flexible regulatory approach that will avoid delay in the introduction of DBS and which will 
allow DBS operators to determine the characteristics of their services. There is no require- 
ment that high-definition TV or other enhanced services be included in DBS services — 
although several applicants (including CBS) plan to offer HDTV. 



GOING UP FROM 
NEW YORK 



Q 
< 



Home Box Office is building a new satellite uplink center in suburban New York. The center, 
which will cost as much as S20 million, will replace HBO's current uplink in Vernon Valley, NJ, 
which it leases from RCA. The new Hauppauge. Long Island, center will initially be equipped 
with four 1 1 -meter uplink antennas — the start of an impressive antenna farm. 

At about the same time that HBO announced its uplink plans, another antenna farm in the 
New York area was unveiled. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, in partnership 
with Merrill Lynch & Co.. revealed plans to build Teleport, a $300 million satellite com- 
munications center and office complex on Staten Island, with up to 17 earth stations. 
Business data communications are atop the list of activities, although teleconferences and 
broadcast'cable video transmission are also expected to be beamed through the Teleport 
facilities, which will Include fiber-optic connections. The Staten Island site was selected 
because, although part of New York City, it is just far enough away from the center of town to 
avoid the microwave congestion which clogs and interferes with signals in the crowded 
Manhattan business district- R-E 










Electronics Book Club 

Exciting projects, 
troubleshooting and repair 

tips, and hands-on, 

do-it-yourself info . , . plus 

hundreds of time- and 

money-saving ideas! 




fWj *«TEI "H Oiallms-ns 
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Select 5 fact-filled volumes 

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101 WEEKEND 

ELECTRONICS 

PROJECTS 







7 very good reasons to try 
Electronics Book Club 

Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214 

• Reduced Member Prices, Save up to 75% on books sure to 
increase your know-how 

• Satisfaction Guaranteed. All books returnable within 10 
days without obligation 

■ Club News Bulletins. All about current selections — mains, 
alternates, extras— plus bonus offers. Comes 13 times a year 
with dozens of up-to-the-minute titles you can pick from 

• "Automatic Order." Do nothing, and the Main selection 
will be shipped automatically! But ... if you want an Alter- 
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tions you give on the reply form provided with every News 
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• Continuing Benefits. Get a Dividend Certificate with every 
book purchased after fulfilling membership obligation, and 
qualify for discounts on many other volumes 

■ Bonus Specials. Take advantage of sales, events, and 
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• Exceptional Quality. All books are first-rate publisher's 
editions, filled with useful, up-to-the-minute information 



■:k$k Electron jcs Book Cl jb 

Jj-ff Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214 

Please accept my membership in Electronics Book Club and 
send the 5 volumes circled below, billing me $2.95 plus 
shipping and handling charges. If not satisfied, I may return 
the books within ten days without obligation and have my 
membership cancelled. I agTee to purchase 4 or more books 
at reduced Club prices (plus shipping/handling) during the 
next 12 months, and may resign any time thereafter. 

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or Canada must be prepaid with international money orders in U.S. dollars.} 
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LETTERS 



Address your comments to: Letters, Radio-Electronics, 

200 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10003 



PC BOARDS 

It is difficult for me to express fully my 
appreciation for your magazine. As an 
enthusiastic electronics hobbyist for many 
years, I have always enjoyed your fine arti- 
cles, departments, and projects. Every copy 
is a treasure, full of information; I can't 
remember ever picking up an issue without 
finding at least one project I wanted to build. 

What I am really looking forward to is an 
article on making your own PC boards, photo- 
graphically, from the foil patterns you usually 
provide. I have tried to do so many times, but 
because of limited equipment and "know- 
how," the results have usually been less than 
adequate. Since the materials and chemicals 
used in that process are quite expensive, 
mistakes are usually costly and time- 
consuming, not to mention frustrating. I'm 
sure that I speak for many other readers 
when I say that such an article, or series of 



articles, on the subject would be welcomed 
with open arms! 
P. CONSTAN 
£asf islip, LI 

Please stay tuned! Just such an article will be 
appearing in the very near future. — Editor 



OUT OF PRINT 

First, I want to thank you for the review of 
Buyer's Guide to Video Cassette Recorders 
that appeared in your May 1982 issue. 

Now it is my sad duty to inform you that this 
book has been out of print foY some time, and 
the review has created problems for us. We 
are getting numerous requests for it, as a 
result of the Free Information Card that 
appeared in your magazine. I only wish I had 
the time to answer every request for the book; 
but as I do not, I would only ask that you notify 



your readers of the circumstances: Buyer's 

Guide to Video Cassette Recorders is out of 

print. 

MARTIN L. SCHAMUS, 

Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. 



VIDEO CASSETTE RECORDERS 

I have been thinking about video cassette 
recorders and the fact that government offi- 
cials want them outlawed. I am for those little 
VCR's, and I can't see why there should be 
such a fuss over them. I think that they are 
legal, and I have a bit of information to back 
that opinion up. 

Every American citizen is constitutionally 
guaranteed the right to record signals from 
TV sets. Section 47 of the Communications 
Act of 1 934 states that an American citizen 
has the right to receive any transmission from 
any source. In my opinion, that must include 



o 

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GETTHE SAME VIDEO TRAINING 

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Of course, there's no 
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about the best train- 
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fastest-growing, 
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SONY 

Video Communications 
Sony i i a reg. trademu k of Sony Corp. 



CIRCLE 23 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



just moved down in price, 



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CIRCLE 11 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



RE-1 0-2 I M3J 3A8 (416) 66S8470. 



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the right to record signals from TV sets. 
Those rights have been tested by the Super- 
ior Court of the District of Columbia, and have 
been upheld under the First, Fourth, Fifth, 
Ninth, and Tenth Amendments. 

People record signals from radios every 
day, and the government doesn't say any- 
thing about that. So, until they change it in the 
courts (if they do) everyone should be entitled 
to use video cassette recorders, 
PAUL L. GRAY. JR. 
Colorado Springs, CO 

RADAR DETECTORS 

Being trained as a physicist, and having 
been employed for the Department of De- 
fense since 1962, 1 have amassed more than 



a little knowledge and experience with Dop- 
pler Radar. I have been amused at several of 
the letters concerning traffic radar, especially 
since I was cited in Kansas near Emporia for 
driving at 78 mph in a 1973 Vega SW with two 
cylinders operating so inefficiently that its 
maximumspeedwas54mphonflathighway. 
I was particularly interested in the letter 
from Mr. Richard Kolasinski (Radio- 
Electronics, August 1 982), who says "...but I 
have yet to hear of a radar-detector in car 
being used for any other purpose except to 
avoid getting caught when speeding." I must 
inform Mr. Kolasinki that it is common prac- 
tice for amateurs operating two-meter 
transceivers, and knowledgable Citizen 
Radio Services operators (11 meters) to 
operate radar-warning receivers (RWR) to 
inform them that it is unwise to transmit at a 



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• Six standard RTTY speeds 

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• Adjustable space for fine tuning 

• Receive Morse code — 4 to 50 wpm 

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URBAN A, ILLINOIS 61801 217-367-7373 







specific time while they are being "painted" 
by Doppler Radar, even though they are not 
speeding. That is to avoid getting caught 
when nor speeding, as it has been shown 
numerous times that such transmission will 
heterodyne with the traffic-radar carrier fre- 
quency in the K-band (10.5 - 10.55 GHz). 

He should also be advised that Mr. Rod 
Dornsifs, a former San Diego police officer, 
testified in court at Burlington, KYon January 
17, 1980, that radar equipment and radar 
operators have a 30% error rate (also known 
as false-alarm rate) on a nationwide basis. 
He should also be advised that Dade County 
Judge Alfred F. Nesbitt was cited for driving at 
63 mph during the weekend of July 4, 1982, 
even though his cruise control was set at 55 
mph, and it was his first citation in 45 years of 
driving. Judge Nesbitt convened a court hear- 
ing after he learned that Florida police had 
clocked a speeding banyan tree and a house 
moving at 28 mph during 1 979. Obvious the 
actual target and the intended target were not 
identical, and that problem is one of the de- 
ficiencies of traffic radar systems. Judge Nes- 
bitt's hearing did, in fact, document other in- 
stances of the radar system's fallibility. Eighty 
cases based upon radar evidence were then 
dismissed, and Dade County police are now 
required to support an arrest with evidence 
obtained through pacing. 

If anyone does a large amount of traveling 
via the automobile, it would be prudent to 
equip his or her car with cruise control and an 
RWR of (he superheterodyne type for self- 
defense. 

One might well ask, with respect to the 
"moving" tree or house, just what did the 
radar system measure? First of all, it must 
have been a strong reflector of K-band 
frequencies, such as a metallic surface. Next, 
Doppler systems require that the radar return 
be different from the transmitted carrier by an 
amount equivalent to an audio frequency. 
The calibration test consists of a tuning fork 
oscillating at a frequency usually correspond- 
ing to 60 mph, and the vibration must be in the 
direction of the beam. A roadsign vibrating 
about a vertical axis in a strong wind atso 
provides a good radar return, as does an 
electrical transmission line suspended above 
the roadway, or a nearby windmill rotating in 
the wind and also in the radar beam. 

It is possible that any one of those reflec- 
tors were in the beam directed at the house or 
the tree by the police operator. However, 
since the operator's mind has isolated the 
target, more often than not, that is all that he 
considers as a potential target. Thus, the guilt 
oftentimes cannot be validated "beyond 
resonable doubt" since his eye cannot cor- 
roborate the intended target as the actual 
target. Even if there is only a single vehicle 
within a reasonable distance of, or inside, the 
radar beam , a transmission of a suitable radio 
frequency has been shown to cause a false 
measurement and the interference is unseen 
by the operator. 

There are far too many circumstances for 
even a very accurate system to fail to provide 
a true measurement, let alone the traffic- 
radar systems now on the market and in actu- 
al use. A traffic-radar system could be built 
that would function with as little as a 5% false- 
alarm rate, but such systems would be orders 
of magnitude more expensive than current 
systems, and still might not provide evidence 
"beyond a reasonable doubt" in all courts of 
law. 



24 



CIHCLE 26 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



LB-100 

Lead Bender 
and Crimper 






The new LB-100 component lead bender is 
totally unique in that it also contains a 
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LB-100 handles all common axial 
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CIRCLE 10 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 





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In the defense of my innocence after my 
citation in 1 977, I qualified myself as an ex- 
pert witness and the prosecution acquired the 
services of the gentleman who designed the 
radar system which provided the evidence 
against me, the Kustom Signal, Inc. MR-11. 

I testified to all of the above circumstances 
as being possible, provided a mechanic's 
data as to the condition of the engine in my 
vehicle, and prompted my attorney in his 
eliciting testimony from the arresting Kansas 
State Trooper. What came out was that every 
time the Trooper drove past a particular place 
on a highway, the radar indicated 88 mph 
even when his was the only vehicle within 
seven or eight miles. I, myself, have heard 
sophisticated RWR's sound off and give a 
visual indication of an RF field in the K-band 
capture band with no other vehicles in sight. 
The RF energy is there, but it does not eman- 
ate from traffic radar, 

How could one defend himself in court with- 
out knowing that he had been "painted" and 
taken pains to record and verify his vehicle's 
speed? Possibly Mr. Kolasinski would con- 
clude that the driver is guilty, regardless of the 
circumstances, simply because the radar 
measured a number. At any rate, the de- 
signer of the MR- 1 1 told me later that this was 
the first case of the many that he had had, that 
he had lost! I wonder why. 
J. FRANK FIELDS 
Lawrence, KS 

ENERGY MISER 

In your article entitled "Energy Miser for 
Your Furnace," Radlo-Electronlcs, August 
1982, the equation for the temperature con- 
version is not printed correctly. It should read: 
Temp (in °F) = 1 .8 x Temp ("K) - 459-67 

The factor 1 .8 is equal to the usual conver- 
sion factor of 9/5, as everybody knows. But, 
without the factor in the equation, there may 
be misunderstanding in the text. 

In the description that follows the equation, 
the text mentioned R1 and R2 for water- 
temperature sensor, IC6. As far as the circuit 
diagram is concerned, R1 and R2 are in the 
air-temperature sensor IC5 circuit. You see, 
there is also a little mix-up here. 
H.HSU 

Professor, Department of Engineering, 
Ohio State University R-E 




' 'It's not so bad, but I could get the same 
effect with a synthesizer, ' ' 



CIRCLE 21 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 





Reasons Why 
Your Next 
Hand Held 
DMM 
Should Be... 

SOAR CORP. MODEL 8050 



The Digital 

Measuring Machine 

1 to 9 - $89.95 

10 or more — 376.50 



1. The 8050 has eight separate 

functions (30 ranges) including diode 
and transistor check, 10 ampere ranges 
for both AC and DC current, and a 
continuity test beeper that reacts as 
fast as you can move the test probe 
from one point to another. 

2. Single rotary switch for all func- 
tion/range selections with only 
ONE moving part that provides full 
contact wiping action for long term 
trouble free reliability and accuracy. 
The one year basic DCV accuracy 
starts at 0.5%. 

3. The glass epoxy PCB, low parts 

count, low mass switch assembly, and 
plastic lens LCD cover makethe 8050 
tough inside; yet all critical compon- 
ents and calibration controls have 
been positioned so they are easy and 
quick to "get at" if ever there's a need 
to calibrate or repair. 



4. The case interior is fully RFI/EMI 

shielded so you can make accurate 
measurements even in the presence 
of other "turned on" equipment. 

5. The 8050's physical size (S'A" x 
3V3" x 1") was optimized to allow 
fast sure function/range selection and 
firm one hand holdability; its small 
enough to fit in your shirt pocket; 
ideally sized for you r attache or toof case. 

6. All functions and ranges are over- 
load protected, just in case — and 
we provide a spare fuse, standard 9V 
battery, test leads, and a "no nonsence" 
one year parts and labor warranty. 

7. Our LCD readout has big bold 

"eye pleasing" 3Vi digits with auto- 
matic low battery indicator and minus 
sign, it's readable with one fast gfance. 

8. Its superbly styled in Vs" thick 

rugged ABS plastic, the perfect com- 
bination of beauty and strength. 



9. The8050is made by SOAR CORP., 

one of the largest {if not THE LARGEST) 
manufacturer of hand held DMM's in 
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1 0. PRICE! That's right, the last rea- 
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represents one heck of a value and 
proves once more that good things 
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NORTH AMERICAN SOAR CORP. 

1126 CORNELL AVENUE 
CHERRY HILL, N.J. 08002 
(609) 488-1060 



SOAR products are available through selected 
DISTRIBUTORS in the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico. 
ORDER YOURS NOW. 



NORTH 
AMERICAN 







CIRCLE 16 ON FHEE INFORMATION CARD 



EQUIPMENT REPORTS 




CIRCLE 131 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



BACK IN THE 1930 S. IF YOU OWNED A 

Weston meter you were considered one of 
the elite in the field. A lot of things have 
changed since then, but at least on thing 
has stayed the same — -Weston (6 J 4 Fre- 






linghuysen Ave., Newark, NJ 07114) is 
still turning out some of the finest test 
instruments on the market. One of their 
latest is actually a series of high quality 
DMM's. There are two basic meters in 



this series. They are pretty much identi- 
cal, except that one. the mode! 6502, 
measures average AC. while the other, 
the model 6504, measures true RMS. 

Although those units look almost like 
typical DMM's; they are far from it. They 
do have all of the ranges and scales you 
would expect: DC voltage is measured 
over 5 ranges from 200 milllivolts to 2000 
volts full-scale; the maximum allowable 
DC input- voltage is 1000 volts. Direct 
current is measured over 5 ranges from 
200 microamps to 2000 milliamps full- 
scale. AC voltage is measured over 5 
ranges from 200 millivolts to 2000 volts 
full-scale; the maximum allowable AC 
voltage-input is 750 volts RMS or 1 100- 
volts peak. Alternating current is meas- 
ured over 5 ranges from 200 microamps 
to 2000 milliamps full scale. Finally, re- 
sistance is measured over 6 scales from 
200 ohms to 20 megohms full scale. 



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utor of electronic test equipment, components, prototyping 
Supplies. S- 1 00 and other computer products To receive ouf 
semiannual lull color catalog and our periodic sale flyers, 
please circle I he reader service number to be added lo our 
mailing list 



PRIORITY 




RJHITV509 

50MHz DUAL TRACE WITH 

CALIBRATED VARIABLE DELAY 

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MSI 

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ORDER TOLL FREE (800) 423-5922 - CA, AX, HI CALL (213) 709-5464 

Teims U S, VISA, MC. BAC Ch«V Money Order. U.S. Funds Only. CA residents add 6¥i Sales Tax MINIMUM PREPAID a ROE H SI 5 00 Include MINIMUM 
S H I PPI H G i H A H D LINO cA $1 5.00 I w each oscil toscdpe - us i in case, please i nc lud e you r phatt num&ei Price subject EC cha nge wllluut notice We Wilt do our 
besl to maintain pftces liirough October, 1 9B2 Credit Card orders wilt be charged appropriate freight Hyou haven't received! your Sprang '32 Engineering Selection 
Guide, send SI 00 Ice your copy today 1 Sale prices are ler prepaid orders only 

CIRCLE 22 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




RCA, Philips-ECG and G.E., to name a few. And 
for good reason. 

Only three years ago TCG started out with just ten 
parts in its line. Today we're one of the major success 
stories of the electronics industry, and frankly, the big 
guys are getting more than a little uneasy. 

We've grown so rapidly because we give you more 
of what you re buying the other manufacturer's parts 
for. We test all of our parts extensively on state-of-the-art 
equipment during every phase of production. So you'll 
get more quality and our full, two year replacement war- 
ranty. And, in a time that has seen the other manufacturers 
adding fewer and fewer parts to their catalogs, we've 
added 800 new parts this year alone. 
That's why more and more techni 
clans in the know are turning 
to TCG's Replacement Master 
Guide. It cross references 
over 210,000 different part 
numbers — more than G.E., 
or RCA. 

TCG uses a special com- 
puter controlled inventory 



TCG 



NEW-TONE ELECTRONICS 
TECHNICIAN COMPONENTS GROUP 
44 FARRAND STREET. 
BLOOMFIELO. NJ 070D3 



system, so when you decide to replace or design with 
TCG, you know you'll always be able to find the part you 
need on your distributor's shelf. And TCG replacement 
parts come in either polybags or carton packs with 
device type, rating limits, package diagrams and replace- 
ment equivalents right on the package. So finding the 
correct part for your component has never been easier, 
faster or more convenient. 

No matter what area of electronics you're into, TCG 
replacement semiconductors are the parts for you. 



MAIL TO: 

NEW-TONE ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN COMPONENTS GR OUR 

44 FARRAND STREET. BLOOMFIELO. NEW JERSEY O7O03 

□ PLEASE RUSH ME THE 1982 REPLACEMENT 
MASTER GUIDE. 




I 



(NAME) 



(ADDRESS) 



(CITY) 



(STATE) 



(ZIP) 



CIRCLE 12 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



O 

n 

o 

CD 

m 
jj 

to 

00 

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29 



Range selection and the standard 
DMM functions are controlled by a row 
of paddle-like switches at the bottom of 
the front panel. So far that sounds like an 
ordinary DMM — but wait, there's more. 
This DMM has a microprocessor. 

The microprocessor is used for several 
special-function modes, all of which are 
controlled by two rows of front-panel 
pushbuttons. These pushbuttons are also 
used for entering data as needed in the 
special-function modes. 

The Filter mode inserts a special 
averaging-value filter for reading noisy 
inputs. 

The Scale/Offset mode does just what 
the name implies — it will scale the read- 
ing by a pre-entered amount A, and offset 
it by a pre-entered constant B. Thai is 
useful for such things as measuring the 
output of a transducer or other type of 
sensor, eliminating the need for extra cal- 
culations. 

The Percent-Deviation mode displays 
the percent difference between what is 
measured and a pre-entered constant N . 

The Null mode is used to subtract the 
initial reading from all subsequent read- 
ings. Among the uses for this is to null out 
the resistance of the test leads — that be- 
comes critical when you are working with 
very low resistances. 

When the unit is in the Hi/Lo Limit 
mode, the measured value is compared to 
pre-entered limits stored in the Hi and Lo 



registers. If the value is higher than the 
limit stored in the Hi register, the readout 
will simply display a hi message: if it is 
lower than the value in the Lo register, the 
readout will display a lo message. If the 
measurement falls between the two 
limits, the measurement is displayed as 
usual. 

The Min/Max mode is similar. Here, 
however, the maximum and minimum 
values of a series of measurements are 
stored in registers. Pressing the max but- 
ton recalls the maximum value: pressing 
the min button recalls the minimum 
value. 

Note that more than one of the meter's 
special modes can be used at one time. In 
fact, all of them could be used together if 
desired. When more than one function is 
in use. the order of execution is Filter. 
Null. Scale/Offset, Percent Deviation. 
Max/Min. and Hi/Lo Limit, 

The panel is clearly marked in white 
and yellow. Lines and arrows tell you 
which buttons are used together. White 
markings are used to identify the special- 
function modes and the registers . The yel- 
low markings are used for data-entry 
functions. That is importantisince most of 
the buttons are used for more than one 
purpose, very much like what is done in 
advanced pocket-calculators. The in- 
struction manual gives a very clear and 
thorough explanation of just exactly how 
to set up and use each of the special- 



function modes. From experience. I can 
assure you that it pays to read the book 
carefully first! 

The 4'/:-digil LCD display used also 
provides annunciators that are used to 
identify which of the special function 
modes arc in use. Also, the readout will 
display several prompts, in English, to 
help you along. For instance, when you 
turn on the instrument, a func prompt 
will appear on the display. That prompt 
requests that you enter one of the standard 
functions such as ac volts. Once that is 
done, a rng prompt asks you to enter the 
range desired. If a measurement exceeds 
the entered range, an o.rng (overrange) 
prompt will appear. If the inpul exceeds 
the maximum voltage limits we men- 
tioned earlier, an ouch prompt appears; 
that one is my personal favorite! 

The instruction manual is quite good. It 
tells you just what the instrument can do, 
how it does it. and. most important, how 
uuLcan gei ino perform properly. Read it 
carefully . It includes a full circuit descrip- 
tion, schematics, calibration data, and a 
full parts list. It gives examples of how to 
set up each of the special-function modes. 

Six special probes are available for use 
with these meters. One is an AC clamp-on 
probe for reading AC currents up to 200 
amps. Another is a temperature probe that 
will read temperature directly, in either °F 
or "C. A switch is used to select the de- 
sired scale. A "hold" probe allows you to 




'At ABC's Wide World of Sports we don't 
play games. We use the AWS Digisnap 



"As everyone knows, ABC's Wide World of 
Sports does the finest job of covering sporting 
events for television. The explanation is sim- 
ple: Demand for total perfection. Cameras, 
lighting and sound equipment must always 
be operating at peak performance. All elec- 
trical and electronic hook-ups are checked 
and re-checked. And ii a problem should 
occur, it must be found and corrected - fast. 
That's why ABC technicians rely on the AWS 
Digisnap digital snap-around volt-ohm- 
ammeter for their electrical testing needs. 
Its autoranging feature saves them valuable 
time and its readings are consistantly 
reliable and accurate." 



Outstanding features include: 

■ Autoranging. 

■ Large, 3>/i digit LCD. 

■ 75, 000 hour/rated rechargeable battery 
life. 

■ Up to 75 hours continued use between 
charges. 

■ Peak detector measures current & 
voltage surges. 

■ Overload protection on all ranges. 

■ Tear-drop shape jaw design for 
working in tight areas. 

■ Electronic data lock to freeze reading, 

■ Housed in shock-resistant ABS plastic. 

See us at Wescon booth #1725 



TM W 



William Stone . 
Technical Manager, ABC-TV 



For mare information on the Digisnap 
Model DSA-1000, or any of the other fine 
AWS instruments, caJJ your distributor 
today or contact A.W. Speny instruments 
Inc., P.O. Box 9300, Smitbtown, N.Y. J J 787 
• 800-645-5398 Toll-Froo (N.Y., Hawaii, 
Alaska call collect S1G-231-7Q50). 

A.W. SPERRY 



The Measurable Advantage. 



CIRCLE 24 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Electronics MEM 





THE MEAN LITTLE KIT 

New compact kit of electronic tools. In- 
cludes 7 screwdrivers, adjustable wrench, 2 
pair pliers, wire stripper, knife, alignment tool, 
stainless rule, hex-key set, scissors, 2- 
flexible files, burnisher, soldering iron, solder 
aid, solder and desoldering braid. Highest 
quality padded zipper case. Send check or 
charge Bank-Americard, Mastercharge, or 
American Express. The JTK-6 sells for 
S95, 00— Jensen Tools Inc., P.O. Box 
22030, Tempe, Arizona 85282, (602) 963- 
6231. 

CIRCLE 57 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




UNGAR'S HOT VAC" 4000 the easiest 

most cost effective way to desolder. Unit has 
a quiet contained vacuum source, is light, 
compact, with easy to grasp carrying handle. 
The control switch is located on the 
biomechanically designed handle. System is 
grounded, circuit fully suppresses transient 
spikes. 5399.00— Call your Ungar distributor 
for a demo or contact Ungar, Dlv. of El don 
Ind. Inc., P.O. Box 6005, Compton, CA 
90220, (213) 774-5950 (800) 421-1538. 
CIRCLE 53 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




SHEET METAL WORKER FOR PRO- 
TOTYPES OR LIGHT PRODUCTION - a 24" 

shear, bending brake and roll forming ma- 
chine, 20 gauge mild steel or .060" half-hard 
aluminum. All functions operate sim- 
ultaneously with no special set-ups. A 
thousand machines installed around the 
world, many doing electronic R&D work. For 
special offer contact: PACIFIC ONE 
CORPORATION, 410 West Coast High- 
way, Suite K214, Newport Beach, CA 
92663. (7U) 645-5962, TELEX POC (910) 
497 2059, MHI CORP LSA. 
CIRCLE 55 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




2300 MHz DOWNCONVERTER kit 

for Amateur microwave reception. $37.95 
postpaid. Includes NE 64535 high- 
performance RF stages and highest quality 
components for superior performance. Send 
SASE for information filled catalog of other 
converter kits, preamps, accessories and 
parts. VISA and MASTERCARD accepted. 
SMP - Superior Microwave Products, Inc. 
PO Box 1241 Vienna, VA 22180 

1 -300-368-3028 1 -703-255-291 8 

CIRCLE 51 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




RIFtiDN 

TS-LKYISION 
EDUCATION 



SUBSCRIPTION TELEVISION EDUCA- 
TION MANUAL includes detailed schema- 
tics, theory, and practices: $14.95. MICRO- 
WAVE TELEVISION EDUCATION MAN- 
UAL: $ 1 6,25. Both manuals only $26.95. 1 5.7 
KHz SINE WAVE ACTIVE FILTER KIT in- 
cludes parts and instructions: $22.70. IN- 
FORMATIVE CATALOG on all VIDEO 
PRODUCTS, KITS, and MANUALS: $2.00 
(Refundable). Visa and MasterCard 
accepted. Add 5% shipping and handling. — 
ABEX, P.O. Box 26601 -RS, San Francisco, 
CA 94126. 

CIRCLE 54 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




ULTIMATE UHF FRINGE AREA RECEP- 
TION, receive snow free pay and commercial 
tv signals. The system includes a 1 1 4 ele- 
ment antenna, 39db LNA (Booster) and sig- 
nal extracter for $199.95. Complete 
documentation and warranty. 114 element 
antenna $109.95, 39db LNA (Booster) 
$119.50, signal extracter $39.95. Dealer in- 
quiries welcome. Visa - Mastercard 
accepted. Please specify channels. DX- 
TELE LABS, 3822 H. Paradise Rd., Flag- 
staff, AZ 86001, 502-774-4735. 

CIRCLE 59 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




STOP 




POCKET-SIZED RESISTANCE SUB- 
STITUTION UNIT OFFERS 1% ACCURA- 
CY. Slide switch unit combines pocket-size 
convenience with a range of over 11 million 
resistance steps. Excellent tool for circuit de- 
sign, development instrument repair and 
trouble-shooting. Has 3 binding posts (one 
grounds case). Rugged aluminum case 
assures reliability. From stock at only $58. — 
PHIPPS & BIRD, INC., P.O. BOX 27324, 
RICHMOND, VA 23261 (804) 264-7590. 
CIRCLE 56 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Copy Guard 



Make professional quality duplicates of your 
favorite (VHS, BETA) tapes with this state- 
of-the-art controler. Includes: stabilizer: de- 
feats rolling enhancer: preserves picture de- 
tail at slow speed RF converter: simplifies 
real time viewing distribution amp: drive 3 
VCR's easy to build kit lowest price $1 33.00 
206-693-3834 M/C, Visa order now save 
10%.— Video Control Inc., 3314 H Street. 
Vancouver, WA. 98663. USA 
CIRCLE 52 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 






VIDEO STABILIZERS, The MOD BOX* lets 
you copy any pre-recorded video tapes. 
Hooks between any 2 video recorders and 
stops the roll. Only 39.95. Not shown; MOD 
BOX 2 with Color Brite' adjustment brightens 
color and stabilizes. Only $49.95 (regularly 
$99.95), Also: automatic MOD BOX, No knob 
to adjust Stabilizes only. Now $49.95 (Reg. 
$99.95}.— VIDEO MODS, BOX 2591, Sep- 
ulveda, California 91343 (213) 361-4694. 
Send stamp for quick information. 

CIRCLE 58 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



O 

3 

O 

CD 

m 
JD 

CO 

CO 

to 
31 



"hold" a reading on the display by sim- 
ply pressing a switch on the probe. The 
reading is held until the switch is re- 
leased. An RF voltage probe is used to 
read RF voltages from 10 kHz to 50 MHz, 
with an accuracy of -±5%. The VHF RF 
probe does the same thing for signals 
from 50 kHz to 520 MHz. A high- voltage 
probe extends the DC voltage range up to 
50 kilovolts, with an accuracy of ±29c. 

The model 6500' s are neat and compact 
bench instruments that are small enough 
for portable use. The test probes are stur- 
dy, with protective collars and sharp 
points. The input jacks arc of the type that 
has no exposed bare metal. The model 
6502 lists for S758.00; the model 6504 
lists for 783.00. Three optional versions 
of each model rounds out the 6500 series. 
These options must be selected when you 
purchase the instrument; they cannot be 
added later. The options are: rechargable 
battery-power, BCD output, and a IEEE- 
488 bus interface. 

In summary, these are remarkable 
instruments — they do more things, and 
do them better, than anything else I own! I 
believe that either one would be an asset 
in any laboratory or electronics work- 
shop. 

In the final analysis, these instruments 
are anything but inexpensive. They do, 
however, provide features and measure- 
ments capabilities beyond other in- 
struments in their price range. R-E 



Radio Shack Micronta 

Microwave-Leakage 

Detector 



o 
o 

DC 

$3 



UJ 

o 
< 

EC 
32 




CIRCLE 132 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



R ad io S h ac k Mi c rowa ve Lea ka g e D etec to r 




OVERALL I 






PRICE ■ 


EASE I 








OF USE ■ 


INSTRUCTION I 
MANUAL ■ 










PRICE/ 

/VALUE ■ 










liTzJsTiTsfsl 7 


8 


9 


10 


^S&s^/^ 



A HANDY WARNING DEVICE FOR USE WITH 

microwave ovens is being marketed by 
Radio Shack stores and dealers through- 




"ln Just A Few Days, I'll Show You How To Do 



REAL MATH 



dx 



On Your Calculator!" 



•Quick. 'Guaranteed 
•Easy. •Fun, Too! 



lems you suggest and it always GIVES ME A THRILL 
to see it start out with a wild guess and then approach 
the limit and stop, " 

Professor John A. Ball of Harvard College (author 
of the book 'Algorithms for RPN Calculators') writes: 
immediate refund if you are not astounded at the i wis h I had had as good a calculus course." 

^fe'KllK^SW^S^L. _■.,.___,. Professor H..1 Freedman of the U, of Alberta, 

writing in $oc. Ind. AppL Math Review, states: 
'There can be no question as to the usefulness of this 
book. ..lots of exercises... very clearly written and 
makes for easy reading. " 

Tektronix Engineer Bill Templeton says "CALCU- 
LATOR CALCULUS is the best, most dearly written 
book 1 have seen for improving your math skills." 

[ WANT YOU TO DO THIS. Get my complete 
kit, with a Tl-35 calculator, plus its 200 p. Student 
Math Book, AND the guidebook, ALL for $44.95 
(for shipping to USA add $2, or $5 by AIR; Foreign 
$5, or £10 AIR; in Calif, add 52,70 tax). 

If you already have a scientific calculator, you 
can invest in the guidebook, CALCULATOR 
CALCULUS', for only U.S. $19.95 (to USA or 
foreign: add $1 for shipping, or 54 by AIR; in Calif, 
add SI .20 tax!. 

As pennywtse Ben Franklin said, "An invest- 
ment in knowledge pays the best dividends." GET 
STARTED NOW— Tax deductible for professionals, 

MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE! Send for it to- 
day. Be sure to give me your complete mailing ad- 
dress with your check or money order. If you want 
to charge it (Visa or MC), tell me your card no. and 
exp. date. Prompt 
shipment 
guaranteed. 
Thank you! EduCALC Publications - Dept. D9 

27963 Cabot Road, South Laguna, CA 92677 

For fast service, phone MC or VISA orders 

to (7 14)631-2637 



INTRIGUED BY CALCULATORS? Then you can 
step up your math skills fast! Use my new method in 
guidebook form. Its called CALCULATOR 
CALCULUS. This space-travel spinoff is sure-fire, 
so it has a simple guarantee — just return it for an 



But the point is - you won't want to send it back 
For this is the easiest fastest shortcut ever! The day 
you receive your copy in the mail you'll want to put 
it to work. It's that exciting and helpful, 

My name is Dr. George McCarty. I teach math at 
the University of California. I wrote this guidebook 
to cut through the confusion. I guide you with 
examples you follow step-by-step on your calculator 
— you do simple exercises — then you solve practi- 
cal problems with real precision' 

POWER METHODS. Need to evaluate functions, areas. 
volumes — solve equations — use cvrvrs, (rig. polar coor- 
dinates — find limits for sequences and series? It's all here! 

II you're in the biological, social or physical sciences, 
you'll be doing Bessel. functions, carbon dating. Gompertz' 
growth curves, half-life, hi lure value, marginal costs, 
motion, cooling, probability, pressure — and plenty more 
(even differential equations}. 

Important numerical techniques? Those algorithms are 
here, too: rational and FjdF approximation, bracketing, con- 
tinued tractions, Euler's method, heun's method, iteration 
functions, Newton's method, predictor-corrector, successive 
substitutions, Simpson's method and synthetic division. 

LOOK AT WHAT USERS SAY: Samuel C. 
McGuney, Jr., of Philadelphia writes: 
CALCULATOR CALCULUS IS GREAT! For ten 
years I have been trying to get the theory of calculus 
through my head, using home-study courses. It was 
not until 1 had your book that it became clear what 
the calculus was all about. Now I can go through the 
other books and see what they are trying to do. With 
your book and a calculator the whole idea becomes 
clear in a moment, and is a MOST REFRESHING 
EXPERIENCE, I program some of the iterative prab- 



-£~y~"iu?g~f- \ 



out the country (Radio Shack is a division 
of the Tandy Corp., One Tandy Center, 
Ft. Worth, TX 76102). The device, 
which incidently is not a certification 
instrument, is the Microwave Leakage 
Detector (catalog number 22-200 1 ) and is 
intended for those who wish to keep a 
check on the door seals (and other areas) 
of a microwave oven. 

As pointed out in the instructions sup- 
plied with the unit, new ovens will rarely 
allow any microwave radiation to escape. 
However, as ovens age and the door seals 
begin to wear, harmful radiation may es- 
cape without the user's knowledge. That 
is the value of this unit — it will detect the 
radiation and give a relative indication" 
(acceptable vs. hazardous) of the level. 

The detector is conveniently housed in 
a black plastic case that measures approx- 
imately 5 x 2 x 1 'A inches. The relative 
level of microwave radiation is indicated 
on an edge-reading meter located at one 
end of the case; that end is angled up- 
wards for easy viewing. Acceptable 
radiation levels are indicated by a green 
region while hazardous levels are in- 
dicated by a red one. To test for micro- 
wave leakage, a gray plastic "collector" 
located at the other end of the case is held 
against the door seams of the oven being 
checked and then slid along the seam. Of 
course, the meter should be constantly 
watched to spot any indication of leakage. 

The value of tilting the meter becomes 
obvious when you try the detector out. 
That arrangement allows you to easily see 
the meter without stooping as you slide 
the detector around the oven. 

To try out the unit, we used it to check 
two ovens — the results were good. The 
newer unit was "clean" and no radiation 
could be found at any point tested. The 
second unit was considerably older. The 
door seals of that unit were still doing 
their job and no indication of radiation 
was observed. However, with the outer 
case removed from the unit, minimal 
radiation from the magnetron housing 
area of the oven was detected. It read only 
in the green area (about Vj-scale) which 
should classify it as harmless at any rea- 
sonable distance especially since that 
radiation was detected only once the outer 
case was removed. 

With the increased use of microwave 
ovens, a low-cost detector makes a lot of 
sense for the average homeowner. If that 
instrument were used regularly, it could 
protect your family from what could be a 
serious health hazard. Bear in mind that 
the leakage detector is a consumer device 
and is not suitable for professional or lab- 
oratory use. It is also not intended to 
replace the kind of thorough testing that 
can only be done by a profesional service 
technician. 

The Micronta Microwave Leakage De- 
tector requires no batteries or other power 
sources and should give years of depend- 
able service under normal care and use. It 
sells for S14.95. R-E 



. 



■ 



,*»'"' 




ioooTI 




NEW 
Tech VOM 

WV-547C 

Drop- proof. Fuse protected. 

High Impact ABS plastic case. 

• 

Rugged, 

accurate taut-band meter. 

• 

Sensitivity 

20,000 ohms-per volt DC 

9,000 ohms-per volt AC 

• 

21 color coded ranges. 

• 

Snap action, 

dual detent range switch. 

• 

Temperature scale - 

(optional accessory) 

• 

User oriented 

"right angle" test leads. 



^^^^HHHHI^^^^^^^^^^^H 



For $05. 50 

Here's your best VOM value. 

It's compact, drop-proof (3 feet) and provides 21 
color-coded ranges— volts, milllamps, ohms, 
temperature scale and decibels. True quality instru- 
ment for your portable applications. Tough, accur- 
ate, taut-band meter, fuse-protected. Sensitivity 
20,000 ohms/volt DC. High-impact case, colored 
bright orange. Snap action, dual-detent range 
switch. Range limits: 1000V DC and AC, 250 mA 
DC, one megohm, +200°C. Battery Test provision. 
Meter OFF position. Temperature scale (special 
probe optional). 

WV-547D. Same instrument in impact- re si slant 
carrying case. Handle converts to tilt stand. 

$39.95 

Want full technical details and a demonstration? Call toll-free, 1-800-523-3696, for the VIZ distributor near you. 




^flD 




Look to ViZfor value, quality, availability. 
Over 70 instruments in the line— PLUS full accessories. 

VIZ Mfg. Co., 335 E. Price St., Philadelphia, PA 19144 






CIRCLE 2 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



At CIE, yon get 

electronic* 




training 

front 

specialists* 

If you're interested in learning hour to fix air 
conditioning, service cars or install heating systems — 
talk to sonic other school. But if you're serious 
about electronics . . . even earning an Associate Degree , 
conic to CIE —The Electronics Specialists. 




Special Projects Director 
lid Institute of Electronics 




My father always told me that 
there were certain advan- 
tages to putting all your eggs In one 
basket. "John, ' he said, learn to 
do one important thing better than 
anyone else, and you'll always be 
In demand." 

I believe he was right. Today is 
the age of specialization. And I 
think til at' s a very good thing. 

Consider doctors. You wouldn't 
expect your family doctor to perform 
open heart surgery or yotir dentist to 
set a broken bone, either. Would you? 

For these things, you'd want a 
specialist. And you'd trust him. Be- 
cause you'd know if he weren't any 
good, he'd be out of business. 

Why trust your education 
and career future to 
anything less than a 
specialist? 

You shouldn't. And you certainly 
don't have to. 

FACT: CIE is the largest inde- 
pendent home study school in the 
world that specializes exclusively 
in electronics. 

We have to be good at It because 
we put all our eggs hi one basket: 
electronics. If we hadn't done a good 
job, we'd have closed our doors 
long ago. 

Specialists aren't for 
everyone. 

I'll tell it to you straight. If you 
think electronics would make a nice 
hobby, check with other schools. 

But if you think you have the 
cool — and want the train tag it takes 
—to make sure that a sound blackout 
during a prime time TV show will be 
corrected in seconds— then answer 
this ad. You'll probably find CIE has 
a course that's just right for you! 

At C Hi. we combine 
theory and practice. You 
learn the best of both. 

Learning electronics is a lot 
more than memorizing a laundry list 
of facts about circuits and transis- 
tors. Electronics is interesting be- 
cause it's based on some fairly recent 
scientific discoveries. It's built on 
ideas. So, look for a program that 
starts with ideas — and builds 
on them. 

That's what happens with CLE's 
Auto-Programmed® Lessons. Each 
lesson uses world-famous 
"programmed learning" methods to 
teach you Important principles. You 
explore them, master them com- 
pletely . . . before you start to 
apply them! 

But beyond theory, some of our 
courses come fully equipped with 
the electronics gear to actuallY let 
you perform hundreds of checking, 
testing and analyzing projects. 

In fact, depending on the course 
you take, you'll do most of the basic 
things professionals do every day — 
even use a Digital Learning Laboratory 
to apply the digital theory essential 
today to keep pace with electronics 
in the eighties. 



Plus diere's a professional quality 
oscilloscope you build and use to 
"see" and "read" the characteristic 
waveform patterns of electronic 
equipment. 

You work with experi- 
enced specialists. 

When you send us a completed 
lesson, you can be sure it will be 
reviewed and graded by a trained 
electronics instructor, backed by a 
team of technical specialists. If you 
need specialized help, von get it fast 
... in writing from the faculty spe- 
cialists best qualified to handle 
your question. 

People who have known 
us a long time, think of us 
as the "FCC License 
School/' 

We don't mind. We have a fine 
record of preparing people to take . . . 
and pass . . . the government- 
administered FCC License exams. 
In fact, in continuing surveys nearly 
4 out of 5 of our graduates who take 




the exams get their Licenses. You 
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Magnetic Garnet 
Epitaxial Layer 



Nonmagnetic Garnet 
Substrate 



mi ABOUT 



BUGBl€ MCMOIW 



DCVICCS 

ROBERT F. SCOTT 

SEMICONDUCTOR EDITOR 



YOU VE PROBABLY RliAO BRIEK ANNOUNCEMENTS OF NEW LSES 

for "bubble memory"" devices or watched as a TV science 
reporter demonstrated some futuristic device that would soon be 
made possible through the use of bubble memory. If this has 
given you the impression that bubble memory is a new revolu- 
tionary technology or a scicnce-fiction-like development that 
will never touch your personal life, you're dead wrong! Certain- 
ly you've misdiailed a telephone number and heard the follow- 
ing announcement: "We're sorry. Your call did not go through. 
Please check the number and dial again or ask your operator for 
assistance." This is an example of bubble memory in speech 
synthesis and telephone switching. 

The patent covering the discovery of the magnetic bubble and 
the fact that bubbles can be generated, replicated and erased was 
granted to Bell Laboratories scientists Richard C. Sherwood. 
William F. Schockley. Umbcrto F. Gianola. and Andrew H. 
Bobeck way back in 1966. An article in the Bell Labs Record, 
June/July 1970 announced that magnetic bubbles can be used to 
record, store and read data simply by applying and manipulating 
external magnetic forces. The presence or absence of a bubble at 
a given location represents a logic "1" or "0", respectively. 



In the November 1976 issue of the Record. Belt Laboratories 
announced a voice-message recorder using bubble memory 
technology . The analog message is encoded into a digital format 
and stored in the bubble memory until needed. The digitally 
stored data can be read out, decoded and converted back into the 
original voiceannouncement. Twelve seconds of digitized voice 
or twelve pages of single-space typewritten text containing 
280,000 bits of data can be stored on a single 10-mm by 10- mm 
square chip. This puts the chip in the same class as a 250K bit 
memory with 64K bytes of memory storage. 

The magnetic bubble memory (MBM) combines the read/ 
write features of RAM's, the non-volatility of ROM's, and is 
competitive in storage capacity with tape and- disk systems. 
Table I compares the performance advantages and dis- 
advantages of bubble memories with ROM's, PROM's, 
RAM's, and floppies. 

What is a bubble? 

Essentially, magnetic bubbles arc formed in a thin magnetic 
material that is polarized. Each magnetic bubble is a microscop- 
ic magnetic cylinder of reverse polarization to that of the thin 



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TABLE 1 


ADVANTAGES 




DISADVANTAGES 


Higher reliability 
Non-mechanical 
Smaller size 
Faster access 

Simpler interface 
Media integrity 


Bubble memory 
vs Floppy disk 


Stored data not 
readily changed 


Non-volatile 

More bits per device 

Reduced board space 


Bubble memory 
vs RAM 


Slower access 
Slower transfer rate 


Programmability 
More bits per device 
Less board space 


Bubble memory 
vs ROM or PROM 


Slower access 
Slower transfer rate 



magnetic substance that surrounds it. These bubbles arc the 
individual memory cells in the "bubble memory" that are 
comparable to the individual memory cells in a conventional 
semiconductor memory element. The important point is that 
physically, they are much smaller and therefore a lot more 
memory capacity tits into the same amount of space. Now let's 
take a look at how these devices are fabricated. 

The approximately '/t-inch square bubble memory chips are 
fabricated onto 3-inch diameter single-crystal epitaxial garnet 
wafers. The wafers have two layers; a non-magnetic gadolinium 
gallium garnet (GGG) substrate about 0.01 5-inch thick support- 
ing a grown film of magnetic garnet. (The film is 3 micrometers 
thick — about 120 millionths of an inch — and is composed of 
yttrium samarium calcium iron garnet.) Each 3-inch wafer can 
be sliced to yield up to 44 chips. 

When the magnetic film is formed, it is magnetized at right 
angles to its surface so that regions of both North polarization 
and South polarization exist. The magnetic regions (see Fig. 
1-a) are serpentine in shape and the surface areas of the North 
and South polarizations are equal in total size. 

When an external magnetic field (bias field) is applied per- 
pendicular to the film surface, magnetic regions having the same 
polarization as the bias field expand. At the same time, regions 
with reverse polarization shrink. As the intensity of the magnetic 
bias is increased, magnetic regions of the reverse polarization 
shrink until they become microscopic magnetic cylinders 
("bubbles") as shown in Fig. l.-b. 

_ FERROMAGNETIC SINGLE-CRYSTAL 
THIN FILM (GARNET) 



NONMAGNETIC 
SUBSTRATE (GGG) 




MAGNETIC RUBBLE 




EXTERNAL FIELD 



Fig. 1— WITHOUT EXTERNAL MAGNETIC FIELD the "S" and "N" magnet- 
ic domains have equal surface areas so the effective magnetic moment is 
zero (a). When external magnetic field (b) is applied, domains having 
opposite polarity shrink into microscopic magnetic cylinders called "bub- 
bles". 



The bubbles are 3 p.m in diameter and arc stable within a 
given range of bias intensity. Above this range, bubbles sudden- 
ly collapse and disappear. Below this range, they spontaneously 
return to the original serpent inc-shaped magnetic regions. 

In bubble memories, built-in permanent magnets arc used to 
provide the correct bias intensity. Thus bubble memories are 
non-volatile- — that is. information is not lost if electrical power 
is interrupted. 

Variable electromagnetic fields parallel to the film's surface 
are used to move the bubbles laterally (like hockey pucks) 
around in the film. The ability to generate and manipulate 
magnetic bubbles is the basis for the bubble memory device. The 
presence of a bubble at a given location represents a logic I ; the 
absence of a bubble represents a logic 0. 

In practice, the varying electromagnetic field is generated by 
a pair of electromagnetic coils wound around the chip at right 
angles to each other and fed triangle-waveform currents that are 
90°out-of-phase. This produces a rotating electromagnetic field 
that propels the bubbles along a "propagation" track formed 
from thin-film patterns of Permalloy — a soft nickel-iron mag- 



^ 



^ 



BUBBLES 




MAGNETIC BUBBLE 



s ss ss ss s 

* N SN SN S N S 
NNNNNNN N 
S NS NS MS N 

ROTATING s s s S S S S S 

MAGNETIC 

IN-PLANE 

FIELD 



Fig. 2— PROPAGATION TRACK is made of a soft ferromagnetic material 
shaped as chevrons, T-bars or asymetrical half-circles as shown in a. The 
rotating magnetic field changes the instantaneous magnetic polarity of 
the track elements; causing the bubbles to move down the track as in b. In 
this instance, the bubbles have "S" polarity and are attracted to "N" or 
North poles ot the track elements. 



nctic material — laid down in the form of T-bars, or asymmetric- 
al "chevrons" or semicircles. Sec Fig. 2. The bubbles move 
along under the chevrons; jumping from one to the other as the 
polarization of the rotating bias field changes. The bubble 
moves one stage along the pattern for each 360° revolution of the 
magnetic field. 

Figure 3-a shows how a simple rectangular propagation track 
of chevrons can be laid out on the magnetic garnet film. In 
practice, the track can follow various paths. One approach is a 
track that is compactly folded back and forth across the chip. 
The bubble stream is kept in continuous motion, passing a 
"write" head at one point and a "read" head at another point. 
Data is read as the bubbles make a full revolution around the 
track. 

Figure 3-b shows the basic construction of a magnetic bubble 
memory device. The chip is surrounded by two right-angle coils 



BUBBLES 



SUBSTRATE 



SOFT FERROMAGNETIC 
PATTERN 




PERMANENT 
MAGNETS 




Fig, 3— PERMALLOY CHEVRONS shown in a are placed on the garnet 
film/by using printed-circuit techniques. They are energized by the mag- 
netic field from a pair of crossed field coils (b) fed out-of-phase AC 
voltages. 

to provide the rotating magnetic bias field to drive the bubbles. 
Thin rectangular permanent magnets are added top and bottom 
to develop the perpendicular bias field to generate and sustain 
the bubbles. These permanent magnets preserve the bubbles in 
the memory: even when the rotating magnetic field is removed 
or power sources fail. This characteristic makes the bubble 
memory as non- volatile as disks or tape. In addition, the per- 
manent magnets provide a permanent magnetic field of such 
strength that bubbles can easily be generated, sustained, and 
erased. 

To make full use of magnetic bubbles as a memory device, wc 
must be able to erase or "annihilate"' old bubbles, generate new 
ones, "replicate" existing bubbles into two new ones, transfer 
selected bubbles from one track or loop to another, and detect 
the presence or absence of a bubble at a given location and point 
in time. 

How bubbles are generated 

The bubble generator most often used is a "hairpin" con- 
ductor loop inserted between the garnet film and a special 
"pickax" shape Permalloy chevron on the propagation track. 
See Fig. 4. When a pulse of current is passed through the 
"hairpin" loop, it generates a magnetic field opposite to the bias 
field in the direction that causes a bubble to form. The bubble is 



Jl_ 



PULSE CURRENT 



NONMAGNETIC CONDUCTOR 
PATTERN (HAIRPIN) 



A BUBBLE IS GENERATED HERE WHEN 
THE PULSE CURRENT FLOWS. 



© 




ROTATING MAGNETIC FIELD 



PICKAX 



Fig. 4— A NONMAGNETIC HAIRPIN is placed between the film and a 
Permalloy pattern. Bubble forms if hairpin is pulsed while rotati ng field is 
oriented as shown. 

then rapidly passed along the track by the rotating magnetic 
field. This process is repeated as data is written bit-by-bit and 



stored in memory. 

Switching bubble direction 

Bubbles arc transferred from one track to another by a Per- 
malloy pattern (Fig. 5) similar to the bubble generator. If the 
"hairpin" is pulsed when the rotating magnetic field is as 
shown, the bubble approaching from the right is inhibited from 
moving leftward and is diverted upward onto the intersecting 
track. Here's how it works. When a bubble is located at the right 
"pickax" point and a pulse of current is fed through the "hair- 
pin", field polarities momentarily block further movement to 
the left and the bubble is diverted into the tipper path by action of 
the rotating magnetic field. 



/%/%/* 



THE BUS 
WAYWKi 
CURREN 



E BUBBLE TAKES THIS 
WAY WHEN NO PULSE 
RRENT FLOWS, 




THE BUBBLE TAKES 
THIS WAYWHEN THE 
PULSE CURRENT FLOWS. 



PICKAX 



Fig. 5— PATTERN FOR CHANGING BUBBLE DIRECTION issimilarto bub- 
ble generator. If current pulse is fed to hairpin when direction of rotating 
field is as shown, bubble is diverted upward and inhibited from leftward 
movement. 



Bubble eraser 

The method for erasing a magnetic bubble uses the same 
technique for switching the direction of a magnetic bubble. 
Instead of being shifted into or from a secondary storage loop. 
the bubble is removed from the storage loop and erased by an 
electromagnetic pulse of proper polarity. 

Bubble detection 

Bubble detection for data recovery can cither be destructive 
(the bubble is destroyed and does not remain in the storage bank) 
or nondestructive (the bubble remains in the memory). Replica- 
tion or bubble division is used in nondestructive detection. One 
bubble continues along the normal path and remains in storage; 
the other is diverted to the detector and then erased. 

CURRENT IN 




1 BUBBLE CHANGES 
! RESISTANCE OF 
DETECTOR 



Fig. 6— BUBBLES ARE ELONGATED as they move from one "stretcher" 
pattern to the next. Bubbles are stretched to provide higher output from 
the Hall-effect detector. 



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DIRECTION OF 

MAGNETIC FIELD 



tl 



Fig. 7— BUBBLE REPLICATOR or splitter stretches bubble when rotating 
field angle is at (b) If hairpin is pulsed at this time, bubble splits as shown in 
(c). The two bubbles leave and move along different propagation tracks as 
field angle advances 90 . 

— • ■ % • • 



DETECTOR 



A A A A 



ANNIHILATE 



CH 



\J \J \J 



r\ 



vv 



vv 



GENERATE 



Fig. 8— THE BASIC BUBBLE MEMORY uses a serial-loop shift-register 
configuration. Access (or data-recovery) time is long because the data to 
be read must circulate through the entire loop. 

The bubble to be read passes under several rows of sym- 
metrica] chevrons (Fig. 6) which causes the bubble to stretch so 
its length is several hundred times the normal diameter. This 



much-elongated bubble is passed under a pattern of series- 
connected chevrons made of a special Hal I -effect Imagne- 
toresi stive] material. (H all-effect materials are those conductors 
whose resistance varies with the strength of a surrounding mag- 
netic Held.) A current of several milliampcres is passed through 
the magnctoresistive detector. As the stretched bubble passes 
through the detector, it causes the device resistance to drop 
sharply. This increases current flow sufficiently to produce an 
output pulse, of around 10 millivolts, that can be converted into 
a standard digital electronic pulse. 

Bubble replicator 

Figure 7 shows the replication process. It is based on the same 
pattern as the bubble generator and switcher. The bubble 
approaching from the right is elongated or stretched at the top of 
the pickax. It splits into halves when the hairpin is pulsed while 
the rotating magnetic field is in the angular area encompassed by 
the directional arrows. One of these bubhlcs is diverted upward 
to the bubble detector and eventual destruction while the other 
continues along the normal path and remains in the memory. 

Bubble memory architeture 

The basic bubble memory configuration is a simple serial loop 
shift register as illustrated in Fig. 8. This system has several 
disadvantages. One of the major ones is thai access time is long 
because bubbles must circulate through the entire string of 
chevrons before they can be read. Access time can range from 
370 to 750 ins. Another disadvantage is that perfect operation 
depends oh a near-perfect device. Defects in substrate, garnet 
film, or the etched chevron pattern decrease production yield 
and increase cost. For these reasons most bubbles memories use 
architecture (system designs) that have much shorter access 
times and allow for many defects in chip geometry. These will 
be discussed in a following issue. R-E 



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size by today's standards, offers a number of unique and time- 
saving features. 

The ZX8I is primarily a tool for learning how to program in 
BASIC and, while it is not the most sophisticated of machines on 
the market , it is very much so for its price class. It even becomes 
more sophisticated with the 16K memory-expansion module 

I that plugs into the back of the unit. 
The capabilities of the ZX8I don't end there, though. It is 
capable of supporting a raster-scan video display of 32 charact- 
ers by 24 lines, or roughly half that of the CRT (Cathode /fay 
7'ube) display of most other computers on the market. The 
tradeoff is that the display characters are double-sized. 
Not only will this machine teach you a little about kit building 
(if you choose to take that approach), but its excellent learning 
guide will te'ach you, in clear language, how to program in 
BASIC. And, once you have learned to program, you can store 
the results of your work on tape via a built-in cassette interface. 
If you are a touch typist, you probably won't like the 
membrane-type keyboard, even though it's laid out in standard 
"QWERTY" fashion. All the keys are there, but they are 
embossed on the flat face of the keyboard and you have to watch 
where you put your fingers. The keyboard appears better for the 
hunt-and-peck typist, rather than for the touch typist. In its 
favor, though, is the fact that ibis type of keyboard will prevent 
all sorts of messy accidents if there are children around the 
house. 

A particularly interesting feature of the computer is its 
defined-function keys. With them, it is possible to enter an 
entire BASIC statement or command with just one keystroke. 
There is also a line editor through which you will be able to 



$100-$500 



You may be surprised by 
just how much computer you 
can get for less than $500. 
That, and how to use this 
section, are the topics of this 
article, 

MARC STERN 



correct mistakes when your program refuses to run. 

Apparently realizing that a membrane-type of keyboard is not 
necessarily the best way to go, Sinclair has come out with 
another mini-microcomputer, the ZX Spectrum that uses a more 
standard one. It offers quite a bit more than the ZX8I and. while 
it costs more, it's scheduled to sell for less than $350 when it 
arrives here late this year (it's currently available in England). 

The language used is still a ROM-resident BASIC, but the 
Spectrum comes with 16K of RAM: thus, the user can do more 
with the system. And, by adding an expansion module, the 
Spectrum is able to address up to 48 K of RAM, That is the same 
amount of RAM found on many more sophisticated and ex- 
pensive systems and should also give this computer the ability to 
make use of higher-level software. 

The Spectrum keyboard, too, deserves some comment. It is 
much like the calculator- key-type keyboard that has been 
offered by some other computer manufacturers. That type of 
keyboard has never had a great deal of success in the personal- 
computer marketplace and manufacturers have had to change 
their keyboards to more typewriter- like units. It may cause 
problems for Sinclair, as well. In its favor, though, the keyboard 
of the new Spectrum has several user-definable keys that should 
allow a one-stroke user call of specific functions. 

The higher level of the Spectrum system is evident in its 
ability to address up to 100K of mass-storage space per drive on 
its S'/j-inch floppy-disk drives. 

Where the unit does fall down is in its display, which, 
although it offers color, is still a limited to 32 characters by 24 
lines. 

The 2X81 and Spectrum are only two examples of the many 
forms microcomputers take. They can range from a calculator- 
like handheld device through a larger compuier-in-a-keyboard 
type to a full-blown, business-ready, bus-oriented machine. 

Sharp/Radio Shack 

Low-cost handheld microcomputers are represented by the 
Sharp Electronics PC-1211 and PC-1500 and the Radio Shack 



! 







THE SHARP PC-1500 uses an eight-bit CPU. 
optional four-color printer plotter. 



It is shown here with its 



TRS-80 Pocket Computer and TRS-80 Pocket Compitier-2 (also 
known as the TRS-80 PC -2). Each computer bears two 
designations — Sharp's and Radio Shack's — because Sharp 
makes virtually identical handheld units for itself and for Radio 
Shack. The lower-priced PC-12H 'Pocket Computer demon- 
strate that not all microcomputers arc driven by eight-bit microp- 
rocessors. Instead, they usedua! four-bit CMOS microprccssors 
one of which handles the arithmetic functions of the handheld, 
and the other of which handles the resident BASIC and input. 
These handheld* arc programmable in Pocket BASIC and 
feature a 1.9K memory that is automatically partitioned for 
program and data storage. 



A user can load or save programs using an optional cassette 
interlace: [here is also a combination printer cassette interface 
available to produce hard copy of any program. 

The beauty of the handheld microcomputer is that it can be 
taken anywhere and be used to solve problems and perform 
calculations in the field. It is useful in engineering, scientific, 
student, and household applications, and there is software avail- 
able for all those areas. 

The pocket computers are advertised as having a true 
"QWERTY" I standard typewriter) keyboard. However, you 
will quickly discover from the size of the keys that if you want to 
enter data quickly, you had better do it one key at a time. The 
keys, while they have a positive feel, are a bit on the small side 
and don't lend themselves to touch typing. Above and to the 
right of the keyboard is a bank ol user-definable keys by which a 
user can either call a predefined function or routine. Once set up. 
they are kept in memory for the life of the computer's batteries. 
so you can recall them at any time at the touch of a button. 

The liquid-crystal display (LCD) is limited to one line of 24 
characters formed by a 5 x 7 dot matrix. When the line-limit is 
reached, the remaining characters are automatically dumped to 
the next line. 

As powerful as those microcomputers are. they don't can't 
hold a candle to the much more powerful PC-1500 and TRS-80 
Pocket Computer-2 . both of which feature true eight-bit CPU's. 
But. then, the (twice) four-bit units are much lower in price, at 
SI 60 and S 149.95. respectively. 

Again, the higher-priced— S300 for the Sharp PC-1500 and 
S279.95 for the TRS-80 PC-?— pocket computers are both 
actually made by Sharp. As mentioned earlier, they use true 
CMOS eight-bit CPU's. They arc fairly fast because they boast 









HOW TO USE THIS SPECIAL SECTION 



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46 



FIFTEEN YEARS AGO YOU NEVER WOULD HAVE BELIEVED !t! WHO 

would have thought there would be a day when a sophisticated 
computer would be available for less than a mega-dollar figure? 
After all, didn't computers require racks upon racks of com- 
ponents, displays, tape drives, card readers, and so on? 

But, look at what's happened. Computers are everywhere! 
Computers have shrunk several orders of magnitude in size and 
price, and the computing power of a machine that used to occupy 
an entire room is now available in a device that you can slip into 
your pocket. Prices have fallen correspondingly, and that hand- 
held computer may cost less than the suit whose pocket it's being 
carried in. 

Responsible for the revolution is the integrated circuit, or IC. 
Just as transistors replaced vacuum tubes in early mainframe 
(big) computers, IC's — containing thousands upon thousands of 
transistors — have replaced those discrete semiconductors. Cir- 
cuits that used to occupy an entire equipment rack now fit on a 
"chip" of silicon smaller than your fingernail — and that piece 
of silicon into a "package" smaller in volume than your thumb. 

A whole CPU i Centra] Proccssins: Unit — the heart of a com- 
puter) like the Z80, 6502, or 6800 can be had for under S7.00: 
just look at the ads at the back of this magazine! Similarly, 
computer-memory IC's have dropped tremendously in price, 
while their capacity has increased dramatically. Just a few years 
ago. 16K (about 1 6.000 characters' worth) of memory for Radio 
Shack's original TRS-80 computer was a bargain at SI 20.00. 
Today, the same memory IC's are available for about '/& that 
price. Along the same lines: Not too long ago, the most common 
memory IC had a capacity of just 1 K (1024 bits); eight of them 
would give your computer IK of memory. Today, a single IC 
can provide sixteen times the capacity of the older ones, at less 
than half the price — -and the trend continues. 

Price decreases brought about by advances in technology, 
together with the fact that computers are now mass-produced 
rather than built individually, have made small computers for 



the home and business an affordable reality. 

In this, the hardware portion of the "Your Own Computer" 
supplement to Radio-Electronics, we'll look at small-computer 
systems in order of increasing price — from S 1 00 1 or less) to over 
$4500, Within each price category we'll describe the equipment 
available, based on information supplied by manufacturers. You 
should bear in mind that options other than those shown exist for 
almost all systems, and that the prices shown in the tables apply 
specifically to the items described there. If a printer is men- 
tioned, its price is included in the total shown. If a printer is not 
mentioned, that does not mean it is unavailable; such devices as 
printers and disk drives, known as peripherals, are generally 
available from a number of sources other than the computer 
manufacturer. Before we plunge into descriptions of the compu- 
ter systems themselves, let's consider how a system can be 
configured — either by a manufacturer or by you. 

Peripherals In general 

Many — but not all — computers can be purchased ready to 
plug in and run. They will usually come with a certain ("minimal I 
amount of memory, and have provisions for a video display and 
for storing programs and data on audio cassettes or floppy disks. 
The display and storage devices may or may not be included in 
the purchase price (check the tables carefully when you're 
making price comparisons). While printers may be offered by a 
manufacturer, they generally arc not included in the price of the 
computer system. 

Regardless of whether or not a particular device is Included in 
the entire system package, the computer can usually be pur- 
chased without it and, in many cases, you will want to do that 
and then add the peripherals that will best meet your needs. 

Computers and memory 

Without memory, a computer is useless — it has no place to 
store a program or to manipulate data. Most computers come 







1.3-MHz clock speeds; in fact, their speech arc comparable to 
those of some full-featured personal computers. These second- 
generation devices recognize 42 statements, 34 functions and 6 
commands, which arc accessible from the 65 -key keyboard. 

They arc able to handle complex programs thanks to an 
Extended Pocket BASIC language that is resident in ROM. In 
fact, the user has direct memory access and these machines L -an 
easily handle maskable and timer interrupts. Just those func- 
tions, alone, give you an idea of the power of the computers. 
More is added by their string-handling capabilities. They arc- 
able to handle 80-character. two-dimensional arrays and will 
recognize such commands as leftS. midS. rightS. i.en. val. 
chrS, and strS (refer to a good text on BASIC to see how 
valuable those can be I 

The keyboard, also set up along "QWERTY" lines, hut 
which really isn't suitable For fast data entry due to its small 
keys, features IS programmable keys. 18 "softkeys" and 10 




x 



$100-$500 



THE RADIO SHACK TRS-BO Pocket Computer uses two. four-bit, micro- 
processors. 



preprogrammed command keys. 

These computers are easily able to handle such tasks as 
process control, data logging, and instant monitoring via an 
add-on RS-232C serial port, A communications package that 
will allow a person to use the computers as intelligent terminals 
for phone line access i electronic mail is also a possibility i is 
scheduled soon . 

Through the 60-pin connector on the side, these units can be 
connected to either a cassette interface or a combination color 
printer- pi otter cassette interface. That gives the user access to 
already existing cassette-based software and allows him to cre- 
ate and save his own programs and data files. The mass storage 
is only limited by the length of the cassette tape, and a short tape 
will hold plenty! 



with a minimal amount of memory, usually ranging from 4K to 
16K. While that is adequate for game-playing and simple home 
applications, a computer used for more serious purposes will 
generally require at least 48K of memory. Most of the computers 
mentioned here can be expanded to that point, or beyond. 

A few computers — -the "micro-mainframes," which are used 
in high-end microcomputer systems — arc available with no 
memory or CPU at all. Some of them are show r n in the low-end 
tables, but you should bear in mind that the price shown is for 
just the skeleton of the system— a chassis, power supply, and 
motherboard (the board that carries the bus signals): everything 
else is extra. The same, or a similar, mainframe will normally be 
found with add-ons in a higher-level table. 

External data-storage 

Every computer comes with either a cassette interface or a 
disk drive (or drives) to allow programs and data to be stored for 
future use. The tables shown a typical configuration for the price 
range in question. In almost every case there arc options avail- 
able to the user — either from the computer manufacturer or from 
outside suppliers — to permit the addition or expansion of disk 
facilities. Those, of course, will increase the price of the overall 
system. Add-on floppy-disk drives start at about S500.00 and 
can cost several thousand dollars for a dual, double-sided, 
double-density eight- inch system capable of storing about two 
megabytes (two million bytes = 16 million bits). 

Winchester disk systems, capable of storing five megabytes 
and more, start between $2000 and $3000 but — at least these 
days- — arc used mostly for "serious" applications. 

If you can afford it. you should have a two-drive system. Not 
only will you enjoy a greater storage capacity, but you will also 
find it much easier and faster to copy files from one disk to 
another. Perhaps more important is the fact that, if the capacity 
of a single disk is rather small ( 100K or less), it may not be 
possible for it to hold the DOS (Disk Operating System), pro- 
gram(s), and the data you will require. It's better to use the first 
drive of a dual-drive system for the DOS and program, and the 
second for Jala 



Printers 

When a printer is shown as part of a system in one of the 
tables, it is usually a medium-priced model, and is included to 
give you an idea of what the entire system-price would be. 

Printers are available starting from about S300 and going up to 
more than $3000. Generally the print quality improves as the 
price increases: sometimes speed is also a factor tied into price. 
The recent introduction of several letter-quality daisy- wheel 
printers for under S 1 000 is something that has long been waited 
for. and should make putting together a system able to provide 
typewriter-quality output a much less expensive proposition 
than it has been until now. The quality is achieved at the expense 
of speed, but the sacrifice should be worth it to many. 

Input/output devices 

Most computers require a keyboard for input and some kind of 
video display for output. Inexpensive computers usually have a 
built-in keyboard or keypad and provisions for connection to a 
video monitor or TV receiver. In the case of the latter, an RF 
modulator will be required if it is not built into the computer. 
Some computers, like Commodore's CBM line, and the 
Osborne ! have everything built in. Others, primarily the "mic- 
ro-mainframes," supply nothing: a terminal — a combination 
keyboard and display unit — must be added. Terminal prices 
start at around $600. 

We've tried to indicate what the situation is with regard to 
each computer, but bear in mind that some, like the Apple 11. 
may offer you several options for a display device. 

How to read the tables 

The tables included with each price-category section show 
which computers, features, and accessories you can expect to 
find in a typical system within that price range. If a system has 
been upgraded from a previous table, the new information 
appears in color. The tables will give you an idea of what you 
can get for a given price; a local computer store will be able to 
answer your questions and tailor a system to your specific 
requirements. R-E 



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A COMBINATION computer, video game, and music synthesizer, the MAX 
Machine Is Commodore's least expensive model. 

Furthermore, the printerteassctte interface, allows two 
selte recorders to be connected to make Sic handling simpler and 
to provide greater storage capacity. 

Admittedly, the 4K of RAM that comes with these computers 
isn't very much, but it can be expanded to I6K through a plug-in 
module. 

Again, the displays are LCD's with 7-by-156-dot resolution. 
Special alphanumeric or graphics characters can be user- 



deltned — a further indication of the power of these units. That 
isn't all that is user-definable, though. The size of the printer 
characters, as well as their color (there are four to choose from), 
can also be defined. The printer can be use for plotting as well as 
for hard-copy backup of any programs you may have written. 

Commodore 

Leaving the handheld microcomputers and returning to the 
computer-in-a-keyboard types . \\ e Unci they are offered by some 
famous names in the computer and home-entertainment fields. 
One such company is Commodore Business Machines — 
originators of the PET computer. 

Commodore manufacturers several keyboard-only (the entire 
computer is housed inside the keyboard enclosure) machines. 
Perhaps you have heard of the VIC 20. It is one of theirs, as well 
as is another under-S500 unit known as the MAX Machine. 

At one time , the VIC 20 was the lo w end of the C BM 1 ineup; at 
S295, it certainly is inexpensive. However, it has been replaced 
as Commodore's least expensive model by the MAY Machine. 
which has a price tag of S 1 79.95. What is common to both units, 
and the rest of the Commodore lineup (except for the very-top- 
of-thc-line model), is an eight-bit microprocessor. All CBM 
machines are driven by one form or another of the 65xx (6502, 
6509, 6510, etc.) family of CPU's. 



TABLE 1— S100-S500 



Manufacturer 



Model 



Price 



CPU 



Word 

Length 



Disk 

Operating 

System(s) 



Language(s) 



Atari Home 
Computers 
1 1 92 Borregas 
Sunnyvale. CA 94086 



Atari 400 



$299 



6502B 




Netronics Research ELF II 



$99.95 



1802 



8 bits 



N/A 



BASIC 

assembly, 

Pilot 



Commodore Business 

Machines 

487 Devon Pk. Rd, 

Wayne, PA 19087 


VIC 20 


$295 


6502 


8 bits 


NA 


BASIC 


Commodore Business 
Machines 


CBM MAX 


S179 


6510 


8 bits 


NA 


BASIC 


Heath Co. 
Benton Harbor, 
Ml 49022 


H-8 


S350 
(kit) 


8080 


8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 


M/A COM OSI 

7 Oak Pk. 
Bedford, MA 01730 


OSI 
Superboard 


$350 


6502 


8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 


Netronics Research 
333 Litchfield Rd. 
New Mllford, CT 06776 


Explorer 85 


$129.95 


8085 


8 bits 


NA 


machine 



machine 



. 



Radio Shack 
One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth. 
TX 76102 



Sharp Electronics 
10 Keystone PI. 
Paramus, NJ 07652 



Sharp Electronics 



TRS-80 
Pocket 

Computer 
(PC- l.i 



$149.95 2 custom 
CMOS 



4 bits 



N A 



PC-1211 



PC -1500 



S160 custom CMOS 



S300 



custom CMOS 



2 ■• 4 
□its 



8 bits 




NA 



BASIC 



Radio Shack 


TRS-80 
Pocket 
Computer 2 

(PC-2) 


$279.95 


CMOS 




NA 


BASIC 




Radio Shack 


TRS-80 

Color 

Computer 


$399.00 


6809 


8 bits 


N A 


BASIC 





BASIC 



BASIC 



£ RADIO-ELECTRONICS 


Sinclair Research 

Ltd. 

50 Stanilord St. 

Boston. MA 021 14 


ZX Spectrum 


under 
S300 


Z80A 


8 bits 


NA 


BASIC 


Sinclair Research 


ZX81 


$99.95 
($79.95 

kit) 


Z80A 


8 bits 


NA 


BASIC 


Tim ex 

1579 Straits Tpke. 

Middlebury, CT 06762 


Ttmex 1000 


$99.95 


Z80A 


8 bits 


N A 


BASIC 

















The MAX Machine is a three-in-one computer, II is a compu- 
ter, a game machine, and a music synthesizer, all in one pack- 
age. It has a membrane keyboard but. rather than being com- 
pletely smooth, the keyboard has indentations where the keys 
are. That should make it much more convenient to use. It's a 
compromise between a full-keyboard, such as the one found on 
the VIC 20 and the flat membrane-type keyboard used by the 
ZX81. 

The CPU in the MAX Machine is a 65 10. It differs from other 
65xx-serics CPU's in that it has more input and output lines. It 
can "play "not only arcade-type games, but also educational 
and musical ones. The firmware — program-containing IC's 
within the machine — is capable of generating 16 colors and 3 
independent, 9-octave voices for 3-part musical harmony. 

You don't have to rely on pre-programmed game cartridges 
for this computer. Instead, you can write your own programs, 
creating your own characters and games, and then save them on 
cassette tape for future use. 

But, the MAX isn't just a game machine. It is also a home 
computer, capable of being programmed in BASIC (or as CBM 
calls it, "MAX Machine BASIC"). The MAX Machine is 
capable of nine-digit numeric accuracy and features a range of 
built-in math functions. It can handle both words and math 
strings, and its BASIC can be translated for use with other CBM 






$100-$500 



computers. 

There are several peripheral devices available, not the leasl of 
which is the sophisticated Sound Interface Device. With that 
unit, die MAX Machine can produce music and sound effects 
which may rival those of other music synthesizers now on the 












Memory/Storage 


Expansion 


Keyboard 


I/O 


Display 


Comments 


16K/cassette 
Interface 




57 keys, 
membrane 


4 serial. 






5 K' cassette 
interface 




66 keys, 4 user- 
programmable 


serial, 
parallel 






N/A/ 

cassette interface 




64 keys. 4 user- 
programmable 


N A 










1 6-key keypad 


NA 


N.A 


micro- 
mainframe 



4K/eassette 
interface 



standard 



serial 



256 bytes 
cassette interface 



serial 



256 bytes 
cassette interface 



hex keypad 



N.A 



1 424-step. 
N/A 



65 keys, 6 user 
programmable, 
3 levels 



N/A 



24-character 
LCD 






4KNA 



65 keys, 6 user 
programmable, 
3 levels 



NA 



24-character 
LCD 



4 K' cassette 
interface 



53 button-type keys serial 



8 colors, 
192 x 256 



1 424-step.' 
N/A 



3.5K/ 
N/A 



65 keys, 6 user- 
programmable. 3 
levels 



NA 



24-character 
LCD 



65 keys, 6 user- 
programmable, 3 
levels 



NA 



24-character 
LCD 



1 6K/cassette 
interface 


standard 


serial 


32 ■ 24 text 


1 K cassette 
interface 


membrane 


N A 


32 ■ 24 text 


1 K cassette 
interface 


membrane 


N/A 


32 x 24 text 



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ANOTHER INEXPENSIVE MACHINE from Commodore. the VIC JfO's mem- 
ory can be expanded to 32K, 

market. You can create not only three-part harmony over nine 
octaves, but can also program the attack, decay, sustain and 
release times through an ADSR (Attack. Oecay, Sustain, Re- 
lease) generator. The sound section also has a programmable 
filter and offers variable resonance. 

The computer has a built-in RF modulator so it can be used 
with an ordinary color (or black-and-white) TV receiver. Mass 
storage is via a cassette recorder. 

The other under-S500 CBM unit is the VIC 20 mentioned 
previously. Driven by an 8-bit 6502. the VIC 20 is a powerful 
home/game computer. It comes with 5K of RAM. but that is 
probably insufficient for most operating tasks so it is advisable 
to obtain one of the plug-in memory expansion modules, avail- 
able in 3K. 8K, and 16K sizes; thus, it is possible to increase the 
amount of RAM to 32K . The system language is ROM-resident 
Pet BASIC. 

This is a good system on which to learn programming — CBM 
supplies a very good BASIC primer that leads you step-by-step 
through the language. 

Although the system is aimed at the low-end market, it is 
capable of being expanded into quite a powerful one. The 
66-key keyboard has a number of dual function keys (the alter- 
nate functions are indicated on the fronts of the keys). 

While the keyboard is more-or-less standard, some of the 
keys seem out of place when compared to other layouts. For 
example, the colon/semi-colon functions are on two separate 




50 



THE MEMORY CAPACITY, and the sophistication, of the Sinclair ZXS 1 can 
be increased by adding a 16K memory-expansion module. 



M/A-COM-OSI has announced that it is discontinuing many of its 
personal computer lines. The only systems that will remain in produc- 
tion are the C4P-MF-48K, which has been renamed the C100; the 
C2-OEM, now the 220C; the C2D, now the 220E; the C3-OEM, now 
the 240C; the C3D, now the 230E; the C3C, now 2501, and the C3B, 
now the 250J- Be aware that while the other OS I systems mentioned 
in this section may remain available for some time, the availability of 
future support for those systems is highly questionable. 

keys, and they are not located — as is usually the case — under the 
right hand. That may prove awkward for someone used to 
programming on a typewriter-style keyboard, as may ' "out of 
place" quotation marks. 

This computer, too. has a built-in RF modulator for use with a 
TV set. The display is a double-sized 22 characters by 23 lines, 
which is about one-quarter that of other, more expensive per- 
sonal computers. Graphics resolution is a respectable 176 by 
1 84 pixels (F/cture Clements) and the user has 1 6 colors from 
which to choose. 




A WIDE VARIETY of peripherals are available for upgrading the Radio 
Shack TRS-80 Color Computer. 

The expansion capabilities of the VIC 20. though, com- 
pensate greatly for the shortcomings of the keyboard and dis- 
play. After more memory is added, system expansion can con- 
tinue with the addition of a single, double-density 5!A-inch 
floppy-disk drive. That adds 170K of mass storage to the sys- 
tem. As with most Commodore equipment, an IEEE-488 in- 
terface is provided: an R5-232C serial port can be added. 

For hard-copy backup, an 80-column dot-matrix printer is 
available, which docs make this system a complete home- 
computing system, for telecommunication applications, it is 
capable of interfacing with other computers via the phone lines 
through the use of the VICMODEM. 

Not only is the VIC 20 a learning tool . but it is also capable of 
doing word processing with the additional of the VlCWriter 
cassette, And. if that's not enough, it can also generate music 
through four tone -generators and games can be played using 
joystick controllers. 

Radio Shack 

Another of the key board -type computers on the market is the 
TRS-80 Color Computer, manufactured by Radio Shack. Ai 
$299 fora4K unit, it is not expensive, but it docs pack quite a lot 
of potential. 

In its most basic version, this 6809E-driven computer has 4K 



of RAM. which, admittedly, is a bit limited for serious computer 
work. However, the situation can be corrected with the addition 
of plug-in RAM. The Color Computer can have its RAM ex- 
panded to 32K this way. In fact, to advance from the more 
limited Color BASIC programming language to the more- 
powerful Extended Color BASIC, you need a minimum of 16K 
of RAM. Both BASIC'S are ROM-resident. 

The number-crunching (calculating) capabilities of this sys- 
tem are slowed by its low clock-speed of .894 MHz, although it 
should be perfectly adequate for the many videogames available 
for this unit. 

Tine Color Computer features a respectable resolution of 1 92 
x 256 pixels and it is capable of generating up to 8 colors. With 
the extra RAM and the Extended Color BASIC installed, it is 
also capable of handling some fairly sophisticated tasks. For 
instance, not only is it capable of data and string handling, but it 
can also handle dimensional arrays and has nine-place accuracy 
in its math functions. The Extended Color BASIC also provides 
for sophisticated graphics, allowing such character generation 
as creating circles, drawing figures, or screen painting. 

String arrays of as much as 255 characters in length are also 
allowable, as is user-definition of memory content through the 
use of pef.k and POKE commands. Machine-language routines 
can be called from BASIC for use in programs that arc written in 
that language. 

Although the system is capable of expansion into a fairly 
powerful home computer due to the large number of peripherals 
available, the display-limit of 32 characters by 16 lines, which 
seems adequate for game playing and some programming. 
would seem to be restrictive for word processing. 

A wide variety of peripherals is available, including a color 
receiver, cassette recorder, joystick controllers, I6K RAM up- 
grade, 32K RAM upgrade. Extended Color BASIC, modem. 
Editor/ Assembler module, printer, mini-floppy disk drives and 
plug-in controller pack. 

The 53-key keyboard is another of the button-types and it 
seems to have found a comfortable niche in this computer. As 
you can see, this unit can be made into quite a powerful system, 
and we'll look at it more fully further on. 

Atari 

The last of the computers-in-a- keyboard is the Atari 400. 
Perhaps Atari is best known to you as an electronics game 
specialist, but it's a short step from providing high-level- 
graphics video games to providing home computing power, and 
Atari has now made it with its $299 Atari 400, 

This computer is another one using a membrane keyboard, 
which is a plus where children or coffee spills abound, but which 
can siow down a touch typist. 

Unlike other key board- computers on the market, the 400 
seems to lack a one-key function option. Where other comput- 
ers, like the Sinclair, allow a user to have single-stroke access to 
a programming function and the keyboard is labeled as such, the 
keyboard of the Atari 400 has no such provision. 

Its primary strength seems to lie in its educational value. 
There is a large amount of cassette-based educational software 
available for this unit, as well as games and communication-* 
software. Additionally, there is a BASIC-programming course 
available. 

Peripherals available include a cassette recorder and a com- 
munications interface, which allows you to connect to various 
databases, such as The Source and the Dow Jones Information 
Services. The "Communicator" package includes the phone- 
interface module, acoustic modem, and the Atari Telclink firm- 
ware that makes it all work. 

M/A COM OSI 

The M/A COM-OS1 Superboard is a huilding-block type of 
personal computer that starts out as a complete computer on a 
board. What that means is that the board contains the CPU. 
memory, and all the I/O lines needed to make it a working unit. 
All that has to be added is a 5- volt DC power supply and a video 



1 



$100-$500 



display. Included in this $350 unit are4K of RAM. expandable 
to 8K. along with 8K of ROM-resident BASIC. The unit also 
contains video-output circuitry, a cassette interface, and an 
integral keyboard. 

Netronics 

Continuing in this vein, we come to the venerable epitome of 
the "roll your own - " computers, the S99.95 Elf II from Netro- 
nics. It is one of the oldest single-board computer kits on the 
market and is based on the RCA 1802-series CPU. For the 
record, it is one of the last computers on the market to make use 
of Tiny BASIC. 

The Elf II is constructed on a small PC board, and uses a hex 
(hexadecimal) keypad for programming in machine language. A 
composite-video signal is also generated for display on a moni- 
tor or on a TV receiver equipped with an RF modulator. RAM is 
a rather limited 256 bytes, but that is expandable to 64K. (The 
£////is very expandable for a single-board machine — about half 
the board area is reserved for that purpose,) A full keyboard is 
available as an option. Another peripheral is a A/D-D/ A conver- 
ter board. 

A far more complete "roll your own" personal computer is 
Netronics' Explorer 85. It can be built into a rather powerful 
system. A two- or six-slot S- 100-bus( more about the S- 100 bus 
later) can be added, and from there, expansion is virtually 
unlimited. There are many expansion peripherals available. 
including RAM boards, of course, which can turn this system 
into a powerful eight-bit machine. They include keyboards, 
CRT. eight-inch disk drive, floppy -disk controller, audio board . 
light pen, hex keypad, cabinetry and the CP/M disk-operating 
system. 

Micro-mainframes 

The final under-S500 category consists of the micro- 
mainframes — bare- bones computers (sometimes without even a 
CPU) — that can be expanded into extremely complex and cap- 
able systems. They usually use the S-100 bus. an arrangement 
that uses 100 lines to carry address, data, and control informa- 
tion to and from the various boards that arc plugged into it. The 
S-100 bus was the first microprocessor bus, and is still going 
strong, especially in high-end computers. 

Among computers that can be considered micro-mainframes, 
are the Heath HH, and the 1MSAI HOW and SOI 5 

The HH, in its basic form for S350 (kit), provides you with a 
power supply, motherboard, CPU and monitor ROM. an octal 
keypad, and a 7-segment LED display. 

The IMSAI's. and others like them, in their least-expensive q 
kit version, give you an enclosure, motherboard (usually S- ^ 
100), and power supply. Everything else is optional, but be- j^ 
cause the are several hundred boards available for the S- 1 00 bus. 3> 
the sky's the limit when it comes to putting together a complete <£ 
system. R-E f5 



Radio Shack's TRS-80 
Your Best Choice in a 
First Computer 



Why? Because you can start with 
our $999 Model III and easily— and 
economically— expand into a 
powerful, professional system! 



«.«■«.* 



mi, 
, tin- 
i uses i 

I CM 

i insu 

I liaECTJGfllll 

i rvuM* 
. ibum) 

wxnut 







■ Add Up to 4 Double-Density 
Disk Drives— 2 Internally 

■ Go from 16K to 48K Memory 
» Add RS-232C Interface 

■ Or Get It All with Our s 2295 
Model III Desktop Computer 

A Radio Shack Model III is a 

versatile, self-contained computer 
that can grow with you. Whether 
you' re a begin ner or a pro, there's one 
that fits your budget and intended 
use. And features you'd expect to pay 
extra for are standard on Model III. 

The built-in "extras". Our 5 999 
system includes: a 65-key keyboard 
with 12-key data pad, a 12" 
high-resolution monitor, and a parallel 
printer interface. 

You get much more, including 16K 
memory, powerful Model III BASIC 
language, 500 and 1500 baud 
cassette operation , 1 6 lines of 64 or 32 
upper and lower case characters, 
repeating keys, special graphics 
characters, program editor and real 
time clock. 

Model HI is ready for a wide range of 
professional and personal uses. 
Choose from our large library of 
user-proven programs or develop 
yourownapplicationsineasy-to-learn 
BASIC. Just add a cassette recorder 
to store and run programs 
and data. Cat. No. 26-1062. s 999 




Choose our professional Model III 
Desktop Computer for more sophis- 
ticated applications. You get the 
same basic features as the smaller 
model, but with 48K internal memory, 
two built-in double-density mini disk 
drives for 368K of program and data 
storage and a built-in RS-232 Serial 
Interface to communicate with other 
computers using an optional tele- 
phone coupler, like our new Modem II 
(right). Our powerful disk operating 
system (TRSDOS) is included along 
with an expanded Disk BASIC 
language. And we have optional pro- 
gramming languages to meet spe- 
cific needs— choose from COBOL, 
Assembler, Compiler BASIC and 
FORTRAN. And of course the small- 
est Model III can be upgraded to this 
top of the Model III line. .. nn - 
Cat. No. 26-1066. £.£&& 

Get a "hands-on" demonstration 
of the TRS-80 Model HI today at 
more than 290 Radio Shack Com- 
puter Centers and 6300 Radio Shack 
stores and participating dealers na- 
tionwide. Ask about our service and 
leasing plans, too. 



NEW! Direct-Connect 
Modem II Automatically 
Dials and Answers Phone 




Radio /hack 

The biqqest name in little computers'" 



Connects Directly to Phone Line 
And Any RS-2 32 -Equipped TRS-80 

Now your TRS-80 can access and 
transfer data by telephone. Program 
the Modem II to dial and answer, re- 
ceive and transmit, even hang-up. 
300 baud. FCC registered. 
Cat. No. 26-1173. s 249 



Send me a free TRS-80 catalog. 

Mail To: Radio Shack 
Dept, 83-A-575 
300 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth. Texas 76102 



NAME 

COMPANY 

ADDRESS 

CITY 

STATE ZIP. 



computers' 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 
CIRCLE 4 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



Retail prices may vary at 
individual stores and dealers. 



$500 to $1000 




$500-$1000 



MARC STERN 



You might be surprised at how much computing power you can get at a modest cost. Here's 

a took at what's available in this price range. 



IF YOU THINK THE LEVELOF SOPHISTICATION AMONG THE SIO0 In 

$500 microcomputers is high, then that of those in the $500 to 
$1000 range is truly amazing. 

One thing that becomes apparent looking at the variety of 
microcomputers in this category is that the dominant CPU 
choice of the computer industry is the eight-bit microprocessor. 
In fact, it is still the king of the home computer realm, although 
the 16-bit micro is beginning to make its presence felt. 

In this price category, we find both handheld and desktop 
computers. For instance, both the Radio Shack and Sharp hand- 
held^ have peripheral equipment that can put them into this 
segment. The printer/cassette interface available for both costs 
nearly $251) and pushes both Radio Shack's PC-2 and the 
Sharp's PC-iSOO over $500. Opting for the cassette interface 
only will keep the price below $500. though. 

Panasonic 

And. speaking of handheld computers, we now come to the 
Panasonic RL-HI000 and RL-IU4Q0. Though their CPU'S are 
not specifically identified, ii looks as ii ihey are eight-bit de- 
vices. These two computers are building blocks for a true 
briefcase -portable microcomputer system. Though the $500 
RL-H 10(H) comes with only 2K of RAM. and the RL-H1400 
only 4K, these are amazing units. 

Both use the SNAP operating system, which is derived from 
the FORTH language. Among the programming languages the 




ONCE A DREAM, hand-held computers, such as Ihis one from Panasonic, 
are readily available at a relatively low cost. 



computers recognize is BASIC, and you can work in BASIC 
using the 65-key keyboard, which is laid out in typewriter 
fahsion. (Although it is arranged in the "QWERTY" pattern, 
like the other handhelds. the small size of the keys seems to 
preclude touch typing.) 

As with other handheld computers in this price range, you can 
both perform immediate arithmetic calculations and run pro- 
grams on these units because a calculator function is built in. 

It is in the system's expansion capabilities that their real 
power can be seen. Not only are they interfaceable with a video 
display via a video/RF adaptor <RF modulator), but they also 
have an RS-232C interface, along with a programmable mod- 
em, plus an I/O adapter for those and other peripherals. There 
arc also, of course. RAM expansion modules. 

You can take the systems into the field and use them as remote 
terminals to communicate with a computer at another location or 
you can use them as full stand-alone systems to solve problems 
on the spot. 

Although both basic units fit into the under-SlOOO price 
category, a little memory expansion is enough to push them into 
the next higher one. 

Other systems 

Carryover exists not only among the handheld computers, but 
also among the home/game computers, too. For instance, even 
though the Atari 400 has a base price of $29'), it isn't inconceiv- 
able that by adding the telephone interface and modem, plus a 
couple of program cartridges and the game controllers, that the 
price of the unit could rise well above S500. The same is true of 
the Commodore MAX Machiw and VIC 20. which have a broad 
range of peripherals available. 

Look at the Radio Shack Color Computer. A I6K cassette- 
based system (as opposed to the now-discontinued 4K system) 
with Extended Color BASIC costs S499.95; increase the RAM 
to 32K and the price rises to $649 95. \ cassette recorder, 
needed tor program and data storage I unless you have a more 
expensive disk-based system) costs an additional $60. 

But. the added capabilities sou g;iin From any of the expanded 
systems more than outweigh the extra expense. 

Radio Shack 

The $500-$ i (KM) price category is not only the home of the 
expanded handheld and home/game computers, but is also the 
starting point lor other, more powerful systems For instance, a 



O 
o 

H 

o 

CD 

m 

OP 

ro 



4K. cassette-based TRS-Si) Model III. an important personal and 
small-business computer (particular!) when expanded i is pri< cd 

at $699. 

Yet. look at what you get lor the money. You get a veil- 
contained 12-inch black-and-white CRT with a 65-key key- 
board. There's also a I 2-key keypad for rapid numerical entry. 
The display is memory-mapped, which means that you can 
define various graphic element- ami uKo instruct the computet 
to .mange its display exactly to your liking. The displaj size iv 



slightly smaller than usual, at 64 character- by Hi lines but 
allows the use ot a double -sized display 02by 16). which can be 
useful in some cases 

From this modest starting point a very powerful system can 
grow. The TRS-80 Model III can easily be fitted with an RS- 
232C serial board, so communications potential, important for 
many applications, is alread) there. 

"Die Level I machine i^ no slouch when it comes to work. Its 
BASIC is capable of supporting a 4K by 128 graphics displaj . 



TABLE 2— S500-S1000 



Disk 
Word Operating 



Manufacturer 


Model 


Price 


CPU 


Length 


System(s) 


Language(s) 




Atari Home 
Computers 
1l92Borregas 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 


Atari 
800 


S899 


6502B 


8 bits 


NA 


BASIC 




Commdore Business 

Machines 

487 Devon Pk. Hd. 

Wayne, PA 19087 


Commodore 


S595 


6510 


8 bits 


N'A 


BASIC 




Commodore Business 
Machines 


Commodore 
P128 


$995 


6509 


8 bits 


N A 


BASIC 




Commodore Business 
Machines 


VIC 20 


S769 


6502 


8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 





Cromemco, Inc. 
280 Bernardo Ave. 
Mm. View. CA 
94043 



System 
Zero 



S995 



Z80A 



8 bits 



N/A 



. 



BASIC 



Formula Int'l. 
12603 Crenshaw 
Hawthorne. CA 90250 



Pineapple 



$645 



6502 



8 bits 



N/A 



BASIC 



imsai Com p. Dlv., 
Fischer- 

Freitas Corp. 
910 81 si Ave., 
Oakland, CA 94621 



1-8080 



$799 



8080 



8 bits 



N A 




lmsal Comp. Div„ 
Flscher- 
Freitas Corp. 



I-8080K 



$599 



8080 



8 bits 



N/A 



Imsai Comp. Div., 

Fischer- 

Freitas Corp, 



1-8085 



S950 



8085 



8 bits 



NA 



Imsai Comp. Dlv., 
Fischer- 
Freltas Corp. 



PCS-8015 



$750 



8080 



8 bits 



N'A 



MA COM OSI 
7 Oak Pk. 
Bedford, MA 01730 



OSIC1P 



$565 



8 bits 



NA 



"BASIC 



NEC Home Elec. 
1401 Estes Ave. 
Elk Grove, IL 
60007 



NEC PC-8001 S995 



uPD 780 c-1 
{Z80-like) 



,8 bits 



N/A 



NBASIC 



Newtronlcs Research 
333 Litchfield Rd. 
New Miltord, CT 
06776 



Explorer 85 



S886 



8085 



8 bits 



BASIC 



Panasonic 
1 Panasonic Way 
Secaucus, NJ 
07094 



RL-H1000 



$500 



8 bits 



N'A 



BASIC 



Panasonic 



RL-H1400 



$600 



8 bits 



N A 



BASIC 



Radio Shack 

One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 



w 

Q 76102 



TRS-80 
Color 

Computer 



$700 



6809 



8 bits 



N.A 



BASIC 



g Radio Shack 



TRS-80 
Model III 



S699 



Z80 



8 bits 



NA 



BASIC 



5 Radio Shack 

UJ 



TRS-80 

Model III 



5999 



Z80 



8 bits 



NA 



BASIC 



uj Texas Instruments 
6 PO Box 22501 2 
Dallas, TX 75265 



T1-994A 



$525 



TMS99O0 



16 bits 



N A 



BASIC 



Texas Instruments 



TI-99/4 



S450 



TMS9900 



16 bits 



N/A 



BASIC 



54 



single dimension arrays and limited >tiiny variables. All that 
isn't bad in a machine which has only 4K of RAM. but it also 
points out the need for the next step up in the Radio Shack line, 
the SW TR.S-NO MotM 111. Model III BASIC. I6K machine. 
which has much greater capabilities 

For instance, the Model ill BASIC that works with this 
system is far more extensive in scope than the Level 1 BASIC. It 
has an extensive command set. and permits multidimensional 
arrays and comprehensive string variables. It also allows auto- 



_ 



ory'Storage 



Expansion 



Keyboard 



matic line numbering when writing programs. The Model III 
BASIC also supports a trace mode of program debugging and 
also allows the use of" the peek and i>oki commands so you can 
not only have direct access to specific memory locations, but can 
also look at the contents of a given memory location. This 
greatly enhanced version of BASIC will also support machine- 
language subroutine calls, and provides 16-digit accuracy — that 
high degree of accuracy can prove to be particularly valuable in 
accounting applications. 



I/O 



Display 



Comments 






16K RAM cassette 



61 keys, 
4 special 
function 



serial, 320 x 1 92, 

parallel 16 colors 

40 x 25 text 



64 KJ cassette 



65 keys, some user serial, 
definable parallel 




128fC cassette 




94 keys, some user- 
definable 


serial 


320 
text. 


< 280, 40 x 
16 colors 


25 




SK'cassette 


■i cassette 


66 keys, 4 user- 

proqrammable 


serial, 

parallel 












1K 




NA 


N/A 


NA 








micro- 
mainframe, 
3 slots 


64K 




N/A 


N A 


N A 








kit 



front panel 



NA 



N/A 



micro- 
mainframe, 
20 slots 



front panel 



N'A 



N.A 



micro- 
mainframe, 
20 slots, 
kit 



Iront panel 



N/A 



N/A 



8K cassette 



memory expands, 
CRTcasE 



micro- 
mainframe, 
20 slots 







N/A 


NA 


micro- 
mainframe, 
20 slots 


BKcassette 


full keyboard 


serial 


24x24 or 48x12 
text 




32K/cassette 


84 keys, 
12-key keypad 


serial, 
parallel 










2K 



65-key mini- 
keyboard 



N/A 



24-character LCD 



■ 


4K 








65-key mini- 
keyboard 


N/A 


24-character LCD 






4K/cassette 


joysticks. Videotex 
pak, modem, 
appliance control 


53 button -type keys 


serial, 


256x192 
8 colors, 
32x16 text 






4K 








65 keys, 

12 -key keypad 


parallel 


64(32) x 16 text 


integral 
display 




■ 


1 6rCcassette 








65 keys, 

1 2-key keypad 


parallel 


64(32) x 16 text 


integral 
display 




™ 








standard 


serial 


16 colors 






16K cassette 








standard 


serial 


16 colors 







03 

m 

3) 



Texas Instruments 

It is into this area that the name of another giant ol the industry 
enters, Texas Instruments. It recent!) enhanced its 71-9914 home 
computer into the TI-99 4A 

The basic TI-99I4A is driver by a Texas Instruments 1 6-bit 
TMS9900 CPU, as is (he 77-99 4. No. that's not a typographic 
error — Tl uses a powerful 16-bit microprocessor in its home 
computers and has finally unleashed some of the potential pou er 
of that processor in the enhanced machine. 

One of the early criticisms raised about the 77-99 4 was that. 
although a 16-bit processor was used, computerists couldn't 
access its potential power. The reason was that all of the pro- 
gramming was ROM-resident, and inaccessible to the potential 
programmer. There was no tt a> lor an individual user to work in 
machine language, and no way to save high-level language 
programs except on cassette. Unfortunately, that is still true to a 
great extent. Most of the programming for TI's home computer 
is still ROM-based in the form of cartridges, bul now . at least, a 
disk-based editor assembler allows you to write machine- 
language programs. 

What does the S525 basic keyboard unit contain'.' It contains 
the CPU and I6K of RAM. There is alsoa substantial amount of 
ROM that contains the TI operating system and BASIC. 

In a more powerful version of this system, a user can link 
BASIC and machine- language for direct access to teh system 
features. "That is done h\ using the call commands i inn. i ink. 
['tis., poke v. peek \ . and charpat, 'Tti us. a user can call 
machine -language subroutines and expand his computing 
power. 

The basic unit contains the connector needed to support 
system expansion, bul it must be initialized and driven by a 
separate RS-232C card. 

It also contains the 48-key board and cartridge connector. The 
keyboard has 6 dual-function keys that are accessed via a FUNC- 
TION key. 

Commodore 

Commodore Business Machines has two more entries in this 
price category, the PI28 and the M. at $595 and $995, respec- 
tively. 

Although it resembles the VIC 20. the Commodore 64 is a far 
more powerful machine. For starters, it has 64K of RAM and 
can handle programs written for the Commodore PET series oi 
computers through the use of a PET emulator. 

The basic unit includes a 65-key keyboard and an 8-bit 6510 
CPU (which is like the 6502 pioneered by CBM. but which has 
more I lines). The 64 is capable of using all of the VIC 20 
peripherals, which is very convenient if you've invested in the 
VIC 20 and are upgrading to the 64. 

The 64 can generate 64 characters and 256 moveable sprites 
(graphics elements). It is also capable of screen magnification 



to 
y 

O 



LU 

9 
o 
< 
rr 





THE BASIS FOR A POWERFUL SYSTEM, the Radio Shack TRS-80Modeim 
can be purchased for as little as S699. 



AMONG THE ADVANTAGES ol the Radio Shack TRS-8Q lam ily ot comput- 
ers Is the wide range of peripherals available for them, such as the printer 
shown here. 

(doubling the size ol the display), and the display is memory- 
mapped, which enables you to place picture elements on the 
screen according to their memory locations (each screen- 
memory location in a memory- -mapped system corresponds to a 
specific position on the display). This is a handy feature for 
computer-driven graphics. 

The computer can be connected to other peripherals through 
either a parallel or serial port. 

The PI 28 is a far more powerful system. Driven by an 
eight-bit 6509. it has been called the third-generation PET series 
by the company. It connects directly to a television set via a 
built-in RF modulator. 

The power of the PI 28 becomes apparent when you consider 
the amount of built-in RAM. 1 2MK. That is more than enough to 
handle almost any function, program, or language. The comput- 
er's power is alwo evident from its graphics capabilities. It can 
generate 16 colors, and the screen resolution is 320 by 200 
pixels, which means high-level graphics. The standard 
alphanumeric display is 40 by 24 lines. 

The standard language is still PET BASIC. 

Again, this is only the starting level of this system. A /.Nd 
board can be added for access toCP/M, and there is a variety of 
printers and disk options available foi it. 

One last comment about the keyboard: it includes 10 user- 
de tniabie special function keys. This is in addition to the 
graphics capabilities of these keys. 

CBM also has another entry in thisprice range, the PIT 4016. 
At S995, this 16K basic computer has graphics capabilities built 
into its keyboard and, like the P/^rS'. it also lias a numeric key pad 
built into its keyboard for quick data entry. It is driven by an 
eight-bit CPU. 

Imsai 

As noted earlier, not all home computers come equipped with 
the familiar CRT. keyboard, and cassette or disk drives Some 
ot them are. little more than the heart of a system — an enclosure, 
motherboard. CPU board (sometimes), and power supply — to 
which you have the option of adding your own memory and 
peripherals. 

One such system is offered by Imsai. It is a totally bus- 
oriented system to which the user adds whatever boards and 
peripherals will best suit his needs. As such, it offers an enor- 
mous amount of flexibility and potential for expansion. 

Available either as a kit— the 1-8080K at $599— or as an 
already-assembled unit— the 1-8080 at S7'W— the 8080 use- an 
eight-bit 8080 (an 8085 can be supplied as an option). The 
standard 8080 comes with a 22 slol 5 100 motherboard and a 
28-amp power supply — enough to support a very powerful 
system, arid Imsai offers a number of options which we'll 
discuss later. No memory is included in the base price, bul it is 
readily available from Imsai and from other manufacturers ol 
v 1 1 in bus products, 

An important 8080 feature is its front panel. With its paddle 
switches and LI-D's. u makes the computer the idea tool fur data 



acquisition and process control in areas where a dedicated de- 
vice is required — and where a terminal and other peripherals 
would be wasted. The front panel can even be used for machine- 
language programming, if desired. 

Furthermore, the front panel is an invaluable debugging too). 
You can work your way through a program stcp-hy-step and sec 
which data, address, and control lines arc active at any point. 
For the experienced programmer, this feature can be more useful 
than a software debugging-program. 

Finally, the front panel can be used to evaluate and debug 
S-100 hardware, such as interface or memory hoards \ 
memory-test program may tell you which part of memory is bad. 
but the front-panel LED's will show you exactly what is — and 
isn't — happening. 

The beauty of this type of system is its expandability. Since 
[he system card cage has so many slots (board connectors), a 
user has many installation choices. He can install more memory 
via 32K and 64K — or larger — RAM cards or he can install a 
disk-controller board and, with CP/M. can run any number ol 
languages and programs. 

A faster system offered by the same manufacturer, the I-S0S5. 
is available for S950. It is identical to the StMJ-series excepi I'm 
the fact that ii uses an eight-bit .HDS5 CPU. rather than the 8080 

The Imsai PCS-H0I5. available for $750 (less memory), is 
similar to the I-H0X5, but has no front panel. Jt is well suited for 
use in a turnkey business system. 

Formula International 

One segment of the market which seems to be generating a 
great deal of controversey is the Apple //-like computer. There is 
one in the $1,500 to $2,000 price category, and there is one in 
this segment of the market, too, called the Pineapple. 

Offered by Formula International, it is a kit which must be put 
together. The CPU is an eight-bit 6502, like the one in the. Apple 
II itself, and it is compatible not only with ihc Apple // operating 
system, but also with its peripherals and programs. (This was 
confirmed by a spokesman for Formula International.) The price 
of the Pineapple is $645. 



MA COM OSI 

M/A-Com-OSI also has an entry in this price category. 
C1P. It uses a 6502 CPU and includes a full keyboard. 



the 




$500-$1000 




SYSTEMS IN A BRIEFCASE, the Panasonic hand-held computers can be 
upgraded to form a complete, portable, computer system. 



Like other types of keyboard computers, this one. offers both 
alphanumeric and graphics video displays. The display can be 
set up as cither 24 by 24 or 1 2 by 48. The computer includes a 
cassette interface and a serial port for use with a modem or 
printer. This S565 machine comes standard with 8K or RAM 

Atari 

Another keyboard-computer is the S899 Atari 800. Unlike its 
less-cxpensivc relative, the 400. this one sports a typewriter- 
style keyboard, rather than a membrane type. 

Driven by an eight-bit 6502B CPU, the Aiari WW features 
Ink or RAM as standard and includes a I (IK ROM operating 
system. BASIC is supplied in the form of a plug-in ROM pack. 
The system is quite powerful. The computer can generate 
inverse video (as can most other systems on the market) and 
offers full screen editing. The basic system includes a built-in 
RF modulator that will turn any television set into a display lor 
the computer. When connected to a color receiver, the WW can 
display 16 colors in 16 intensities. It also features lour in- 
dependent sound-synthesizers for musical tones or game 
sounds. They cover four octaves, and there is irttcmal volume 
control for each one. 

The display, w-hich has a resolution of 320 columns by 192 
rows for graphics work, will display three text modes: 40 by 24 
lines, double-width, and double-heighl characters. There arc- 
also nine graphics modes. 

The power of the Atari 800 system is demonstrated bj its 
BASIC. Atari BASIC is an 8K floating-point language with 
9-digit precision. The BASIC interpreter allows access to both 
the graphics and sound features of the computer, and allows 
calls of machine-language subroutines. The user has access to 
memory and its contents through the peek and poke commands 
Also available is a more powerful Microsoft BASIC h offers a 
greater range of commands and has 14-digit floating-point 
accuracy. The disk -equipped version of (his s\ stem with 32K of 
RAM is required for this option. 

Other languages and programming aids available include 
PILOT, an assembler/editor, a macro assembler, and a program 
text editor. 

Cromernco 

Rounding out this price category is the System Zein at S995, 
from a manufacturer known for business systems. Cromernco. 

Using a ZSvOA with a speed of 4 MM/, thai single board 
computer with three expansion slots is the basis ol a powerful 
system. It comes with 64K of RAM. although all peripherals arc 
extra. Since it is an S-100-hus computer, it can he expanded 
greatly using boards from Cromernco or other manufacturers. 

Though this rounds out our look at specific systems in this 
category, remember thai most ol the inexpensive systems men 
tioned in the previous category, like the Explorer 85, can easily 
reach this price level when peripherals are added. B-E 



O 
o 

w 
m 

33 

to 

CD 

rs) 



FOR ONLY $129' 95 Learn Computing] 
From The Ground Up 



Build a Computer kit thai grows 
with you, and can expand to 64k 
RAM, Microsofl BASIC, Tfext Edi- 
tor/Assembler, Word Processor, 
Floppy Disks and more. 

EXPLORER/85 

Here's ihff low oo« 1 wajr Id leafti ihe fundaments li a( com- 
pulling. it* iJi-impatUfii basics vou'Ll need more and 
marc as you idvtnc* in compuier skills. For f,uil SI !S 99 
you gH lh* sdvs need -design EupkrenrfflS motherboard, 
with al! 1 hi" ftssEures yw* BWl lo !r jr r, hnw 10 nmle. And 
use- program And ■! an flrow mlo 4 ayslrm rhal 11 a 
match far my pentflu] computer on Ihe market Uwh ■! 
Iheie teiluTti I'ws GflfllJsJI . |, -.-.-i-"^.int Lfnll< "hr 
microprocessor "hrai-i" of 1h»; Explorer/is [loin Eh* 
milk™ who wj[I buy and u>e the HMi'i.MftV ih.it year 
Alone 1 ] f mrr fl-Jw I pfu% rwwr 6- hi r 1 nputfoulpui porn from 
w hkh you can i n puEindoul put your prog ranu nwrlln 
coulrot frxmriior swi'i hm. relays. (Lihlv etc t utaetu 
interface- thai Id* -bin ■ rtn im! Knd pros; rami you've 
learned lo wnir it\-\uxn 2, Odd hi, ir npr-nrnj; 

sysleWmoniJ nr main |1 r.av let Warn compulinsj in 
icvcnl imporlanl wavs * El sllows iirnpliir. fairer wril- 
ing and enlerirm of programs • It permits ace*** by y^iu 
to all pans of the system w you can check on the stslus. af 
any petal in ihe profraffi • n albowi tncirtft wh pra- 
sjram tlep fay tlep. with prramian Tor display- mi. ill the 
content* of the CPU [ref iisler? floes etc) * and H 
does much more 1 

You fn all ihii in Ihe itamrisj level (Level A] of the 
Explorer/Its f«r only IlltJ.tS. I nef edible 1 To uie. iu*r 

iptci.i1 qf[erc below. 



Klujr in your flVTJi 
eyooi rd/d i iplay - 



if you don'l have them. see n-jr 



□ bevel A computet kii (itmunil Verawnl Sia.lK 

SlusftPal.' 
I Level A kil [Km Keypad /Dupl ay vertwrn Ita.K 
phis Ji Pa I * 

LEVEL !■ — This "building block convent Ihe mpiJwr- 
hoard inio a two-itol S1.O0 out [industry Hands rd) com.. 
puter. New ypu C4A plug in any of ihe hundred! or SlDO 
cardt a vn libit 

O V-vH B kil J4*.M plus i- Pal." 
D SlDQ but connvclDn fiwo required} 14JH each 



LEVEL C— Add mil mo™ 

co7ipunr,n power, thu ' buud- 

ing block" muunli dtredly on 

the motherboard and expands 

the SlDO but to *m itoli 

G Level C ki! . UMa ptui 12 

Pftl." 

□ 51QQ hm connrclon (Five 

required) »i 65 each. 



LEVEL D — When yuu rrarh. ]Se pomi in leaminfj thai re- 
quirti more memory, we iff iwd choice rnhcradd*k 
or a metnory directly on lhtr inul hetboaid. or add Iftk lo 
Hi of memory by meant ol .< tingle 510G 01 rd uur f. inran 
|AW&" 
LeveJ kil: (CHECK ONE| Q 4knn.tx,.,r,i H1» 

elun E Ptr; □ lAk 51GO '-|AW3 .. 4141.10 ph» S2 
»[* : D Ml S IPfl ■ j AVV5 ' , tlHUH ptui $2 Pa IV *Sl 
SIM ■■|AWS" KHt.M plut S2 Pal". □ «l SlDG 

"[AWS- 13H9S ptui *2 PlV 
LEVEL E — An importanl ■' buudi W bhauV. 1 1 adivalei 
iheBkROM.EPR.DMi.paceur.lhemci'hpfhnjrLS Sow juir 
ptuaj in qui Ik MicroaofE BASIC or yinir «wn oultORI 
ptOjtrami 

D Level £ kil . . UM plut SO* Ph\ ' 
fedftBE ,; BASfi — ll * the Eanguajr ih^l Mam you lo 
Ulk tnHliihloyuur compuier" 11 it ji, jiliiilr thnwwayr 
D akuiHUevenionofMKruaQllBlASIC [ruqu irrt Level 
B ind Uk of RAM minimum, we v.i» v a Ifll SlDD 
"|AWS"— are above) 4U.9S poilu,>K| 

□ Ut BOM vertion of Mit.KauJi BASIC irequ Ire* Level B 
*LnrlEancHlRAM, |u»i plusinio wuf Level E kk&ei 
vVeiuQrtl either Ihe 4k Level D RAM t*paft*U3ftnf a 18k 

s-too ■ |AW£ ■ ) m.ts plut S3 Pt r 

D Diik rthiwn of Mitroaon BASIC Irrquim LeveJ B. 
akd RAM, floppy diikconlroller. ft" f^jppy duk drivel 
fM3 poatpald 

TEXT KDrpo EL ASSEMBLER — Tne cditoF^MtembSer 
it * icflwar* lool (a program r detl£ned lo timplily Ihe Hal 
of wnlirtj] jmsfirnmi As your pevitramt become longer 
and more cnnipLrs irn" aju-mbler uut iaie }-pu many 
hour* of programminj IraM Ttiii uftware mdudn an 
editoe pn^gmm thai^ nlen Lht p^fogrami yuu wnte. msket 
chaneet ■^HvrrlhnproeranMonauMltei.Theiuera- 
hler perforim ihe c-rrr-^l ^ik u'. \!xnz\i-,m^ iymholiL 
codr into Ihe compuier- madahlr obJKt oAr.- The editor. 1 ' 
Hwmbler program n availabk- rilher in eaiieile. or a 
ROM veriwn 

Q E-ldilcr/Ajtembler CCttielle urimn requirct Level 
"'B" and Bk (mdn/| of RAM — we ti, &n.\ \Rk ' 1 A ! WS"' — 
tee abo^T] Ssi.h pk» S3 P*J ' 
D £dilor/Asfembter|ROM vfiaabfl ^upplaedon in SUM 
card; fequirei Level Band 4k RAMimm 1— weiuggHl 
eilher Level [>«r j«l fAWS ; Ml] pka S; Pil * 
I" FLOPPY WSK — A rwmarkjfalr huilding hEock 
Add our B' floppy duk when yin. ni^ tl fabler gperatkm 
rnorr convennenl program jtoragf prrhiips * bwHIUaai ap- 
pliLJl iciji a r)d KieiS lu rhr; I Hr rail ly I hi ,1 ivmdt of pruftramt 
and prOfft m language] available i.nl..\. You timply plus 
them mlo >^uf Eiplocrr/BS duk tiVi^m - li accept au 
I BM - formalted CP.'M^rTisiTj.mt 
G ft" J'loppv DlilDnve H»»5 plut SI £ Pi I ' 
C Floppy Com naltet Card ll».«a plut S3 Pal * 
S Duk Drive Cifainrt a: Rxwer SuppK tm *5 plui 
CPU' 

G Our Cablei [set up for I wo dnuevl S29.U plui 
51 » P*l " 

□ CP/M 2 3 Duk Operalmg Syitem. includes Texl 
Ediio.-fAiwrnhlet. dynamic debugger. ,md olher feaiuret 
ihal tin jtiar Explorer/aa kct«i m ihousindt of exbt^nfj 
CP/M-baaed prugrarm 5tM no pottpaid 

NEED A POWER SUPPLY? [ :■ .r^L.'irr our AP V I: ears 

supply all ihe power you need lur a TulEy expanded B\- 

pkst*tfK (noir ditk dm **s havr their awn power hi pplyl 

Ffuslne AP-| fm ™-jilv mm ihealtradrve Explorer jlrH 

cabknel [tee below | 

Q AP-1 Power Supply lil iaV ff Va.mpti indriuKPilpel 

i..h,n"i smfrjp]utS3Pal ' 

NEED A TERMINAL? We 

offer you choicea Ihe least •>£- 

pemive one u cur Hex 

Kfypad^DLipEay kil Ihal :in 

plays Ihe information on a 

calculator. type screen The 

olher choice 11 our ASCTE 

Keyboard/Computer Terminal 

kti lhai ran be used wilheiihtr 



■*£fcv 




i J-lua m Lwd K Anm a 

-■*^ *Tnl\ AflCAuoJT BASIf* flf 

r J'ini! in IVi-imnn v Han ViUttriAsHrmW-t mffitW 

Kl' P prnf CJJryrfl ly ' A iJlJ Trtit .STlW Jsf KinN 

J AlJrf Lfhh'I B In i-iaivFfl in h Aihi j/flu iih*t» 1 ustoni err 

fiJOfl I lltK ■ - -■ ■ '■ ■ ' h ;. .-■ •: urrti , 

• .'.■hi r MA V| ? 1 ..-■■ m i i.T-T|ir,..| 



a CRT monunr or a TVtel \it y% 

3 Hex Keypad/Display kil 



ha^r an Rf modulalorl- 
WMGplu^SZPnl ' 



'- FASTEflU ■ «4 TEflUrNALKIT - f«lur,#vja SSM.tr>' 

ASCII Keyboard i?4 character set upper ma lovrtr cai« 
rsonm nuipui a paud rates 1 So lot 9.100 fiwilcri teleci 
aaiej. RS?1?'C w S5W* e>ulpui a? ot B4 characiar o> 16 
hne lormiH. eofnpino with 
De-iune $l*w\ ClEl-inv! and 
Power Supply 11H,H 

plot D Pur 





G RF Modulator In ? altowi you 10 ute your TV wn as a 

monitor) BJS posEpaid 

D 12" Vidro Momlor -:ioMHi bandwidlhl Sl3tJH 

plusSa I 1 * I * 

f J Deluxe Sleel Cabitvil for ibn 

ExplorerSU Ht.sd plu^ 



'• -• ;: i> 

D Fan for eabln 
ptusSlSdPll' 



*■■■'■■:<• 




ORDER A SPECIAL-PRICE 

EXPLORER/85 PAR— THERE'S 

ONE FOR EVERY NEED. 



□ ftffuUK* Hk <5an.-e SMOO] — You gej Level A iTer- 
mir.al Version] with MofliloJ Source LjlUOpi |£35 vjIijpi 
API. Samp power tupply. Inlet BOSS Uteri Manual 
IRee. S10B9S1 SPEC I AL J 169.9ft plut SM Pal * 
U bscriaerjte^ Fak [Save SS3-.40] — You gel Level A 
iH^x Keypad^Dnpl»y Vnnionl *"'h He* Keypadf 
Display. Inlel BOSS User Manual Level A Hex Monilor 
Source Lilting, and AP- 1 ,5-amp power supply (Reg 
iStg Hi 1 SPEC I AL S3 II » olut So P* I ' 
Q Saacial Mkiwh tiASIC 7±k fSwirltOa 001— You gel 
Levels A (Terminal version). B. D (4k RAMI E. Bk 
Microsoft in ROM Enlel WB5 User Manual. Level A Moni- 
lor Source LdsEiruj:. ind AP-1. S-imp power supply 
[Reg U» 70| SPECEALtSMG plut S7 P«[.' 
D Add a Bom-Version Tent Ednor^ Aiscralilcr | Require* 
Irrcii H ar.J D o: SLIXi Memory I Stt.'JS plui II PftJ" 

Sturtrf 5" Ditk Spiera - Includes Level A. B (loppy duk 
cordmller. one CDC B" duk drive (wo-dnvc cable. Iwo 
S100 cannecioes. |uii add your own power mpphet 
cabmets and hardware D |Reg $106500) SPECIAL 
MM.tS plus SI 3 P*l* . Z- KlcSH-ierSj-slem. 41045.95 
plus iu P&E ' O 4Bk Staner System (1(4S.tS plus 5;H 
PflrE ' D 04k Slaner Syiiem 51 145.95 ptuT SI 3 Pal " 
G Addloany of above Explorer sleet cabinet. AP-1 five 
amp. power supply. Level C wilh Iwo Sim connectors. 
disk drive cafaiTirl and power supply. Eweiub<D connec- 
tors for ennnetlirg your prim it and lermlnsl (Ren. 
££Z5 ml SPEC I AL tlR» pluv 5 13 Pa] * 
G CaaipkK IriK Syiti™ WimJ n Tt-iled IUSUM 

ptetaaptl.* 

D Special 4 [.inmpleir Suiiness SofEware Pak (Save 

4525 Ofll — leu.1 udei CP/M 2 3 Mwrosofl BASIC. Cenera3 
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Package (Reg. U 325 ) SPECIAL 9W99.95 poai paid 






Continental Credit Card Buyer* IJgiuaV Connecticut 

TO ORDER 
Call Toll Free: 
800-243-7428 

To Order From Connecticut, 

or For Technical Assistance, 

Call (203) 354-9375 



..!'■ M JS a rtf trademark o J . Digital Reieaicb 



*JJ % F [LJiptrntlrnciiJ vnirtii tldj^f 

SEND ME THE ITEMS CHECKED ABOVE 

Trtal Enclosed [Conn Resident add uln lax) S 

Paid by. 

D .Ptnoftat Check G Cashier "sChecWMpney Older 
□ VESA a MASTER CARD (Gink Mo . . 



■J«*^JETRONICS Research & Development Ltd 

J|^333_LHt;hneld_Koad, New Miiford. CT 1)6776 




ANNOUNCING TWO 
NEW TERMINALS 

Smart* Fast • Graphics • Matching Modem and $295 Printer 

Netfonica announces a state uf Ihe arl 
break) hrough in lerminals, now el prices you 
can ,v ■:■,-.•!? you Cin ijo on- lino wilh dalai-hank ! 
and computur pfione-'lme services. It's all 
yours; ■■eineifonic newgospers." educational 
services. Dow-Jonas stock reports, games, 
roc. , -ies. porsonal compuhmj wiih any I«ve1 
iflnguage. prOflram exchamjos, electronic bul-| 
l&Hin hoards . . . and more every day! M 

Neironios offers two n«w terminals, ooih 
lealure a full 56 hey.' 12a character WP&witor- 
styie k&yboard. baud ralss lo 19.2 kilobaud, a I 
ruggsd sln-frl cabinet and power Supply. Tne 
simplest one, FASTEflM"£V4, is a Id Jlrta by 64 or 32 character do- line um[, wuh a senai 
prmcer port for making hard copy of all Incoming data, and optional provisions for block and 
special character graphites. The ,L smarr version, SMAR:eRMfio.'oiiu'« either H line by 80 
characters per 1in>e or 16 by 40 tharaclera per Fine, it ofl&rs on-SCreen editing with pago-at-a- 
tirne printing, l£.[XK> pixel graphics, line graphics, absolute cursor addressing, underlininff, 
reverse video, one-Hail intenstly and much more . . . simply pEuo them Inio you* Computer or 
our phone modem and be on-line instantly. Use your TV set [RF modulator required] or our 
delux green-phosphor monitor pictured above. For hard copy just add our matched prlnier. 

Price breaklhrougii'1! Own the FASTER-H-64. » complete terminal kit, ready to plug In Tor 
just *1 OT.as or order the SMARTtTRM-eo kit tor jusi $290.9^, ibath available wired and leaced.i 
B« on-line wl|h the mlllion-dolier computers and data aervicis today ... we even supply ihe 
necessary subscription forms 

Mora good news: All the componems m our lerminais are available separately (see 

coupon), so you buy only whal you needM! 

FA$TEflM-B4 . . . DISPLAY FORMAT; 64 or 32 charaeierflrMne by T6 imes . . . 9fl dlaplayable 
ASCII characters (upper & lower case) . . G baud rates: 150, 300, 600, 1200. 2400, 4800, 9600, 
19, 200, [switch "I-) ■ LINE OUTPUT: RS232/C Or 20 ma Current loop - . VIDEO OUTPUT 1 1V 
P/P (FJA RS 170) . . CURSOR MODES: home ft clear screon, erase to end of line, erase cursor 
line, cursor up & down, auto carriage reium/iino feed a) end of line & auto scroMino , . . 
REVERSE VIDEO . BLIUKIHG CURSOR , , . PARITY: of I. even or odd STOP BITS 1 1 1.5 
2 ., DATA SITS PER CHARACTER: 6, fl, 7 or 8 . , CHARACTER OUTPUT 5 by 7 dol malri* 
in a 1 by 12 cell - . . PRINTER OUTPUT: prims all incoming data IK ON BOARD RAM 
2K ON BOARD ROM . . CRYSTAL CONTROLLED COMPLETE WETH POWEH SUPPLY 
OPTIONAL GRAPHICS MODE: includes 34 Greek £ malh characters plus 30 special graphics 
characters . , ASCII ENCODED KEYBOARD: 56 k#yrT2S characters. 

SMARTelRM-BO . DISPLAY FORMAT: SO characters by 24 lines or 40 characters by 15 lines 
■2'i ■ :: ^ni.iv.^r, e ASC 1 rdhtuawtars (upoer & tower case) 8 baud rates: 110, 300 oao 1200 2400 
4600. 9600. 1ft. 200. . . LINE OUTPUT: RS232JC Or 20 ma Current loop . VIDEO OUTPUT 1V 
pp (EEA ftS-170, . EDITING FEATURES: inserTrds-lele line. inserlWeleTe charader, for- 
ward^back tab . . LINE OR PAGE TRANSMIT . . . PAGE PRfNT FUNCTION CURSOR POSI 
TlONFNG: up, down, right, lelt, plus absolute cursor posmoning wllh read back . . . VISUAL 
ATTRIBUTES, underline, blink, reverse video, half inlensity. 1 blank . GRAPHICS: 12 000 
pixel resolulion block plus line graphics , . ON-SCREEN PARITY INDICATOR . . . PARITY: ofi 
even or odd. . . STOP HITS; ilObaud 2, an oihers 1 . . . CHAR. OUTPUT: 7 by tl character m 
a by t2 block . . . PRINTER OUTPUT . . 60 OR 50 Hz VERTICAL REFRESH . . . BUNKING 
BLOCK CURSOR . . . CRYSTAL CONTROLLED . . . 2K ON BOARD RAM . . . ASCII ENCODED 
KEYBOARD 56 keyfiSS character . . . 4K ON BOARD ROM . . COMPLETE WITH POWER 
SUPPLY 

TELEPHONE MODEM 103 OfA . . FULL DUPLEX, FCC APPROVED DATA RATE: 300 baud 
. . . INTERFACE: RS232/C end TTY . . . CONTROLS: talUdala swtleh (no need 10 connecl and 
disconneel phone), origmaEa'anawer switch on rear panel NO POWER SUPPLY RE- 
QUIRED. 

ASCII KEYBOARD ASCIIS 56 KEY;i26 CHARACTER ASCh 
EN CODED . . UPPER o. LOWER CASE . . FULLY DEBOUNCED 
2 KEY ROLLOVER . . POS OR NEG LOGIC WITH POS STROBE , 
REQUIRES +5 ft -12V OC [SUPPLIED FROM VIDEO BOARDSl 
PRINTER COMET I '. .-. SERIAL IfO TO 9500 BAUD , 80 
CHARACTER COLUMN 4132 COMPRESSED) . . . 10" TRACTOR FEED 1 

UPPEPJLOWER CASE . INDUSTRY STANDARD RIBBONS 
4 CHARACTER SIZES . 9 BY 7 DOT MATRIX Si DIRECTIONAL 
PRINTING 




Continental USA. Credit Card Buyers Outside Connecticut 

CALL TOLL FREE 800-243-7428 

To Order From Connecticut Or For Tech. Assist. Call (203) 354-9375 

NETRONICS R&D LTD. d. p l 

333 Litchfield Road, New MMford, CT 06776 
Plesse send the Herns checked below: 

□ COMPLETE FASTERM-64 TERMINAL (includes FASTVID-64 video board 
ASCII-3 keyboard, steel cabinet and power supply) ... kit $199,95 plus S3 p&l 
. . . wired & tested 1249.95 plus S3 P&l . . , graphics option: add S19.95 to 
each of above 

□ COMPLETE SMARTERM-60 TERMINAL (includes SMARTVID-80 video 
board, ASCII-3 Keyboard, steel cabinet and power supply) ... kit $299.95 plus 
$3 P&l . . . wired and tested $369.95 plus S3 P&l 

n FASTVID-64 VIDEO BOARD (requires +5 & -12V DC) .kit $99.95 plus $3 

P&l . . . graphics option add $19.95 . . . wired & tested $129.95 plus S3 P&l 

oraphics option add S19.95 

L SMARTVID-80 VIDEO BOARD [requires +5 & +M2V DC) . . kil $199 95 

plus S3 P&l . . . wired & tested $249.95 plus $3 P&l 

C. DELUXE STEEL TERMINAL CABINET . . . $19.95 plus S3 P&l 

□ ASCII-3 KEYBOARD (requires +5& -12VDC) ... kit $69.95 plus S3 P&l . .. 
wired and tested S89.95 plus S3 P&l 

□ POWER SUPPLY (powers ASCII-3 keyboard & video boards) ... kit only 
$19,95 plus S2 P&l 

r.: ZENITH VIDEO MONITOR (high resolution green phosphor) . . . wired & 

tested $149.95 plus $6 P&l 

l, TELEPHONE MODEM MODEL 103 OiA . . . wired & tesled $189,95 plus S3 

P&l 

O DOT MATRIX PRINTER Comet I . . . wired & tested $299.95 plus $10 P&l 

□ RF MODULATOR MOD RF-1 ... kit only $6.95 plus SI P&l 

a 3FT-25 LEAD MODEMJTERMINAL OR PRINTEPJTERMINAL CONNECTOR 
CABLE . . . S14.95 ea plus $2 P&l 

For Canadian orders, double the postage . Conn, res, add sales tax. 

Total Enclosed $. 

□ Personal Check □ Cashier's Check/Money Order 

D VISA □ MasterCard (Bank No. J 

Acct. No Exp, Date . 

Signature _^^_ 

Print Name. 

Address 

City 



State 



Zip 



58 









GLOSSARY OF COMMONLY 

For those readers unfamiliar with computer ter- 
minology, we have included the following glossary 
of some commonly used computer terms. 

Address — The label or number identifying the register 
or memory location where a unit of information is stored. 
Applications software — Software written to do a 
specific job, such as solve a mathematics problem, play 
a game, etc. See systems software. 
ASCII BASIC— Acronym for American Standard Code 
for information /nterchange. A seven-bit code used to 
represent alphanumeric characters. It is useful for such 
things as sending information from a keyboard to the 
computer. 

Assembly language— A machine oriented language in 
which mnemonics are used to represent each machine- 
language instruction. Each CPU has its own specific 
assembly language. See CPU and machine language. 
Binary— Refers to the base 2 number system in which 
the only allowable digits are and 1 . 
Bit— Acronym for S/nary digif. The smallest unit of 
compupter information, it is used to represent either a 
binary or 1 . 

Bootstrap— A program that starts the computer and 
prepares it to load other programs into memory. 
Bus — Parallel lines used to transfer signals between 
devices. Computers are often described by their bus 
structure (i.e.— S-100-bus computers, etc.). 
Byte— A group of eight bits. 

CPU— Acronym for Central Processing Unit. The part of 
the computer that contains the circuits that control and 
perform the execution of computer instructions. 
Data base — A large amount of data stored in a well- 
organized manner. A data-base management system is 
a program that allows access to the information. 
Disk — A circular device with a magnetic surface used to 
store data, programs, etc. Floppy (flexible) disks can 
store between approximately 100 to 1000 kilobytes, 
depending on their size (5 1 A or 8 inches), recording 
density and whether both sides of the disk are used. 
Hard (rigid) disks can store upwards of 5 megabytes. 



USED COMPUTER TERMS 

Disk operating system— Program used to transfer in- 
formation to and from a disk. Often referred to as a DOS. 
EPROM— A PROM that can be erased by the user, 
usually by exposing it to ultraviolet light. See PROM. 
File — A collection of data that is treated as a unit. 
Hardware — The physical components that make up a 
computer. 

Hexadecimal — Refers to the base-sixteen number sys- 
tem. Machine language programs are often written in 
hexadecimal notation. 

Machine language — Instructions, written in binary 
form, that a computer can execute directly. Also called 
machine code or object code. 
Microprocessor — A one-tC CPU. One common mic- 
roprocessor often used in personal computers is the 
Zilog Z80. 

Modem — Acronym tor MOduiator/DEModulator. A de- 
vice that transforms electrical signals into audio tones 
for transmission over telephone lines, etc. 
Octal— Base-eight number system. 
PROM — Acronym for Programmable Read Only Mem- 
ory. A semiconductor memory whose contents cannot 
be changed during normal computer operations, but 
that can be programmed under certain special con- 
ditions. 

RAM — Acronym for Random Access Memory. A semi- 
conductor memory that can be both read and changed 
during computer operation. Unlike other semiconductor 
memories, this one is volatile— if power to the RAM is 
cut-off for any reason, all data stored in the device is 
lost. 

Register — A storage location inside the CPU. 
ROM — Acronym for Read Only Memory. A semicon- 
ductor memory containing fixed data — the computer 
can read the data but cannot change it in any way. 
Software— programs. 

System software — Software that governs the comput- 
er's operation or aids in developing other programs. 
Word— Number of bits that are treated as a single unit 
by the CPU. In an eight-bit machine, the word length is 
eight bits; in a sixteen-bit machine, it is sixteen bits. 



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O 

2 

o 

w 

31 

i 

59 






$1000 to$1 500 



If you don't think it's possible to get a powerful 
system at a modest cost, take a look at what is 
available in this price range. 



MARC STERN 

IT'S STILL AMAZING TO MANY Pt.ul'l I THAT St) MUCH COMI'l r- 

ing power can be purchased as inexpensively as it can. As we 
saw in the first part of this survey, there's quite a lot of power 
packed into personal computers that are priced under S 1 000, 
This also holds true between SI 000 and SI 500. 

Apple 

The Apple II and Apple II + . with eight expansion slots, arc 
the basis for a very powerful home or business system, indeed. 
For a base price of SI 330 (for either version of the computer — 
the main difference between the two is in the mathematical 



to 
O 

z 
o 

1 

UJ 



Q 

< 



capabilities of their BASIC'S) you can start with a 6502 -based 
machine with 16K of RAM, expandable to 64K. Both can 
generate color or black-and-white graphics, with a maximum 
resolution of 192 by 280 ( 192 by 140 in color) and include D/A 
converters for game paddles or other external devices. 

We'll cover the Apple computers much more thoroughly later 
on. 

Texas Instruments 

Look at the Texas Instruments TI-99I4A. It is driven by a 
1 6-bit CPU. the TMS-9900. Quite a bit of power is locked into 



TABLE 3— $1000-51500 
Manufacturer 


Model 


Price 


CPU 


Word 

Lenqth 


Disk 
Operating 

System(s) 


Language(s) 




Apple Computer 
20525 Mariani Ave. 
Cupertino, CA 95014 


Apple II, 
Apple II + 


$1330 


6502 


8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 


Atari Home 
Computers 
1192 Borregas 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 


Atari 400 


$1172 


6502B 


8 bits 


N.A 


BASIC, assembly, 
Pilot 




Atari Home 
Computers 


Atari 800 


S1294 


6502B 


8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC, assembly 
Pilot 




Commodore Business 

Machines 

487 Devon Pk. Rd. 

Wavne. PA 19087 


VIC 20 


$1293 


6502 


8 bits 


proprietary 


BASIC 


Commodore Business 
Machines 


Commodore 
64 


$1065 


6510 


8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 


Commodore Business 
Machines 


Commodore 
64 


$1194 


6510 


8 bits 


proprietary, 
CP M(optional) 


BASIC 


MA COM OSI 

7 Oak Pk. 
Bedford. MA 01 730 


OSI, C1P 


$1465 


6502 


8 bits 


N A 


BASIC 




M/A COM OSI 


OSI C4P 


$1025 


6502 


8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 


NEC Home Electronics 

1401 W. Estes Ave. 
Elk Grove, IL 60007 


PC-8001 


$1205 


uPD 780 C-1 


8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC, COBOL. 
FORTRAN, Pascal 




Panasonic 

1 Panasonic Way 

Secaucus, NJ 07094 


RL-1000 


$1103 




8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 




Panasonic 


RL-1400 


$1203 




8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 


Radio Shack 
One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 


TRS-80 

Color 

Computer 


$1002 


6809 


8 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 


Radio Shack 


TRS-80 

Color Computer 


$1401 


6809 


3 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 




Radio Shack 


TRS-80 

Model III 


$1196 


Z80 


8 bits 


N.A 


BASIC 




Sony 

7 Mercedes Dr. 

Montvale. NJ 07645 


SMC-70 


$1475 


280A 


8 bits 


N A 


BASIC 


Texas Instruments 
PO Box 225012 
Dallas, TX 75265 


T1-99/4A 


$1373 


TMS9900 


16 bits 


N/A 


BASIC 

editor assembler 





I 





$1000-$1500 



1 6K'cassette 



5K 



this unit. The software for the computer is supplied by II on 
ROM (flcad Only Memory) cartridges. The software that is 
available includes BASIC, the high-level programming lan- 
guage. 

In this price range, the user has a pretty good norm- system. 
For SI 373, using a cassette recorder for mass storage, the user 
has access to not only network communications — The Source. 
Co mp-U- Serve, etc.— through the RS-232C interface and soft- 
ware, but the user also gains color capabilities through the 
high-resolution color monitor. Hard copy is available with a 



Memory/Storage 


Expansion 


Keyboard 


I/O 


Display 


Comments 


16Kfcassette 
interface 




standard 




40x24 text, 
up to 192x 140 
qraphics 




16K/ca 




57 keys, membrane 


serial, 
parallel 


40 x 24 text, 
up to 320 x 
1 92 graphics 


RS-232C 



61 keys, 
4 special- 
function 



serial, 
parallel 



disk 



66 keys, 4 
user-programmable 



serial, 
IEEE-488 



40 x 24 text. 

up to 320 x 
1 92 qraphics 



22x23 text, 
176x184 graphics 









64 K cassette 
interface 




64 keys, 4 
user-proqrammable 


serial 


40x25 text, 190 
graphics characters 


■let 


64K/5 >-inch (loppy 
disk 




64-key. 4 
user-programmable 


serial 


40x25 text, 
1 90 graphics 
characters 




8K 




standard 


serial 


24 x 24 or 
48x12 text 




19K 








32 x 64 text, 
256x51 2 qraphics 




32K/cassette 
interface 


Hot 


84 keys. 12-key 
keypad 


serial, 
IEEE-48 


80 x 25 text 
160x200 graphics 


12-inch green 
monitor 


2K 


RS-232C. video 
package 


65-key mini- 
keyboard 


serial 


16x32 text, 
48x64 graphics 


Video RF adapter 


4K 


RS-232C. video 


65-key mini- 
keyboard 


serial 


16 a 32 text, 
48 x 64 qraphics 


Video? 


1 6K cassette 
interface 


16K. 
printer 


53 button -type keys 


serial 


8 colors, 
192x256 graphics 




cassette 
interface 


16K. 
printer 


53 button-type keys 


serial 


8 colors, 
129x256 qraphics 


12-inch 
color CRT 


4K -setie 




65 keys, 

1 2-kev keypad 


parallel, 
serial 


12-inch B&W, 
64 (32) x 1 6 text 




64KJcassette 
interface 




72 keys, 5 
programmable 


serial, 
parallel 






cassette 




standard 




32 x 24 text, 
up to 1 92 x 256 
qraphics 


printer, 
RF Adapter. 



CD 

m 

33 
to 

00 

to 
61 



solid-state primer. Please refer to the previous discussion lor a 
full description of the basic system. 

NEC 

The buyer and user of (lie NEC PC -MX) I will also have a 
pretty powerful home computer system. 

This system includes 32K of RAM and a 12-inch green 
phospher monitor, but uses a cassette recorder for mass storage. 
All of this comes in a package that costs S 1 21 15 

Panasonic 

Handheld computers can gain a lot of power through expan- 
sion and these appear in this price range. The price of the 
Panasonic RL-1000 rises to more than SUM Hi with just the 
addition of communications capability and video display 
capability. For SI 103, the 2K version can be equipped with 
serial communications ability via an RS-232C package. It also 
gains the capability for interfacing with a video display with the 
inclusion of a video-RF package. The more powerful 4K RAM 
RL-1400. with the same capabilities, has a price of SI 203. 

Radio Shack 

When the TRS-SO Color Computer, also using a cassette 
recorder system for mass storage, is configured as a '"student" 
system, its cost rises to SI 002. This system includes Ink of 
RAM. Extended Color BASIC, and line printer, but the user 
must provide his own color monitor. These additions drastically 
increase the capabilities of this system. And. if the user opts for 
the Radio Shack monitor, the price of the complete package rises 
to S 1401. 

Atari 

Both Atari systems, the Atari 400 and the Atari 800. have 
configurations that appear in this price range. When the Atari 
400 is equipped with communications capability via the com- 
plete communications package (including modern and com- 
munications software), and with printer capability, its cpsl rises 
to SI 172.50. A standard TV receiver is used for display pur- 
poses. The same is true of the more expensive Atari 800. 

However, the 800\ capabilities aren't as great in this price 
segment. When equipped with only a printer, the price of the 
Atari 800 rises to S 1 294. It has no communications ability. Both 
systems, incidentally, use cassette mass storage in this price 
range. 

Commodore 

Even the small VIC-20 system takes on some very sophisti- 
cated capabilities in this price range. When a user equips this 
system with a 5'Xi-inch mini floppy disk drive for mass storage, 
gives it communications capability with the addition of the 
RS-232C serial package, and gives it hard-copy output capabil- 
ity with the addition of a printer, then the price of this expanded 
system rises to $1403. 

The Commodore 64. is compatible with all the VIC-20 penph- 



s 



< 
cc 

62 





THE SMC-70 tram Sony is supplied with 64 K of RAM memory. It (S Shown 
here with optional 3,5-inch disk drives and RS-232C interface. 



POTENTIALLY A POWERFUL SYSTEM, the price of the base Apple //from 
Apple tails in this range. 



era) equipment. After all, both systems are made h\ the same 
manufacturer and both are in the same relative price ranee, so 
one can expect this to be true. So. when the Commodore 64. 
which comes with 64K of RAM. is equipped with a cassette 
recorder for mass storage and a printer for hard copy output, the 
price of this system rises in S 1 1)65. It you equip this system w nh 
a S'/i-tnch mini floppy disk drive for mass storage, but delete the 
printer, then the price of this system rises to SI ls>4. 

Radio Shack 

Another system that begins its upgrading in this price spec- 
trum is the TRS-80 Model 111. The "Starter" system, which 
includes 4K of RAM and a line printer, but uses a cassette 
recorder for mass storage . is priced al S 1 1 96. The TRS-80 Model 
III is a Z80-driven all-in-one personal computer that combines 
the CRT. keyboard, and CPU into one terminal-like housing. 

M/A-Com-OSI 

M/A-Com-OSI has two entries in this price range. The C4P. 
the starting point of man\ of this company's s\ stems, is priced at 
SI. 025. That system, as with all a\ this company's other sys- 
tems, use a 6502 microprocessor. 

That price will bring the user 1 9K of memorj as standard and 
disk storage capability. Built into this system are the needed 
video outputs, plus interface capabilities for either a modem or 
printer. 

The system language ol the C4P is a BASIC interpretor. The 
operating system for this machine is the company's proprietary 
OS-65D. 

The second system offered b\ M A-Cont-OSl is the more 
complete CIP-MF-20K . Costing S1465 and driven by the same 
type of processor, this system features a full built-in keyboard 
and SK of RAM l his system, programmable in BASIC, can be 
expanded to include dual, minifloppy disk drives and 32K of 
RAM. This system includes interface capabilities for a printer, 
cassette and CRT. 

Sony 

Not all the systems appearing in this price range are only 
system upgrades, some are the foundation upon which very 
powerful systems will be built in the higher price categories. 

The Sony SMC-70, which eventually, becomes a very power- 
ful system as it moves through our pricing categories, has its 
roots here ai SI 475. 

The SMC-70 is another of the keyboard-computers on the 
market. In this form, it includes nothing more than the kej board 
and computer with 64K of RAM As you can see. it's a powerful 
system from the start. It is is driven by a high-speed ZROA 
processor with clock speed of is 4.U2X MHz Though the high- 
level language Sort) BASIC, this system will also recognize and 
run the industry standard CP/M operating s\ S T t , m . This is an 
attractive feature because it puts many CP .VI -based software 
packages at the user's fingertips R-E 









> 



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COMPUTER 

FUNDAMENTALS 




FOUNDATIONS OF COMPUTER 
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Thorough introduction to comput- 
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BASIC: FUNDAMENTAL 
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GUIDEBOOK TO SMALL 
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COMPUTER LANGUAGE 
REFERENCE GUIDE 

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PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING — 

GENERAL 



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FUNDAMENTALS 

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EXPERIMENTS IN ARTIFICIAL 
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THE S-100 AND OTHER MICRO 
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Ml* 

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TV TYPEWRITER COOKBOOK 

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TOOGfiAMMERS 
NOTfBOOK 




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A valuable book with many time- 
saving BASIC subroutines and pro- 
gramming practices usually known 
only to highly experienced program- 
mers. Also contains several de- 
bugged and easily modified pro- 
gram samples. By Earl R. Savage. 

Ask for No, 21841 $1 4 .95 - 

Now $1 1 .96 




THE LOGIC DESIGN OF 
COMPUTERS — AN 
INTRODUCTION 

An informal approach to computer 
logic, beginning with number 
systems, computer design, and 
machine language. You then look at 
a set of basic logic circuits used in 
adders, registers, and counters, and 
see how they connect to form a 
functioning computer. By M. Paul 
Chlnitz. 

Ask for No. 21800 S15.0 5 

Now $12.76 



PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING — 

APPLE' II 



APPLE* FORTRAN 

Only fully detailed Apple FORTRAN 
manual on the market! Ideal for 
Apple programmers of all skill 
levels who want to try FORTRAN in 
a business or scientific program. 
Many ready-to-run programs pro- 
vided. By Brian D. Blackwood and 
George H. Blackwood. 

Ask lor No. 21911 S I £. 9 5 

Now $10.36 



ENHANCING YOUR APPLE 1 II 

Shows you how to mix text, LORES, 
and HIRES anywhere on the screen, 
how to open up whole new worlds of 
3-D graphics and special effects 
with a one-wire modification, and 
more. Tested goodies from a 
trusted Sams author! By Don Lan- 
caster. 

Ask for No. 21846 S1 S .0 S 

Now $12.76 



CIRCLE 96 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



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APPLE INTERFACING 

Brings you real, tested interfacing 
circuits that work, plus the neces- 
sary BASIC software to connect 
your Apple to the outside world. 
Lets you control other devices, 
monitor many events, and com- 
municate with other computers, 
modems, serial printers, and more! 
By Jonathan S. Titus, David G, 
Larsen, and Christopher A. Titus. 

Ask for No. 21862 810.95 

Now $8.76 




APPLE' ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE 

Shows you how to use the 3-charac- 
ter, 56-word vocabulary of Apple's 
6502 to create powerful, fast-acting 
programs! For beginners or those 
with little or no assembly language 
programming experience. By Marvin 
L De Jong. 

Ask for No. 21894 **535- 

Now S12.76 




APPLESOFT® LANGUAGE 

Only complete text available on 
Applesoft BASIC! Self-teaching for- 
mat simplifies learning and lets you 
use what you learn FAST. Ideal for 
businessmen, hobbyists, and pro- 
fessionals! Many programs in- 
cluded. By Brian D. Blackwood and 
George H. Blackwood. 

AsklorNo-21811 $ 10. 9 5 

Now $8.76 




INTIMATE INSTRUCTIONS IN 
INTEGER BASIC 

Explains flowcharting, loops, func- 
tions, graphics, variables, and more 
as they relate to Integer BASIC. 
Used with Applesoft Language, It 
gives you everything you need to 
program BASIC with your Apple II or 
Apple II Plus. By Brian D. Black- 
wood and George H. Blackwood. 

Ask for No. 21812 .-$ft95- 

Now S7.16 




MOSTLY BASIC: APPLICATIONS 
FOR YOUR APPLE 1 II, Book 2 

Now, a second goldmine of fas- 
cinating BASIC programs for your 
Apple II, featuring 3 dungeons, 11 
household programs, 6 on money or 
investment, 2 to test your ESP level, 
and more — 32 in all! By Howard 
Berenbon. 

Ask for No. 21864 .-$4fc95- 

NOW 110.36 




MOSTLY BASIC: APPLICATIONS 
FOR YOUR APPLE 5 II, Book 1 

The original collection of twenty- 
eight debugged, fun-and-serious 
BASIC programs you can use im- 
mediately on your Apple II. Includes 
a telephone dialer, digital stop- 
watch, utilities, games, and more. 
By Howard Berenbon, 
Ask for No, 21789 £12.3 5 



Now $10.36 




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CIRCUIT DESIGN PROGRAMS 
FOR THE APPLET! 

Programs quickly display "what 
happens if" and "what's needed 
when" as they apply to periodic 
waveform, rms and average values, 
design of matching pads, at- 
tenuators, and heat sinks, solution 
of simultaneous equations, and 
more. By Howard M. Berlin. 

Ask for No. 21863 .....$ 1 5 .95 

Now $12.76 

PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING — 

COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 64 USER'S GUIDE 
Shows you how to set up, program, 
and operate your Commodore 64, in- 
cluding how to do arcade-type color 
animation, music, and sound ef- 
fects. Same book that comes 
packed with every Commodore 64 
computer! By Commodore Com- 
puter. 

Ask for No. 22010 $ 12.9S 

Now $10.36 

SUPERPET: WATERLOO 
MICROCOBOL© 

Explains use of various micro- 
COBOL program statements, files 
and file types, tables, and string 
manipulations. Includes many 
examples, plus use of the interac- 
tive debugger. By Commodore Com- 
puter. 

Ask for No. 21909 *9t95 

Now $7.96 




VIC 20 PROGRAMMERS 
REFERENCE GUIDE 

An easy-to-use, detailed manual 
that helps you program your VIC 20 
like a pro in either BASIC or 
machine language! Includes a 
special section on VIC 20 I/O opera- 
tions, too. By Commodore Com- 
puter. 

Ask for No. 21948 . $16.9 5 

Now $13.56 




COMMODORE SOFTWARE 
ENCYCLOPEDIA (2nd Edition) 

Comprehensive software directory 
for the Commodore PET, including 
business, educational, games, firm- 
ware, and more — 10 categories In 
all. Updated regularly. By Com- 
modore Computer. 

Ask for No. 21944 -S9S& 

Now S7.96 




MOSTLY BASIC: APPLICATIONS 
FOR YOUR PET*' 

Brings you 28 assorted fun-and- 
serious BASIC programs for your 
PET, each one complete with an ex- 
planation, a sample run, and a list- 
ing. All are debugged and ready to 
go. By Howard Berenbon. 

Ask for No. 21730 .5 10-0 6 

Now $10.36 



jSfaong 




PET 11 INTERFACING 

Provides you with unique informa- 
tion about interfacing the PET 
through each of its different output 
ports by means of a BASIC program 
and a custom interface you can 
build yourself. Has complete hard- 
ware and software instructions. By 
James M. Downey and Steven M. 
Rogers. 

Ask for No. 21795 . 816.05 

NOW $13.56 



CIRCLE 96 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING — TRS-80 a 



REAL-TIME CONTROL WITH 
THE TRS-SO® 




SUPERPET SYSTEM OVERVIEW© 

Looks at SuperPET fundamentals 
from hardware to Waterloo micro- 
software, including the Waterloo 
microEditor. By F. D. Boswell, T. R. 
Grove. K. I. McPhee, J. B. Schueler, 
and J. W. Welch. 

Ask for No. 21903 $535- 

Now $4.76 




SUPERPET: WATERLOO 
MICRO BASIC© 

Introduces you to the general fea- 
tures of microBASIC first, then 
takes a detailed look at the com- 
mand and programming languages. 
Three appendixes, one of which 
covers file handling. By J. W. 
Graham and K. I. McPhee. 

Ask for No. 21906 $+035 

Now S8.76 




SUPERPET: WATERLOO 6809 
ASSEMBLER© 

Provides you with all elements 
necessary to develop and debug 
programs in 6809 assembly lan- 
guage for the SuperPET. Contains 
tutorial examples and details of the 
6809 Assembler and development 
systems. By D. D. Cowan and M. J. 
Shaw. 

Ask lor No. 21908 .8 1 10.0 5 

Now SB.76 



SUPERPET: WATERLOO 
MICROAPL© 

Your complete tutorial and refer- 
ence manual for this powerful, con- 
cise language that's ideally suited 
for data analysis, data base ap- 
plications, and data communica- 
tions. By J. C. Wilson and T. A. 
Wilkerson. 

Ask for No. 21907 mOS- 

Now $7.96 




SUPERPET: WATERLOO 
MICROPASCAL© 

Simple examples help explain this 
interpretation of the language, and 
a reference section covers syntax 
and semantics. Also discusses the 
Waterloo microEdlt program, a full- 
screen text editor. By F. D. Boswell, 
T. R. Grove, and J. W. Welch. 

Ask for No. 21905 S10.0S 

Now $8.76 




SUPERPET: WATERLOO 
MICROFORTRAN© 

Gives details and many examples 
of this FORTRAN dialect used In 
educational and research environ- 
ments. Includes a complete refer- 
ence section. By P. H. Oirkson and 
J. W. Welch. 

Ask for No. 21904 *»r95 

Now $8.76 



u. 



Shows how to use your TRS-80 for 
sophisticated, low-cost control of 
mechanical or electrical devices. 
Only an ordinary knowledge ol 
Level II BASIC is needed, and no 
computer modification is neces- 
sary. Provides everything you need, 
including where to find the sensors 
and actuators. By Russell M. Genet. 

Ask for No. 21831 S1 4 .9& 

Now $11.96 

USING THE Z-80 IN THE TRS-80* 

Shows you how to access the 
powerful Z-80 in the TRS-80 models 
I and III. Learn the Z-80 instruction 
set, Its TRS-80 implementation, 
hardware, software, and more. 
You'll need ready access to a 
TRS-80 model I or III. By Elmer Poe. 

Ask for No, 21839 .$ 13.9 5- 

Now $11.16 




INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING 
FOR THE TRS-80 1 Model I 

Shows you how to do more with 
Level II BASIC. Then, leads you 
gradually from BASIC into as- 
sembly and machine-language pro- 
gramming on the TRS-80 Model 1. 
Many operating details and pro- 
gramming tips neglected else- 
where. By David L. Heiserman, 

Ask lor No. 21809 S&9S- 

Now $7.96 



MOSTLY BASIC: APPLICATIONS 
FOR YOUR TRS80*, Book 2 

Now, a second goldmine of 32 all- 
new BASIC programs! Includes 3 
dungeons, 11 household programs, 
7 on money and investment (includ- 
ing 3 on the stock market), 2 that 
test your ESP level, and more. Com- 
plete with explanations, sample 
runs, and listings. By Howard 
Berenbon. 

Ask lor No. 2186S $12.9 5 

Now $10.36 




MOSTLY BASIC: APPLICATIONS 
FOR YOUR TRS-80*, Book 1 

The original assortment ol 28 fun- 
and-serlous, debugged BASIC pro- 
grams for your TRS-80, all of which 
are ready to run. Complete with ex- 
planation, sample run, and listing 
for each program. By Howard 
Berenbon. 

Ask for No. 21788 $ 1 B . 9 5 

Now $10.36 




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TRS-80* ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE 
MADE SIMPLE 

Learn how to plan, write, and hand- 
assemble your own assembly lan- 
guage programs in memory, using 
the T-BUG and Level II BASIC ROM 
subroutines. Provides immediate, 
short-cut results for the user who 
can simply use existing routines. 
By Earles McCaul. 

Ask for No. 218S1 . 813.0 5 

Now $10.36 




TRS-80* INTERFACING, Book 1 

Introduces you to the various I/O 
signals of the TRS-80 and suggests 
their use in a number of practical 
circuits. Many interesting experi- 
ments for those with a fairly good 
understanding of Level II BASIC. By 
Jonathan A. Titus. 

Ask for No. 21633 $10.9 5 

Now $8.76 



CIRCLE 96 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



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TRS-80* INTERFACING, Book 2 

Gives you a number of advanced 
ways to use the knowledge from 
Book 1, Including generation of con- 
trol voltages and currents, driving 
high-voltage and high-current loads, 
and many more. Complete software 
furnished. By Jonathan A. Titus, 
Christopher A. Titus, and David G. 
Larson, 

Ask for No. 21739 $11.05 

Now $9.56 
For both books, 

ask for No. 21765 . S20 - .Q5 

Now $16.76 




TRS-80 8 — MORE THAN BASIC 

Learn to program in Z-80 mne- 
monics, using more than 26 avail- 
able (and changeable) commands. 
Interactive monitor program auto- 
matically flags incorrect Instruc- 
tions or commands and turns your 
TRS-80 into a cost-effective 
development system! By John Paul 
Froehllch. 

Askfor No. 21813 $10. % 

Now $8.76 



CIRCUIT DESIGN PROGRAMS (, 
FOR THE TRS-80 1 - 



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Provides you with a number of Level 
II BASIC programs to use during de- 
sign and analysis of electronic cir- 
cuits. Each one can also be used as 
a subroutine inside of a larger pro- 
gram if you wish, and all are ready 
to run. By Howard M. Berlin. 

Ask for No. 21741 .$ 1 4 . 5 

Now $11.60 



PROGRAMMING AND 

INTERFACING — 16-BIT 
MICROPROCESSORS 




16-BIT MICROPROCESSORS 

Carefully steps you through the 
complexities of programming and 
designing with powerful 16-bit 
microprocessors. Covers the 68000, 
8086, Z80OV2, 9900, and NS16000. 
By Christopher A, Titus, Jonathan 
A.Titus, Alan Baldwin, W. N. Hubin, 
and Leo Scanion. 

Ask for No. 21 805 $15.0 5 

Now $12.76 



u. 



THE 68000: PRINCIPLES AND 
PROGRAMMING 

Systematically guides you through 
the 68000's complex architecture, 
instruction set, pinouts, and Inter- 
facing techniques. Excellent for de- 
sign engineers, programmers, and 
students. By Leo J. Scanion. 

Ask for No. 21853 $14.90 

Now $11.96 



PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING — 6502 
MICROPROCESSORS 




6502 SOFTWARE DESIGN 

Shows you how to place the power- 
ful 6502 under assembly language 
program control. Contains 88 de- 
bugged and usable sample pro- 
grams, and a wealth of additional 
material. By Leo J. Scanion. 

Ask for No. 21 686 $13. 5 

Now $10.80 




ADVANCED 6502 INTERFACING 

Contains many valuable design 
techniques for machine control 
using the 6502 and 6800 micro- 
processor families. Teaches inter- 
face design, understanding of LSI 
devices, and solutions to typical 
problems encountered. By John M. 
Holland. 

Ask for No. 21836 612.9 5 

Now $10.36 



p«)G^lMIN| 




PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING THE 6502, WITH 
EXPERIMENTS 

Good any time, but excellent if you 
don't have much 6502 assembly lan- 
guage programming or chip-level 
interfacing experience. Simple l<0 
techniques, instructions, and inter- 
facing that can be reinforced by a 
KIM, SYM, or AIM system. By 
Marvin L De Jong. 

Ask for No. 21651 61 6 .0 6 

Now $13.56 



PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING — 6800 
MICROPROCESSORS 



HOW TO PROGRAM AND 
INTERFACE THE 6800 



H 



Introductory tutorial to Motorola's 
popular 6800, emphasizing real- 
world applications. Covers internal 
structure, instruction set, program- 
ming, hardware, and interfacing 
techniques. Many experiments! By 
Andrew C. Staugaard, Jr. 

Ask for No. 21684 $1 5 .0 6 

Now 512.76 




6809 MICROCOMPUTER 
PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING, WITH 
EXPERIMENTS 

Instructional text and applications 
handbook giving you a solid under- 
standing of the 6809 high-per- 
formance chip. Covers all aspects 
and includes much software. By 
Andrew C. Staugaard, Jr. 

Ask for No. 21798 $1 4 .05- 

Now $11.96 



PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING — 8080 
MICROPROCESSORS 




8080A MICROCOMPUTER 
INTERFACING AND 
PROGRAMMING, 2nd Edition 

Teaches you device select pulse 
generation, microcomputer output, 
microcomputer input, and Interrupt 
servicing in the context of 
SOSOA-based microcomputers. 

Helps you understand and develop 
your own interfaces to other digital 
devices. By Peter R, Rony. 

Ask for No. 21933 $17.95 

Now $14.36 



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8080(8085 SOFTWARE 
DESIGN, Book 1 

Gives you a thorough look at as- 
sembly language programming for 
the 8080 or 8085. Has detailed 
coverage of the 8080/8085 instruc- 
tion sets and interfacing tech- 
niques. By David G. Larsen, 
Jonathan A. Titus, and Christopher 
A. Titus. 

Ask tor No. 21541 813.0 5 

Now 510.36 



CIRCLE 96 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



8080/8085 SOFTWARE DESIGN, 
Book 2 

A sequel to Book 1, covering the 
processes of alphanumeric storage 
and system interrupts. Also shows 
you how to write a system monitor 
or debugger lor your microcom- 
puter. By David G. Larsen, Jonathan 
A, Titus, and Christopher A. Titus. 
Ask for No. 21615 S1S.0 5 

Now $10.36 
For both books, 
ask forNo. 21659 $21.9 5 

Now $17.56 



m& 




8085A COOKBOOK 

A design guide you can use to 
develop a number of completely 
operational, low-cost microcom- 
puters around the 8085A chip. Dis- 
cusses support hardware and 
family-compatible chips. By 
Jonathan A. Titus, David G. Larsen, 
and Christopher A. Titus. 

Ask for No. 2169T *4&9S- 

NOW $12.76 



PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING — Z-80 
MICROPROCESSORS 



nSSr 




Z-80 MICROCOMPUTER 
HANDBOOK 

Acquaints you with the hardware of 
the Z-80 and discusses its software 
aspects, including use of machine 
and assembly language. Also looks 
at the microcomputers using that 
chip. By William Barden, Jr. 

Ask for No. 21500 811.05 

Now S9.56 




Z-80 MICROCOMPUTER DESIGN 
PROJECTS 

Even a novice can get first-hand 
Z-80 operations experience! You 
actually build a small but fully 
operational Z-80 microcomputer 
having 2K of EPROM and 128 bytes 
of RAM, program it, check It out, 
and use it in more than 75 pages of 
projects! By William Barden, Jr. 

Ask for No. 21682 $4335 

NOW $11.16 




Z-80 MICROPROCESSOR 
PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING, Book 1 

Introduces you to the Z-80 and its 
machine- and assembly-language 
software. Requires NO background 
in computer science, programming, 
or digital electronics. By Joseph C. 
Nichols, Elizabeth A. Nichols, and 
Peter R. Rony, 

Ask for No. 21609 .-$42:95- 

Now $10.36 

2-80 MICROPROCESSOR 
PROGRAMMING AND 
INTERFACING, Book 2 

Covers the interfacing of digital cir- 
cuits with Z-80 CPU. PIO, and CTC 
chips. Assumes you have read Book 
1 or are familiar with Z-80 assembly 
and machine-language program- 
ming. By Joseph C, Nichols, Eliza- 
beth A. Nichols, and Peter R. Rony. 
Ask for No. 21610 $1 5 . 95 

Now $12.76 
For both books, 
ask for No. 21611 -SaSrSSj 

Now S20.76 



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Registered trademark of Blacksburg Group, Inc. Bug symbols indicate the books in the Blacksbutq Continuing Education Series. 



Try Then SAMS Digital Bottoms! 

UNDERSTANDING DIGITAL LOGIC CIRCUITS, No. 21867. $18.95 value. Now 515.16 
DIGITAL LOGIC CIRCUITS: TEST AND ANALYSIS. No. 21799, $16.95 value. NOW SI 3.56 
IC MASTER. No. 21931, $32.50 value. Now $68.00 complete 

Alio Those SAMS Basic Necessities! 

HANDBOOK OF ELECTRONIC TABLES AND FORMULAS. No. 21532, $11.96 value, Now $9.56 
TUBE SUBSTITUTION HANDBOOK, 21st EdiliOn, No. 21748, S4.95 value. Now $3.98 
MODERN DICTIONARY OF ELECTRONICS, No. 21314. $22.95 value. Now SIB. 36 

HOW TO READ SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS, 3rd Edition, No. 21127. S7.5D value. Now S5.99 
TELEVISION SYMPTOM DIAGNOSIS. 2nd Edition. No. 21460, $10.95 value, Now S8.76 
TROUBLESHOOTING WITH THE OSCILLOSCOPE. 4th Edition No J173B. $10.96 value. Now 
S8.76 



IMPORTANT - HERE'S HOW TO ORDER 

1 . Look through the Sams Book listings in this ad and lind the books that lit your interests or 
the Interests of someone you know. 

2. To get your books at this special discount, and in the shortest possible lime, complete and 
mail Ihe handy order card attached. It the order card is missing, send us Ihe order lorm on Ihis 
page or staple it to your purchase order. 

3. Charge your books to your MasterCard or Visa account, or include your check or money 
order for the lull amount due. Be sure to add $2 tor handling. 

4. It you'd rather order by phone, call Ihe Sams Order Desk at 800-428-3696 toll-tree or 

317-293-5566 and charge it to MasterCard or Visa. Give the Order Desk operator the code 
number in Ihe box al lha bottom of the order lorm when she asks lor It. Order Desk hours are 
8:00 AM to 4; 30 PM Monday thru Friday. EST (lie year 'round 

5. Mall your eraer to: 
HOWARD W. SAMS $ CD., INC. 

4300 W. 62N0 STREET • P.O. BOX 7092 

INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46206 



SAMS 20% DISCOUNT SALE ORDER FORM 


Catalog No, 


Qty. 


Special Price 


Total 


Catalog No. 


Qty. 


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Total 


















































































































































































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Alt books available Irom Sams distributors, boc 


1982. Prices subject to change without n 
fcstores, and computer stores naticnwi 


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toward W. S 


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:., Inc., 4300 W. f 


12nd — P.O. 


Box 7092. Indiar 


spoils 


Indiana 46208 


| X0349 1 



CIRCLE 96 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



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SPECIAL COMPUTER Sale Price! 




• Best Service In the USA! 

• One Day Delivery Express 
Mall 

• Most In Stock Accessories 

• Over 500 Programs To 
Choose From 

• Educational-Business- 
Home-Game Programs 

• Immediate Refunds 

• Free Catalogs 

• We Love Our Customers! 



FOR THE SPECIAL SALE PRICE OF 
$259.00. you get the COMMODORE 
VIC-20 computer plus WE ADD 3000, 
BYTES OF MEMORY to give you 60% 
MORE PROGRAMMING POWER! This 
powerful fullsized extra featured com- 
puter includes the 6502 microprocessor 
(LIKE APPLE) 20.000 bytes ROM with a 
16K extended LEVEL II Microsoft BASIC, 
8000 bytes RAM plug in expandable to 
32,000 bytes RAM, 66 key typewriter pro- 
fessional expanded keyboard with 
graphic symbols on keys, color com- 
mand keys, high resolution graphics, 512 
dispfayable characters, text display is 22 
lines 23 characters, sound and music, 
real time, upper tower case, full screen 
editing cursor, floating point decimal and 
trig functions, string arrays, scrolling, 
multi statement lines, file managment, 
PEEK AND POKE. Assembly machine 
language is available. We have easy to 
use self teaching books and programs. 
Accept TAPE-DISK-PLUG IN CART- 
RIDGES, connects to any TV, includes 
AC adaptor, R.F. modulator, switch box, 
self teaching instruction book, comes in 
a beautiful console case for ony $259.00. 

LOW COST PLUG IN EXPANSION 

Expansion accessories plug directly into 
this computer, extra RAM memory, Con- 
trollers, a Cassette, A Telephone Modem 
for only $109.00, an 80 Column Printer for 
$349.00, even the 170K Disk Drive plugs in 
direct. You do not have to buy an expen- 
sive expansion interface. 

WHYSUCHALOW PRICE 
WE GIVE YOU 60% to 400% MORE PRO- 
GRAMMING POWER THAN VIC-20! You 
can't beat our prices for the VIC-20 with 
increased programming power added! 
We sell direct to customers. We save 
you the profit margin normally made by 
computer stores, department stores, ,and 
distributors. We are willing to take a 
smaller margin to develop volume! 

INVEST IN YOUR CHILDREN 

Educate your children while they play. 
Every kid wants to play electronic games. 
(We have some of the best). The next 
natural step for their curiosity is to try 
simple programming. They can do this in 
20 minutes with our simple self teaching 
instruction book. High schools are 
teaching computer math, science and pro- 
gramming - some start in grammar school. 



If you provide this computer as a 
Teacher and Tutor at home, before you 
know it your child will be writing com- 
puter programs. We have over 500 pro- 
grams to choose from!! More than 270 
educational tapes, complete coverage of 
small business and home programs, plus 
a wide variety of the best games! Why 
pay $140,00 to $295.00 for an electronic 
game or $100,00 for a 2K toy computer 
with a flat plastic keyboard? When you 
can buy this powerful extra featured 
computer tor only $259.00. 

IMMEDIATE REPLACEMENT WARRANTY 

If your computer fails because of warranty 
defect within 90 days from date of pur- 
chase, you simply send your computer to 
us via United Parcel Service prepaid. We 
will "immediately" send you a replace- 
ment computer at no charge via United 
Parcei Service prepaid. No one we know 
gives you this kind of warranty service. 
Most computer warranty service takes 30 
to 90 days to handle - this fantastic "im- 
mediate replacement warranty" is backed 
by COMMODORE COMPUTER, a MAJOR 
national brand electronics manufacturer. 

TELEPHONE MODEM SALE $109 

Plug in your VIC telephone modem. Now 
you can get a world of information 
through your telephone, plus electronic 
mail. Just dial up the information you 
want. UP) wire service, stock market, 
historical information by topic from over 
60 magazines, including New York 
Times. Airline information, order tickets, 
get weather information anywhere in the 
world, restaurant and hotel information, 
thousands of categories are on line for 
you, business, finance, education, enter- 
tainment, games etc. YOU'LL BE THE 
TALK OF YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD. Our 
telephone modem price is only $109 and 
includes FREE! one year network 
membership and one hour on line! 

SPECIAL SALE PRICE S259.00 
FOR ONLY $259 you get the POWERFUL 
28K COMMODORE VIC with 60% MORE 
PROGRAMMING POWER THAN VIC-20! 
28,000 bytes total memory (20,000 bytes 
ROM, 8000 bytes RAM and extended 
LEVEL II BASIC), the professional 66 
keyboard, color, sound, music self 
teaching instruction book, A.C. adaptor, 
R.F. modulator, T.V. switch box, owners 
manual plus all the other features listed, 
inabeautiful console. 



SPECIAL SALE PRICE $339 
FOR ONLY $339 you get the 41 K COM- 
MODORE VIC with 400% MORE PRO- 
GRAMMING POWER THAN VIC-20! We 
add 16,000 bytes memory to the VIC-20. 
You get a total of 41,000 bytes memory 
(20,000 bytes ROM, 21.000 bytes RAM 
and extended LEVEL II BASIC) plus all 
the extra features shown for the 28K 
COMMODOREVIC. 

60K EXPANSION MODULE SALE $109 

SWITCH SELECTABLE - 6|SLOT -RESET 
EXPANSION MODULE allows memory ex- 
pansion to 60K. You can add up to 6 
cartridges, switch select any program 
you desire, stop and start programs with 
reset button, not necessary to remove 
cartridge or turn off computer, saves 
time, television and computer (one year 
warranty). 

15 DAY FREE TRIAL 



DON'T MISS THIS SALE -ORDER NOW 

i — | Please send me the 28K 
' — '■ Commodore VIC Computer for 
$259.00 

I I Please send me the 41K 
— Commodore VIC Computer for 
$339.00 

Telephone Modem $109.00 

j 60K Expansion Module $109.00 

We ship C.O.D. and honor Visa and 
Master Card. 

Name 

Address 



City _ 
State . 



.Zip Code. 



DVISA D MASTERCARD □ C.O.D. 
Credit Card No. 



Expiration Date 

Add $10.00 for shipping, handling and In- 
surance. Illinois residents please add 
6% tax. Add $20.00 for CANADA, PUER- 
TO RICO, HAWAII orders. WE DO NO EX- 
PORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES. 
Enclose Cashiers Check, Money Order 
or Personal Check. Allow 14 days for 
delivery, 2 to 7 days for phone orders, 
1 day express mail! 
Canada orders must be in U.S. dollars. 




commodore VIC 
experts!! 

CIRCLE 5 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




ENTERPRIZES < FACT0RY di p ecT) 

BOX 550, BARRINGTON, ILLINOIS 60010 
Phnnn 31 9/3R?-<i2dd tn order 



$1500 to $2000 




$1500-$2000 



Among the highlights of this 
price range are fully 
configured versions of 
low-end computers and 
basic versions of 
high-powered systems. 

MARC STERN 



ONE THING A LOOK AT THE PRICES OF PERSONAL COMPl 1 1 Ks 

will tell you is there a lot of them in the low-to moderate 
price-range and a lot in the upper price ranges, but the middle 
ground, starting around SI 500 is relatively empty. 

It is in this area, though, that some very powerful systems 
have their origins and some very powerful computer firms enter 
the competition . It is also here that lower-end computer systems 
begin to stretch their legs. 

The name IBM first makes it appearance here with its SI 565 
Personal Computer. Yes — IBM sells a computer for less than 
$1600. 

In its standard configuration, the Personal Computer, or PC. 
consists of a 16-bit, SOSS-based computer with 16KofRAM In 
this entry-level version, it is possible for a user to load and save 
BASIC programs using a cassette recorder. Those programs are 
entered through an X3-key detachable keyboard . which ah" has 
a 10-kcy keypad for rapid data entry, and 10 function keys. 

The system has 40K of ROM. which contains the operating 
system, BASIC, and instructions for performing complex 
graphics functions. It can generate 16 foreground colors and 
eight background colors. There is also a built-in speaker fur 
sound generation. 

The Personal Computer PC is a modular unit, and a user is 
able to expand it extensively in building-block fashion, as wc 
shall see later. 

Olivetti 

Another rioted equipment-manufacturer has also entered the 
personal/homc/business-cinnputer field — Olivetti, with its M- 
20. This microcomputer is also a modular unit. 

What you get for an investment of Sl'JSS is a 16-bit machine, 
driven by a Z8001 microprocessor Ibis is one of the first 
personal computers on the market to make use of this powerful 
CPU. 

What's the attraction of a 1 6-bit over and 8-bil CPU? One of 
the key answers is speed. A 16-bit CPU can access data and 
process it much more quickly than an K-hii processor Lsee (li^ 
separate piece on 8-bit vs. 16-bit computers in this section). 
Sixteen-btt machines also tend to run at fairly high speeds, and 
the M~20 is no slouch in that department. 

Straight out of the carton, this is a powerful unit, even with 



few peripherals attached. To give one example, it comes alreadv 
equipped with 128K of RAM. 

The computer runs Olivetti's proprietary PCOS and recog- 
nizes only programs written under that operating system. The 
use of a proprietary operating system can be a drawback fur the 
potential user because, unless he opts for the CP/M emulation 
disk, which will allow him to run CP/M 2.2. or the soon-to-be- 
availablc soft card, which will allow him to run CP/M or 
MS-DOS, he will be limited to programs written specifically for 
this computer. 

The BASIC language in this machine is the powerful BASIC 




THE M-20. from Olivetti, is one of the firs) personal computers to use the 
powerful Z8001 16-bit microprocessor. 



80 and the computer is capable of 256 commands and functions. 
Memory is expandable to 5I2K through the use of plug-in 
expansion boards; there arc five slots on the motherboard for this 
and other purposes. 

The display capabilities of the M-20 are very good. It can 
display cither KO by 25 lines or 64 by 16. The resolution level for 
a color monitor is 5 1 2 by 256 pixels, which makes this machine 
capable of high-lcvci graphics. 

PCOS is a powerful operating system for the computer's dual 
quad-density floppy-disk system. PCOS monitors and manages 
the total system's resources. Not only does it catalogue and 



execute commands and procedures, but it also executes the 
system utilities and calls machine-language routines. Ii can also 
provide security tor data via passwords and can "window" the 
display so onK a small portion can be viewed at a time 

Micro Technology Unlimited 

Micro Technology Unlimited"; MTV-/30 uses a 6502 mic- 
roprocessor and comes with KOK ol built-in RAM. 

It is ;t truly modular system that begins with little more than 
the system box and 96-key keyboard. Irt that configuration, 
external data and program storage is provided by a cassette 
recorder. 



m 
o 

2 

o 

DC 

(- 

o 

LU 

o 

Q 
< 

EC 

74 


TABLE 4— S1 500 -S2000 
Manufacturer Model 


Price 


CPU 


Word 
Lenqth 


Disk 

Operating 

System(s) 


Lanquaqe(s) 




Apple Computer 
20525 Mariani Ave. 
Cupertino, CA 95014 


Apple II 


SI 530 


6502 


8 bits 


N A 


BASIC 




Atari Home 
Computers 
1 265 Borregas 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 


Atari 800 


S1552 


6502 


8 bits 


N.A 


BASIC 




Commodore Business 

Machines 

487 Devon Pk. Rd. 

Wayne. PA 19097 


Commodore 
B128 


$1695 


6509 


8 bits 


proprietary 


BASIC 




Commodore Business 
Machines 


CBM 
4032N 


S1295 


6502 


8 bits 


NA 


BASIC 




Commodore Business 
Machines 


CBM. 
8032B 


$1495 


6502 


8 bits 


N'A 


BASIC 




Commodore Business 
Machines 


Commodore 
64 


S1589 


6510 


8 bits 


proprietary 


BASIC 




Commodore Business 
Machines 


CBM 
8032N 


$1995 


6502 


8 bits 


N.A 


BASIC 




Commodore Business 
Machines 


SuperPET 
SP9000 


$1995 


6809 6502 


8 bits 


NA 


APL, BASIC, 
Pascal, FORTRAN, 
COBOL assembler 




Commodore Business 
Machines 


CBM 
4016 


SI 690 


6502 


8 bits 


proprietary 


BASIC 




Franklin Computer 
Corp. 

7030 Colonial Hwy. 
Rennsauken. NJ 081 09 


Ace 
1000 


$1595 


6502 


8 bits 


N A 


BASIC 




Heath Co. 
Benton Harbor, Ml 
49022 


H-89 


$1895 


Z80 


8 bits 


HDOS. 

CPM (optional) 


BASIC, other 
CPM compatible 




International 
Business Machines 
Box 1328 
Boca Raton. FL 33432 


IBM 

Personal 

Computer 


$1565 


8088 


16 bits 


NA 


BASIC 




MicroTeehnology 
Unlimited, Box 12106 
Raleiqh. NC 27605 


MTU 100 


$1549 


6502 


8 bits 


N/A 






MicroTeehnology 

Unlimited 


MTU 


$1699 


6502 


8 bits 


N A 






MicroTeehnology 

Unlimited 


MTU 130 


$1999 


6502 


8 bits 


NA 






Netronics Research 

333 Litchfield Rd. 
New Milford, CT 06776 


Explorer 
85 


$1530 


8085 


8 bits 


CP.M 


CPM 
compatible 




Non-Linear Systems 
533 Stevens Ave. 
Solana Beach, CA 
92075 


Kaypro II 


$1795 


280 


8 bits 


CP/M 


SBASIC 




Olivetti Corp. 

155 White Plains Rd, 

Tarrytown, NY 10591 


M-20 


$1989 


Z8001 


16 bits 




BASIC 




Osborne Computer 
26500 Corporate Ave. 
Hayward, CA 94545 


Osborne I 


$1795 


280A 


8 bits 


CPM 


CBASIC, 
MBASIC 




Radio Shack 
One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth. TX 76102 


TRS-80 

Color 

Computer 


$1601 


6809 


8 bits 




BASIC 





















The MTV- I40\s operating system is the culled CODOS . and it 
recognizes UCSD-p-System Pascal, the high-level FORTH lan- 
guage. BASIC, and supports an assembler. The video display is 
hii-mapped which makes complex graphics relatively easy. 
Input and output are via two parallel ports and a serial port. 

TtizMTU-130 can he upgraded while still staying within this 
price range by adding a 12-inch green-screen CRT (the base 
price is SI 549: the monitor increases that to SI 699). 

Franklin 

A computer in this category that is the subject of much 



controversy is the Franklin ACE 1000. At SI 595 it isn't much 
more expensive than the Apple //.. .and it's another of the Apple 
look-alikes. 

The ACE 1000 comes equipped with 64K of RAM. Its 
typewriter-style keyboard has 72 keys, and there is also a 12-key 
keypad for number entry. Because of its resemblance to the 
Apple, it is reasonable to assume that hardware and software for 
that computer will also work in the ACE 1000. 

Heath/Zenith 

Heath/Zenith also has an offering in this price category, the 



1 

- 


Memory Storage 


Expansion 


Keyboard 


I/O 


Display 


Comments 




l6K<cassette 




53 keys 




40 x 24 text, 

280 x 192 graphics 






1 6 K. cassette 




61 key. 4 special 
function 


interface 




printer 




128K/dual SVi-lnch 
double-density 
floppy disk 




92-key keyboard, 
10 user- program- 
mable keys, 
19-key keypad 


IEEE-488. 
serial 


80 x 25 text. 
Up to 320 x 200 
graphics 


integral 
display 




32Kcassette 




standard, numeric 
keypad 


IEEE-488 


40 x 25 


integral 
display 




32K/eassette 




standard, numeric 
keypad 


IEEE-488 


80 x 25 


integral 
display 




64K 




64 keys. 4 
user-prog ram m ab I e 


RS-232C 

interface 


40 x 25 
1 6 colors 


printer 




cassette 




standard, numeric 
keypad 


IEEE-488 


80 x 25 


integral 
display 




96K/cassette 




standard, numeric 
keypad 


IEEE-488 


80 x 25 


integral 
display 




16K5V.-inch 




standard, numeric 


IEEE-488 


40 x 25 


integral 








keypad 



display 



64K cassette 



72 keys, 
12-key keypad 



40 x 24 text, 

280 x 192 graphics 



Apple- 
compatible 






4SrC5V«-inch 
floppy disk 



84 keys, 

1 2-key keypad 



3 serial, 
1 parallel 



80 x 25 



integral 
display 



1 6K/cassette 


83 keys, 


serial, 


80 x 25 text, 




1 key keypad, 


parallel 


up to 640 x 200 color 




10 special- 




graphics 




function keys 







i 


80K cassette 


96 keys 


2 parallel, 
1 serial 




terminal only, 
upgradable 


SOK'cassette 


96 keys 


2 parallel, 
1 serial 


12-inch 


green CRT, 
terminal only, 
upgradable 


80K/'disk controller only 


96 keys 


2 parallel. 
1 serial 




12 inch 
green CRT, 
terminal only, 
upgradable 


32K 8-inch 
floppy disk 




serial 






64K/dual 5%-inch 
double -density 
floppy disks 


62 keys, 

1 4-key keypad 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x 24 


9-inch integral 
green CRT 


1 28K'cassette 


72 keys 


parallel 

serial 


80 x 25. 

up to 512 X 256 

graphics 






64Kdual 5 1 /wnch 
floppy disk 


81 keys, 
10-key keypad 


serial, 
parallel 




5-inch 
integral CRT 


16K/5Vi-mch 
floppy disk 


53 keys, button -type 


serial 


32 x 16 

8 colors, 1 92 x 256 

capability 















3 

ro 
m 



eniry-level H-89 (from Heath VZ-W (from Zenith). Like the 
Radio Shack TRS-SO Made! III. this all-in-one unit houses the 
CRT, keyboard. CPU, and 48K of RAM. At SI 895 as a kit from 
Heath, it's quite a bargain. Fully assembled and tested, it is 
called the Z-89 and costs about $1,000 more. 

The computer uses two Z80 microprocessors — one for com- 
puting purposes, and the other to handle display functions. The 
second Z80 allows the first to perform its task more efficiently. 
The H/Z-89 comes with an 84-key keyboard that includes a 
1 2-key keypad. 

Also included is a single SVi-inch disk drive. The operating 
system is Heath 's own HDOS. but the computer can also ran 
CP/M, which opens the door to a wealth of software. 

Although a black-and-white CRT is standard, an anti-glare 
green (or black-and-white) one is available for an additional 
$30. The display is 80 by 24. with an optional 25th status line. 
There are also three RS-232 serial ports to allow the connection 
of a printer, modem, etc. 

Commodore 

Commodore Business Machines also has a number of com- 
puters in this price class. For instance, we find the 32K PET 
4032N. It features a built-in 12-inch. 40 character display, and 
includes a keyboard with both alphanumeric and graphics 
characters, and numeric keypad. With a single disk drive, the 
system sells for S1695; without, it sells for SI 295, 

Also in this price range is the Commodore 64 which, with a 
dot-matrix printer and a single floppy-disk drive costs SI .589. 

Another entry is the SI 500 CBM 8Q32B. which features a 
typewriter-style keyboard, numeric keypad, built-in CRT with 
an 80 column by 25-line display, and 32K of RAM. ROM-based 
BASIC 4.0 is also standard. 

Like all CBM machines, the SI 695 BI28 uses an 8-bit 
microprocessr — in this case a 6509. The Commodore "B"- 
scries computers are aimed at the business market and this one 
comes with 128K of RAM— more than enough memory for just 
about any business application. It is another of Commodore's 
all-in-one machines and. as such, includes an integral 80- 
column by 25-1 inc CRT. 

While the computer uses Commodore's own DOS . CPfM can 
be run by adding a plug-in card option. 

Osborne 

An interesting phenomenon in this segment of the 
microcomputer market is the all-in-one. truly portable unit. One 
such is the Osborne 1 . which carries a pricetage of S 1 795 . 

What sets this system apart from the others we've discussed 
so far is that there is no need to purchase cither peripherals or 
add-on software. A CRT and dual S-'A-inch floppies arc built in, 
and a comprehensive software package is included (see below ) 

If the name "Osborne" sounds familiar, it should. Adam 
Osborne is one of the wizards of the microcomputer revolution 
and not only manufacturers computers, but has also for a long 
time been a successful author and publisherof articles and books 



O 



111 



w 

6 

Q 

< 

a. 





A FULL FEATURED, trully portable computer, the Kaypro It from Non 
Linear Systems features a nine-inch display. 



THE COMMODORE "8" series of personal computers, such as the B128, 
are aimed primarily at the business market. 

on microcomputers and the microcomputer industry. Apparent- 
ly, what Osborne felt the world was ready for was a low-priced, 
full-service computer, so he developed the Osborne I. 

A CP/M-based unit the computer weighs only 23 pounds and 
is small enough to fit under an airline scat. For truly portable 
field use, it can't be beat. Not only does it have built-in dual 
5 '/4-inch, single-density floppy disks- — there is a double-density 
option available for increased mass storage — but it also comes 
with a powerful software package that includes WordStar! 
MailMerge, Supercalc, MBASIC, and CBASIC-2 . 

Each single-density floppy can hold 100K, and there is a 
5-inch high-resolution CRT. That CRT is excellent for Field 
work, but for home or office use you might be better advised to 
purchase the optional 9-inch green-phosphor monitor. The full 
8l-kcy keyboard has a 10-key keypad for quick numeric data 
entry. The Osborne also has an IEEE-488 port (popularized by 
Hewlett-Packard and used by Commodore) for interfacing with 
test equipment. 

Perhaps the most important diing about this system is its 
completeness. With it. a user really has little need of anything 
else, save, perhaps, a printer. In fact, some observers have said 
that what a buyer gets when he puts down his money is the 
software — hardware is free. 

Non Linear Systems 

The SI 795 Kaypro II is quite similar in the Osborne I. lis 
manufacturer. Non Linear Systems, is noted for its test equip- 
ment and is a newcomer to the computer field. 

The key difference between this and the Osborne unit is the 
size of the display — 9-inches is standard — and the mourning of 
the disk drives (vertically, rather than horizontally). 

Like the Osborne machine, the Kaypro II uses a Z80A mi- 
croprocessor and is CP/M-based. It has two single-sided, 
double-density S'/t-ineh disk drives, and. like the Osborne, has a 
serial port for peripherals 

Instead of using WordStar for word processing, Non Linear 
Systems has opted for Select, and also includes a spelling 
checker. StiperSpeller. MBASIC is also among the software 
supplied. 

The success of the Osborne I indicates that a market exists for 
such a system and the arrival of the Kaypro II shows that 



76 



manufacturers arc filling (he void, There arc sure to be more 
computers of this son to come. 



Upgrades 

Tins sector of the price spectrum also contains various system 
upgrades. For instance. Radio Shack's TRS-SO Model III is 
available for Sl l >95 with one S'/.-inch disk drive and 48K of 
RAM. 

Even the Explorer 85 is here, in its ncar-fully configured state 
with the addition of a floppy disk for mass storage and with 
CP/M. That system prices out at SI 530. 

System expansion continues even in the CBM lineup with the 
PET 4016N. By adding one disk drive to the 40I6N — giving 
170K of on-line storage, the price is raised to 51690. 

Adding 64K of memory to the CBM S032B raises its price to 
$1995, hut that gives a total of 96K of RAM. which is more than 




$1500-$2000 




IN ITS NEARLY FULLY CONFIGURED FORM, the Netronlcs Explorer 65 
Includes a floppy-disk drive and CP/M. 



adequate forjust about any task that can be imagined. 

And, speaking of Commodore, a new system makes its 
appearance in this category, loo. the SupcrPET SP9000, priced 
at SI 995. This is an enhanced 8032 with a second processor, an 
8-bit 6809. The SuperPET SP9000 is a very capable unii with 
96K of RAM. The languages its recognizes include Waterloo's 
microBASlC. nr micro APL. micro Pascal, and microFOR- 
TRAN; it can also be programmed in 6809 assembly language 
That gives this machine a great deal of computing power. 

System expansion continues even with the Atari 800 home 
computer. When this system is fleshed out with a cassette 
recorder, the modem-expansion unit, and a printer, the cost rives 
to SI 552. 

Even the Radio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer has an entry 
in this price category for home use. With I6K, one disk drive. 
printer, and color receiver the price is almost SI 900. R-E 



>i 



CALIFORNIA COMPUTER SYSTEMS 



$100 
ZD3Z 32K STATIC RAM AST 
2QC NSEC 

ZI16 T6K STATIC HAM AS T 



S468.00 



200 NSEC 


S279.50 


2065 64 K DYNAMIC RAM AST 


$351,00 


»00 S-100 MAIN FRAM AST 


$500.00 


2422* FLOPPY DISC WITH CP/M 22" 


S372.50 


2831* ARITHMETIC PROCESSOR A&T 


S 5 52.50 


2110* ZBO CPU AST 


S2B1.25 


Z7I0* A SERIAL 1/0 AST 


S291 95 


ZSfll* 12 SLOT MOTHER BOARD 


$150 00 


ZTZDA 4 PARALLEL AST 


S214 95 


fRDTO MAIDS WW 


539.95 


APPLE PRODUCTS 




Tit** I2K ROM/PR0M 


$99.95 


7424* CALENDAR/CLOCK, 


SI 06 95 


744D* PROGRAMMABLE TIMER 


SI 06 95 


7470A A TOD CONVERTER 


S1 05.95 


7490AGPIB(IE46fj) INTERFACE 


$1 52.00 


771DAASYNC SERIAL 


S12S95 


771ZA SYNC SERIAL . 


S148.50 


77Z0A PARALLEL STANDARD 


$1 05.00 


77201 PARALLEL CENTRONICS 


$1 05.00 


71111 ARITHMETIC PROCESSOR W/DISC 


$325.00 


7*1 1C ARITHMETIC PROCESSOR W'ROM 


$32500 


7520* EXTENDER 


$23 50 


7300* APPLE CLIP 


S8.00 


SOFTWARE 




23-01 CP/M~MACR0 ASSEMBLER ON DISK 


$76 95 


24-01 CP/M'" SYMBOLIC INSTRUCTION DEBUGGER 


S64 25 


25-01 CP/M" TEXT FORMATER 


S64 25 


26-01 CP/M'" BACKGROUND PRINT UTILITY 


S42.95 



OTHER CCS PRODUCTS ARE AVAILABLE 
CALL FOR PRICE. 



=sm 



MICROCOMPUTER PRODUCTS 



SI 00 PRODUCTS 
CBIA 6060 PROCESSOR PC8D 
KIT S15595. AST 

CR-Z 280 PROCESSOR BOARD 
KIT S19895. AST 

KBICB4 x 16 VIDEO. PCBD 

KIT S153 95. AST 

K82 64 x 16 VIDEO. PCBO 

KIT S1 75.95. AST 

V03 60 CHARACTER VIDEO 4MHZ 
KIT S345 95. AST 

UPGRADE HAMS FOR VB-3 

104 2 PARALLEL. 2 SERIAL PCBD 
KIT 5150.95 AS T 



5 36.95 
S21595 

S269 95 

$ 36.95 

5199 95 

S32 95 
$234 95 

S425 95 

S42 00 

S 36.95 
S199.95 



P8-I 2708 2716 PROGRAMMER BOARD 

KIT $140.95 AS I S1S9.95 

MB-ID 16K STATIC RAM 

KIT S299 95. A S T S339 95 

APPLE PRODUCTS 

»4S8 IEEE 486 INTERFACE S399 95 

*I0- II SERIAL/PARALLEL INTERFACE. 

A&T $1 78.00 

ASIO SERIAL I/O 

AST $115.95 

API0 PARALLEL 10 W/0 CABLES 

AST S87.95 

OTHER SSM PRODUCTS ARE AVAILABLE. 
CALL FOR PRICES. 



m 




MONDAY-FRIDAY BOO TO 12 DO I 00 TO 5 30 
THURSDAYS. BOOT09COPM 

(415) 728-9121 

P.O. BOX 955 • EL GRANADA, CA 9401 8 

PLEASE SEND FOR IC. XISTOR AND COMPUTER PARTS LIST 



OCT. SPECIAL SALE 
ON PREPAID ORDEilS 

ICHAUGE CAB OS COO Ofl PO S NOT AVAILABLE I 

MUST MENTION AD FOR SPECIAL PRICES 

Ejtjgj X8-64 ADAPTER FOR PROGRAMING Z732. Z73Z* AND 
Z764. 

KIT S 95.00 

WAHECO MEM - 4 KIT LESS RAM 195.95 



74 LS" SERIFS PRIME PARTS 



LSOO 
LS02 
LS04 
LS05 
LSOB 
LStO 
LS13 
LSI 4 
LS20 
LS26 
LS27 
LS30 
LS32 
LS37 
LS38 
LS42 
LS74 
LET 5 

Lsas 

LS86 

LSOO 
1 592 
L5S3 
LSI 22 
LSI 23 
I SI 25 
LSI 26 



EA 5 FOR 

25 1 23 

25 I 23 

2S l 23 

25 1 33 

35 1 66 

25 1 23 

JS . '.'. 

99 4 50 

25 l S3 



1 66 

1 66 
1 23 
I 66 



55 2 50 

35 I 66 

55 2 50 

15 2 14 

50 2 36 

115 5 46 

40 1 90 

60 2 65 

60 2 65 

60 2 85 

45 2 14 

95 4SO 

90 4 26 

75 3 56 



LSI 32 
LS136 
LSI 38 

LSI 39 
LSI 45 
LS147 
LSI 48 
LSI 51 
LSI S3 
LSI 55 
L5156 
LSI57 
LS15S 
LS16Q 
LS161 
LSI 62 
LSI 63 
LSI 64 
LSI 66 
LSI 73 
LSI 74 
LSI 75 
LSI 90 
LStOt 
LSI 92 
LSI S3 
LSI 96 



EA 5 FOR 
75 3 56 
50 2 38 
75 3 56 
75 3 56 

1 20 5 70 

2 49 

1 35 ■ 
75 3 56 
75 3 56 
SO 4 28 
90 4 28 
78 3 56 
75 3.56 
90 4 28 
95 4 51 
9S 4 51 
95 4 51 
95 4 51 

1 75 8 31 
80 3 80 
95 451 
95 4 51 

I. OO 4 75 

I 00 4 75 
85 4 04 
95 4 51 
85 4 04 



LSI 97 

LS221 
LS240 
LS243 
LS244 
LS245 
LS251 
LS257 
L5258 
LS260 
LS266 
LS279 
LS290 
LS293 
LS295 
.LS367 
LS366 
LS373 
LS374 
LS377 
LS37S 
LS62C 
LS626 
LS629 
LS6S2 
LS6B3 
LS688 



EA 5 FOR 
85 4 04 
115 5 46 
1 60 855 
1 75 831 

1 75 6 31 

2 15 ■ 

1 00 4 75 

85 4 04 

95 4.04 

65 • 

46 2 99 

50 2 38 

80 3 60 

60 3 80 

1 05 4.99 

70 3 33 

70 3 33 

1 85 8,79 

1 80 8 55 

1 45 6.SS 

1 IB 581 

2 25 

2 25 

1 44 

3 20 

2 30 
2 40 



QUANTITY OF 5 FOR MUST BE OF THE SAME DEVICE THEY 
MAY NOT BE MIXED AM ADDITIONAL 5^> OFF PURCHASES 

OVER S50 ON LS PARTS ON PHEPAID ORDERS BY CHECK OR 
MONEY OROEH ONLY 



VISA or MASTCHCrlARCE Send account number interbank number expiralipn dale 
and sirjn your order Approx postage *>H be adde d aiders vmti clt a or mwey order 
will be sent post paid in LIS II ycu are not a regular cuslryner. please use cftarge. 
cashier's etwek « postal money ordei Otherwise there will be i two- Keek delay tor 
checks lo clear. Calif residents add tj 5 V . tax Money bacfc id-rjay guarantee We 
cannot accept returned I Cs mat ftave been soldered to Pi ices si. eject to c r-.aige *>. I tw' 
nolice JtO ilaliin irriar. sz.OO tirntr elir|i ni iriin Jin nir. JJD PC 



CIRCLE 30 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



try out the in-stock selection of 

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A r-oroaioiflfr; 
tMyt** "'T4i ore! 






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Now available at your nearby Heath kit 
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You get more with a Heath /Zenith per- 
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our microcomputers are proving themselves daily, in the field. 

2. Vast software library: Three operating systems 
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3. Self-instruction courses: Evaluation and program- 
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4. Service support: Before and after the sale - 
consultation by phone, carry-in service. 

Test run one of our microcomputers 
at any of the more than 60 convenient 
Heathkit Electronic Centers in the U.S. 



Heathkit 

ELECTRONIC CENTERS 

See the white pages of your telephone book tfff 
for store I oc ati on s and te I epho n e n u m be rs . I- 




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Or if you prefer, send to the address below for a 

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Please send my tree catalog, describing your complete line 
of microcomputer products! 



Name . 



Address. 



City. 



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CP-214 



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hiRrti p 1SON frff iNFonwaTiriN cardI 



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Welcome to someday 

Someday is today with the CompuServe Information Serv.ce CompuServe is available through a 
local phone call in most major U.S. cities It connects almost any brand or type of personal computer 
or terminal with our big mainframe computers and data bases All you need to get started is on 
inexpensive telephone coupler and easy-to-use software. 

CompuServe's basic service costs only $5 00 per hour, billed in minute increments to your 
charge card 

The CompuServe Information Service is available at many computer stores across the country. 
Check with your favorite computer center or contact CompuServe. 



Welcome to someday 



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Columbus, Ohio 43220 (614) 457-8650 



000to$2500 



$2000-$2500 



You'll find both basic 
systems and powerful 
upgrades of lower-priced 
systems in this price range. 
Here's a look at what's 
available. 



MARC STERN 



THE PRICE RANGE BETWEEN S200Q ANI> J2500 IS POPU1 VII-,1) m 

relatively few personal computers. And. most of those in this 
spectrum are really upgrades of existing systems. As noted 
earlier, it seems as if there arc few computers in the middle price 
ranges. Instead, home computers tend to populate the low and 
high ends of the pricing spectrum. 

So, what will a potential buyer find in this price range? The 
buyer will find that the upgrades of the various systems will 
consist of increased RAM memory and increased mass storage 
via the addition of disk drives. Of course, there are some new 
systems that make their first appearance in this range. 

Intertec 

The first new system to appear in this range is Intertec Data 
System's Superhruin Jr. It is another of the all-in-one types of 
home computers, including not only the keyboard, but also the 
CRT and disk drives in one terminal-like housing. 

This computer system is driven by dual Z80 CPU's with a fast 
clock rate of 4 MHz. This speed gives this system the ability to 
access, digest and, return data quickly. The operating system is 
the industry-standard CP/M 2.2 and the system language is 
BASIC, 

In this dual -processor-type of system, one Z80 performs data 
processing while the other performs * "housekeeping" chores 
such as display functions. Since the first ZHO is relieved of the 
housekeeping chores, the actual data processing is much faster. 

The keyboard includes an 18-key keypad for numeric data 
entry. Since this is an all-in-one machine, it also includes a 
12-inch CRT that is capable of the standard 80 x 24 display. 
This green phospher CRT has a 20-MHz bandwidth. The Super- 
brain Jr. is capable of interfacing with peripheral equipment via 
a pair of serial ports, 

MicroSource 

Another personal computer that makes its appearance in this 
price category is the MicroSource M6000P. an entirely modular 
unit. 

Driven by an eight-bit Z80, the M6000P is another of the truly 
portable all-in-one computers appearing on the market. Like 
both the Osborne I and the Kaypro It. this portable runs the 
CP/M operating system. This is one of the later versions of 



CP.'M, version 2.2. 

When fully configured, this system consists of dual S'/i-inch 
drives, a built-in nine-inch CRT display, and a full 83-key 
keyboard thai includes not only a 10-key numeric keypad for 
rapid data entry, but also features four user-definable keys and 
12 special function keys. 

Of course, the fully configured system is much more ex- 
pensive than the model that fits into this area of the price 
spectrum. The model that is described here does not include the 
floppy disk drives and is priced at 52 1 95. What sets it apart from 
both the Osborne I and the Kaypro It is the fact thai both 
lower-priced systems come equipped with powerful software 
packages, along with the operating system, while MicroSource 
lists only the operating system. 

Apple 

Some of the other systems in this section are upgrades ol 
basic systems. For example, in this verison. the Apple II Pitts 
has had its capabilities extended in both RAM. mass storage, 
and its CRT. The $2495 price tag adds 32K of RAM— needed so 
the DOS 3.2 will run. This extra RAM also supports a far more 
powerful range of applications. In this configuration, the user 
can run such higher-level languages as Pascal. FORTRAN and 
Pilot. 

For mass storage, no longer does a user have to rely on a 
cassette tape recorder. Instead, he gains a single double-density 
5'/»-inch floppy disk for data storage, quite a step forward in 
system speed and data access. In this configuration, ton, the user 
gains a 12-inch green CRT display. 

As you can see. this is a far cry from the basic keyboard 
computer and its cassette-type mass storage. 

Radio Shack 

The same is true of Radio Shack's TRS-XO Model III. In its 
S2495 configuration, the user gains access to dual 5'/i-inch 
floppy disk drives for much greater data storage. The double- 
density drives allow for storing as much as 360K of data, quite 
an improvement over a cassetle-based system. 

In this version, too. the user gains 32K of built-in RAM 
memory. Now 48K, this expansion allows the user to interface 
nol only the disk operating system TRSDOS, but also the 










processing and information-handling chores. And. as you can 
sec. the system has started to become much more powerful, as 
have the others so far described. 

At this level, too, the PC-S001 buyer will gain access to such 
high-level languages as COBOL, FORTRAN. Pascal and BAS- 
IC. In this 32K configuration, this personal computer is able to 
handle far more complex tasks, much more quickly than the less 
expensive version. 

Sony 

Sony's SMC-70 is another example of a system that has 
gained a great deal of power with the addition of relatively little 
money. 

What does the buyer gain for his $21257 The answer to this 
one is more RAM and greater mass storage. However, it's mass 



THE MICRO SOURCE M6000P Is a portable computer that can be con- 
figured (or almost any application. 

higher-power disk BASlt 

With this system, a user can handle such tasks as word 
processing and some business information handling. All that is 
missing from this picture to make this a fully configured system 
is a printer and perhaps a communication interface such as a 
modem. The capabilin for communications is built in through 
the RS-232C serial 1/6 port 

NEC 

For S2375 . a PC-SOW "buyer gains much more capability. The 
extra money brings 32K of RAM. enough to handle the CP/M 
operating system, and 2S0K of mass storage. It also brings a 
12-tneh green monitor with a standard SO x 25-line display 
formal. 

With this type of system a user should be able to handle word 




THE APPLE It PLUS from Apple Is shown here with Us accessory Monitor 
til and two dish drives. 



m 



TABLE 5— S2000-S2500 
Manufacturer 


Model 


Price 


CPU 


Word 
Length 


Disk 

Operating 

System(s) 


Language(s) 




Apple Computer 
20525 Mariani Ave. 
Cupertino. CA 95014 


Apple II 


S2495 


6502 


8 bits 


DOS 3.2 


BASIC. Pilot 
Pascal, FORTRAN 




j Commodore Business 

Machines 
1 487 Devon Pk. Rd, 

Wayne. PA 19087 


CBM 
8032B 


S2190 


6502 


3 bits 


proprietary 


BASIC 




Hewlett-Packard 
1000 N.E. Circle Dr. 
Corvallis. OR 97330 


HP-85 


S2495 


Z80 


8 bits 


proprietary 


BASIC 




Imsai Comp, Div.. 
Fischer-Freitas Corp. 
•1910 81st Ave. 

Oakiand, CA 94621 


Imsai 
PCS-42 


$2490 


3085 


8 bits 


IMDOS, CP 


CBASIC, other 
CPM compatible 




Intertec Data 
Systems 

2300 Broad River Road 
Columbuia, SC 29210 


Suporbrain 
Jr. 


S2494 


Z80 


8 bits 


CPM 


BASIC, other 
CPM compatible 




MA COM OSI 
J 7 Oak Pk. 

I Bedford. MA 01730 


OSI- 
C4P-MF-24K 


$2050 


Z80 


8 bits 


OS-65D 


BASIC 




Micro Source M6000P 
595 N. Clayton Rd, 
New Lebanon, OH 45345 


S2195 


Z80 


8 bits 


proprietary 


BASIC 




NEC Home Elec. 
1 1401 W. Estes Ave. 

Oak Grove, IL 60007 


NEC 
PC8001 


S2379 


uPD 780 C-1 
(Z80-like) 


8 bits 


proprietary 


BASIC 





CO 

o 

H 
O 
or. 
i- 
o 

LU 



Q 
< 
(L. 

82 



Radio Shack 

One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth. TX 76102 



TRS-80 
Model III 



£2495 



Z80 



8 bits TRSDOS, NEWDOS. BASiC, other CP'M- 

CP M compatible 



Radio Shack 


TRS-80 S2500 
Color Computer 


6809 


8 bits 




BASIC 


Sony 

7 Mercedes Dr. 
Montvale. NJ 


SCM-70 S2125 


Z80A 


8 bils 


CPM 


BASIC, 
Pascal, other 
CP M compatible 


Texas Instruments 
PO Box 22501 


TI-99'4A $2324 


TMS9900 


16 
bits 


proprietary 


BASIC, 
editorassembler 



storage with a twist, as we sti;il! sec 

In this configuration, the Sony SMC-70 has 32K of built-in 
RAM. This should be more than enough to handle any system- 
related tasks and it gives the user access to the higher-level 
Pascal programming language. The user already has access to 
BASIC. In this configuration, too. the user gains 2K0K of mass 
storage on a single double-sided, double-density micro — yes. 
that's micro— floppy disk drive 

Rather than relying on the industry standard 5'/4-inch disk, 
Sony has opted for its own 3'/i-inch micro disks. In truth, they 
have as much mass storage capability as larger disks, but a user 
is locked into the Sony system for his disks, which can be 
somewhat of a drawback. On the plus side, though, if this 
system becomes widely accepted in the personal computer mar- 
ket, then it is likely there will soon be micro disks from man\ 
aftermarkei sources In fact, with the amount of space they save, 
it is possible the rest of the industry could move in this direction. 
But, who knows what the future will bring? 

MA COM OSI 

Even M/A COM OSI's system continues building in this 
building block manner. Its C4P-MF-24K system builds on the 
C4P computer and adds some very functional feature 
starters, there's more built-in RAM, with 24K. This should give 
the user enough RAM to support the OS-65D operating system 
This system includes color video output, AC control interfaces; 
D/A converter, and music output. 

At this level, the buyer will also gain a 5 /j- inch minifloppy 
disk, which provides greater mass storage. It will also speed 
system time because of quicker data access. This system also 
includes a security interface and a 16-line I/O port. 

Imsal 

Imsai also has an entry in this price category, and. to be 
honest, for the person looking for a good micro-mainframe 




$2000-$2500 



computer, any of the Imsai products is a good choice: in this 
price segment, there's Imsai's PC-42. It handles system expan- 
sion to the tune of 10 slots on the motherboard, and. in the 
correct configuration, it should be able to handle multiusers, 

This computer is driven by an 8085 CPU with a clock speed of 
3 MHz. It also features dual S'A-inch minifloppies that have 
multi-format recognition capabilities. AZSOboard is also listed 
among the option for this microcomputer. 

The beauty of this system is its ability to address different 
floppy disk densities. This should give the user the ability to 
install higher-density disks. It features both serial and parallel 
ports for interfacing. 

Interestingly, this is a dual operating system machine. It will 
recognize the company's proprietary IMDOS operating system 
or the industry standard CPM TheBASIC it uses is CBAS1C. 
which is a compiler version and allows for flexibility in string or 



Memory'Storage 



Memory'Sto 
llopp. 

" 32K7 
floppy disk 



Expansion 



Keyboard 



I/O 



Display 



Comments 



12-incb 



standard 



40 x24 



standard, 
numeric keypad 



IEEE-488 80 x 25 



12-inch 

integral 
display 



64Kcarlridge 



94 keys. 14 IEEE-488 32 x 16 text, 

programmable 1 92 ■ 256 graphics 



integral 5-meh 
display & 
jsnnter 



32Kdual 5vi-inch 
floppy disks 



64K/5'/i-inch i 
density floppy 

24K'5Vvinch 
floppy disk 



NA 



serial N A 

parallel N A 



micro- 
mainframe 



64K/5'/4-inch double 
density floppy disk 



80 keys, 1 8-key 
keypad 



serial 



80 ■ 25 



12-ineh 
green integral 
display 



64K 



standard 



serial. 
16-10 
lines 



standard 



80 ■ 24 



co lor- video 
output 



32Kdual 5Y*- 
f loppy disks 


inch 


84 keys 


serial 
parallel 


80 •- 25 


t2-incti 

green CRT 


48Kdual 5'.V 
Iloppy disks 


inch 


65 keys. 
12-key keypad 


parallel 
serial 


64(32) x 16 


integral 
1 2-inch 
display 


32K 5'A-inch 
floppy disks 




53 button- type 
keys 


serial 


8 colors, 
192 - 256 


printer 


32K3v,-jnch 
micro- 
floppy disks 




72 keys. 5 
programmable 


serial 
parallel 


80 x 24 text, 

up to 640 • 400 graphics 


40K cassette 




standard 


serial 


32 * 24 text, 

192 x 256 graphics 


printer, 

10-inch color monitor 



o 

H 

o 

co 

m 
u 

<3 

03 



83 



-V- 



i 




uw ^ynn 



A POWERFUL COMPUTER IN ITS BASIC FORM, the power of an HP-85 
from Hewlett-Packard can be Increased with the addition of a printer and 
plotter. 

file-handling. Since il is also a compiler language, if also lends 
to have a faster run time. 

At $2490^ tins system packs a lot of potential and it makes 
sense for the potential buyer looking for a micromainframe-type 
computer with its associated versatility in configuration and 
expansion. Since this system is contained in a system box, the 
user has the flexibility of obtaining his own peripherals. 



Commodore Business Machines 

With the addition of a sinyk- ruiniflnpp\ disk drive to CBM's 
all-in-one 80S2B, the price of this system rises to $2190. This 
gives the user of this system access to more mass storage — 
170K. The minifloppy disk drive also increases the system 
speed beacause of taster data access 

Texas Instruments 

Texas Instruments is another computer manufacturer whose 
upgraded personal computer falls into this category At S2.*24. a 
user can have a pretty complete system, with the exception of 
disk drives. Mass storage is still cassette-based, and the system 
still has only 16K of RAM. but a printer and 10-inch color 
monitor has been added 

Radio Shack 

Even the Radio Shack TRSSO Color Coinpiiu 
a complete, powerful system in this price category. For $2500, 
its RAM memory is increased to 32K and this provides the user 
with access to the much more powerful Extended Color BASIC 
language, with its powerful data-handling capabilities. 

This system also has more than 300K of mass storage on dual, 
single-sided, double-density 5'/>-inch minifloppy disk drives. It 
also includes a doi matrix line printer. Thus, it is a full-featured 
system with considerable graphics power. 

Hewlett-Packard 

The 52495 HP-85 is a powerful computer system rigln out of 
the box. A slim-line, all-in-one computer, it combines powerful 
graphics capability with expandability into a trim package. 

Like many other personal computers on the market, the HP- 
H5 uses a Z80 processor. It features a built-in CRT. 

The 94-key keyboard ol this portable personal computer 
contains a numeric keypad for rapid data entry and contains a 
built-in thermal printer for hard-copy output. R-E 



tn 
a 

2 

o 

rr 

i- 
o 



o 
a 
< 

rr 

84 




1. CONTRAST 

i. POWER-BRIGHT 

3. V-HOCD 

4. H-HOLD 



VIDEO ioo 

12''Black&White 
MONITOR 

$3950 

byAMDEK 



Fourth Dimension Systems 

FLOPPY DISK DRIVE 
FOR APPLE3 COMR 

The unit features a track 
zero micro-switch and 
read/write electronics 
DOS 3.2.1. , DOS 3.3, 
PASCAL or CP/M. 

' 34995 

SK.ETTE 

5^"BULK"OEM"PACK 
FOR YOUR .— 

APPLE $14-9 

Box of 100 ^ ,M ^ 



BROAD BAND MICROWAVE 

RECEIVER SYSTEM 

1.8GHZto2.4 GHZ 

only 
$295.00 



RANGE 
SCOPE: 



Line of sight to 250 miles. 



Will receive within the frequency band from sateliles. primary 
microwave stalions. and repeater microwave booste 
stations. 
CONTENTS: Packaged in 19"x19">:4 1/2" corrugated carton complete 
with: 

• 24" Disn • 300 Ohm to 75 Ohm Adapter 

• Feed-Horn Receiver • 750 Ohm to 300 Ohm Adapter 

• Mounting Bracket • 60 Feet Coax Cable with Connectors 

• Mounting Clamp • 3 Feel Coax Cable with Connectors 

• Instructions 



16 K RAM EXPANSION CARD 

For Your APPLE® 
LANGUAGE TRANSPARENT 

ALL NINE RAMS INSTALLED! 

$7995 




VISA 



u2 Saoj 



VISION-80 @ 80x24 Video 

Display Card $269 

Vista Computer Company's new VisiotvSO board isa 
sophisticated yet easy to use video display card for 
the Apple 1 " computer. 



TERMS OF SALE: Cash, checks, credit cards, C.O.D, Calif, residents add 6% sales tax. 

"HAVE YOU KISSED YOUR COMPUTER LATELY" 

Components Express, Inc. 



380 E. Edinger • Santa Ana, Calif. 92705 • 714/558-3972 TWX 910-595-1 565 






CIRCLE 28 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



$2500to$3000 





$2500-$3000 



A 16/8-bit system and a fully 
configured handheld 
computer are just some of 
the things that you'll find in 
this price range. 

MARC STERN 



IN THE PERSONAL COMPUTER MARKETPLACE, I HI Rl-S AN IN- 

teresting phenomenon taking place. Slowly, but surely. 1 6-bit 
CPU's arc beginning to make their presence felt in more and 
more systems. It's not that the eight-bit CPU is going to become 
obsolete overnight, it's just that 1 6-bit machines oiler more 
powerful system architecture and faster system operating time. 

Eight-bit machines will likely be around for many years to 
come because they offer a wide range of capability. However, 
the 1 6-bit machines offer far more flexibility and power and they 
are likely to become the dominant machines of the future. 

We've already seen how there are now 16-bit CPU's already 
being used in the lower price -range personal computers. Both 
IBM and Olivetti use 1 6-bit CPU's and other systems make use 
of them as peripheral processors {MTU- 1 30, but we'll get to 
that). And. in the S2500 to 53000 price range, the 1 6-bit compu- 
ter from Commodore Business Machines makes its appearance. 

Commodore Business Machines 

The BX256 from CBM is part of their enhanced "B" series 
personal computer line. In reality, this computer is aimed at the 
business segment of the microcomputer market. 

Like another entry in the personal computer market from 
Digital Equipment Corp. (we'll get to it a little later in our 
survey) , the BX256 is a dual -process or personal computer. This 
might lead one to believe that it contains a pair of Z80A 's 01 
8080's. but this isn't the case. Instead, it contains a 16-bit K0K8 
and an eight-bit 6509. 

Although Commodore provides very little information about 
how the computer functions internally, we would assume that 
the dual-processors function something like this: When one 
processor is tied up, the other processor will handle system 
"'house keeping" functions, keyboard I/O and display func- 
tions. Conversely, when the second CPU is processing, the first 
must act in a like manner. 



Thus, the user gains the full speed and power of both CPU's 
independently- For instance, this system will recognize CP'M- 
86, the 16-bit version ol the standard CP/M. It will also run the 
standard 8-bit version of CP/M. The software activates ihe 
correct CPU. 

Thus. 16-bit software will run on the 16-bit processor, while 
theeighi-bit processor handles the "house keeping" chores, and 
8-bit software will run on the eight-bit CPU while the 16-bit 
CPU handles the chores. 

Rather than having to work through a master eight-bit CPU, 
which addresses a peripheral 1 6-bit processor, the programming 
accesses either one directly and the user gains all the power and 
speed built into the system. It's a good feature for the buyer 
interested in upgrading to 16-bit power while retaining the 
investment in eight-bit software. 

The BX256 is a potent system in its own right. It comes with 
256K of standard RAM. which is quite a bit of memory in a 
$2995 machine. This means this system has more than enough 
internal memory to handle whatever tasks a user or system may 
ask of it. It will easily work with either the standard version of 
CP/M or CP/M-86. 

Like other all-in-one CBM personal computers, this one 
comes with a standard 12-inch green phosphor CRT with an 
80-column x 25-line display. It also features dual built-in quad 
density (double-sided, double-density) 514-inch minifloppy 
disk drives, t 

The 94-key keyboard can he detached from the system unit 
and can be lap-held, a convenience that allows the user to find 
the most comfortable work position. This keyboard includes a 
separate keypad for numeric data entry and it has 10 user- 
programmabie keys, another good feature. Interestingly, this 
keyboard also has a double-zero key and while CBM doesn't 
explain its function clearly, it is likey this key has to do with the 
display's memory and graphics capability. 



O 
O 

m 
n 

CD 

CO 
N> 



TABLE 6— S2500-S3000 
Manufacturer Model 



Price 



CPU 



Word 
Length 



Disk 

Operating 

System(s) 



Lanq,uaq,e(s) 




Atari Home 

Computers 

1265 Borregas Ave. 

Sunnyvale, CA 94086 



Atari 

800 



S2685 



6502B 



8 bits 



proprietary 



BASIC 



Billings 
Computer Corp. 
18600 East 37th 
Independence, 
MO 64057 



Billings 
100 



$2995 



Z80 



B Oils 



propnetary 



BASIC 



Commodore Business 

Machines 

487 Devon Park Dr. 

Wayne, PA 1 90S7 



CBM 
4032 



$2590 



6502 



S bits 



proprietary 



BASIC 



Commodore Business BX256 
Machines 



S2995 



8088-6509 



8 16 
bits 



proprietary, 
CP/M 



BASIC. Pascal, 
other CP/M 
compatible 



Commodore Business CBM 

lines 8032B 

Heath Co. 

Benton Harbor, 
Ml 49022 



S2690 



6502 



8 bils proprietary 



H11A 



S2595 



KD-11HA 



16 



HT-DOS 



BASIC 



FORTRAN, BASIC 



BASIC, FORTRAN, 
UCSD p-Paseal, 
other CP/M compatible 



■ 



Heath Co. 



H-89 



S2520 
(kit} 



Z80 



8 
bits 



HDOS. 

CP M (optional) 



Heath Co. 



H-89 



$2790 

(kit) 



280 



8 

bits 



HDOS, 

CP'M (optional) 



BASIC. FORTRAN, 
UCSD p-Pascal. 
other CP-M compatible 



Hewlett Packard 
1820 Embarcadero Rd. 
Palo Alio, CA 94303 



HP-87 



$2750 



Z80 



8 bits 



proprietary, 

CPM 




IBM Information 
Systems 

: Baco Raton, FL 33432 



PC 



S2665 



8088 



16 
bits 



PCDOS, 
(optional) 



BASIC, 

UCSD Pascal IV, 

COBOL 



■ 

- 



Imsai Corp., Div., 
Fischer- 
Freitas Corp. 
Oakland. CA 94521 



PCS-42 



S2640 



8085 



8 bits 



IMDOS, 
CPM 



CBASIC. 
other CP M 
compatible 



Intertec Data 
Systems 

12300 Broad River Rd. 
Columbia. SC 29210 



Superbrain 
QD 



$2995 



Z80 



8 bits 



CP'M 



BASIC, other 

CP/M compatible 



Micro Technology MTU 

Box 12106 130-10 

Raleigh, NC 27605 



S2999 



6502 



8 bils 



CODOS 



BASIC, UCSD 
Pascal 



NEC Home Elec. 
, 1401 W. Estes Ave. 
Oak Grove. IL 60007 



PC8001 



S2849 



UPD780 c-1 
(Z80-like) 



8 bits 



propnetary 



Olivetti 

155 White Plains Rd. 
Tarrytown. NY 10591 



BASIC 



M-20 



$2965 



Z8001 



16 

bits 



PCOS 



BASIC 



Panasonic 

1 Panasonic Way 

Secaucus. NJ 07094 



RL-1000 



S2879 



8 Pits 



NA 



BASIC 



Panasonic 



RL-14O0 



S2979 



8 bils 



NA 



BASIC 



Radio Shack TRS-80 

One Tandy Center Model III 

Fort Worth. TX 76102 



$2557 



Z80 



8 hits 



TRSDOS 



to 
g 

z 
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ir 
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86 



Texas Instruments 

PO Box 225012 
Dallas. TX 75265 



TI-99 4A 



$2824 TMS9900 



16 

bits 



proprietary 



COBOL, 

BASIC. FORTRAN 



Radio Shack 


TRS-80 
Model III 


$2932 


Z80 


8 bits 


TRSDOS 


BASIC. COBOL. 
FORTRAN 


Sony 

7 Mercedes Dr. 

Montvale, NJ 07645 


SMC-70 


S2950 


Z80A 


8 bits 


CPM 


BASIC, Pascal, 
Other CP-M 

compatible 


Sony 


SMC-70 


"s'Ssoo 


Z80A 


8 bits 


CPM 


BASIC, Pascal, 



other CPM 
compatible 



BASIC, 
editor.'assembler 



Zenith Data Systems 
1000 Milwaukee Ave. 
Glenview. IL 60025 


Z-89 


S2895 


Z80 


8 
bits 


HDOS, 

CP-M (optional) 


BASIC, FORTRAN, 
UCSD p-Pascal, 
other CP'M compatible 


Zenith 


Z-90 


$2895 


Z80 


8 
bits 


HDOS, 
CP/M 


BASIC, FORTRAN. 

UCSD p-Pascal. 
other CP M compatible 













O 
00 


Memory Storage Expansion Keyboard 


I/O 


Display 


Comments 


16K#ual 

flo; 


61 keys. 
4 special 
function 


serial, 
parallel 


40 x 24 text 

320 * 1 92 graphics 


printer, 
color output 
to TV set 


64K/dual 5 1 A-lnch 
floppy disks 


94 keys, 
16 special- 
function 


80 x 24 






32K 


standard 


IEEE-488 


40 ■ 24 




128K.'dual5'/.-inch 
floppy disks 


94 keys, 10 
programmable 


IEEE-488. 

serial 


80 x 25 




« 


standard, 
numeric keypad 


IEEE-488 


80 x 24 




64K/dua1 8-inch 
floppy disks 




serial 






48k'dual 5%-tnch 
floppy disks 


84 keys, 

12 special-function 


serial 


80 x 24 text, 
33 graphics 
characters 


integral 
monitor 


Wdual S'/wnch 
floppy disks 


84 keys. 

12 special -function 


serial 


80 x 24 text, 
33 graphics 
characters 


integral 
monitor 


64Kduai 5VS-lnch 
floppy disks 


standard 


serial, 


80 x 24 text 

544 x 240 graphics 




64K 5' ^-inch 
floppy disk 


83 keys, 
10-key keypad, 
10 special- 
function keys 


serial. 
parallel 


80 x 24 


1 1 Vj-inch 

green 

CRT 


G-wdual 5 '/4-inch 
Itoppy disks 


N A 


serial, 
parallel 


N/A 


micro- 
mainframe 


64K/dual 5 : M-inch 
floppy disks 


80 keys, 
18-key keypad 


serial 


80 x 25 


12-inch 
B&W monitor 


80K' 


96 keys, 

8 programmable 


serial, 
parallel 


80 X 24 text, 

480 x 256 graphics 


Light pen 


64K/dual 5Vi-lnch 
floppy disks 


84 keys 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x 25 text 


12-inch 
B&W 

monitor 


inch 
floppy disk 


72 keys 


serial, 

parallel 


80 x 25 text, 

512 x 256 graphics 


12-inch 

B&W 

monitor 


36Kcassette 


65 keys 


»eri 


video pa;-: 


modem 
system case 


36K/cassette 


65 keys 




] package 


modem, 
I'O adapior, 
am case 


1 6 K cassette 


65 keys, 

1 2- key keypad 


serial. 
paralle 


64 (32) x 1 6 text. 
64 graphics 
characters 


graphics plotter 


K£2 


65 keys, 

1 2-key keypad 


serial, 
parallel 


64 (32) x 16 text, 
64 graphics 
characters 




••■■:• 
micro- floppy disk 


72 keys. 5 
programmable 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x 24 text. 

640 x 230 graphics 






72 keys, 5 
programmable 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x 24 text, 

640 x 230 graphics 




48K5' i-mcr 
floppy disk 


standard 


serial 


32 x 24 text, 

192 x 256 graphics 


graphics option 


4BW5V4-inch 

floppy disks 


84 keys, 

12 special-function 


serial 


84 x 24 text, 
33 graphics 


Integral 
monitor 




characters 




m 

30 

CD 
CO 

w 
87 


64& , 5%-inch 
floppy disks 


84 keys, 

1 2 special -function 


serial 


80 x 24 text, 
33 graphics 
characters 


integral 
monitor 

























w 
o 

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ADDING A DISK DRIVE lo the Intartec Superbrain 00 greatly increases Its 
storage capability. 

While this machine is aimed at the serious business user, ii 
still retains sound synthesis capabilities. It is capable of three- 
part harmony over nine octaves, something you won't find in 
many business computers. 

On the whole, this is a powerful machine in its own right, but 
its capabilities can be further expanded with the addition of a 
hard disk and printer. However, this raises the system's price 
considerably. 

There are other CBM entries in this price class, too. For 
instance, by adding dual floppy-disk drives to the PET4032N 
and increasing the mass storage capacity to a total of 340K on 
single-sided double-density disks, the cost of this system rises to 
S2590. And. by adding 64K of RAM memory to the CBM 
8032B. along with a single disk drive with its 170K of mass 
storage, then the price will rise to S2.690. 

Panasonic 

Believe it of not, even a fully-configured handheld system's 
price can reach this region. Look at the Panasonic HIOOO and 
H1400. When this system is fully configured with a video 
interface. 36K of RAM (which must be daisy-chained), an I/O 
adapter for peripherals and an attache case into which this 
system fits, the price rises to S2979 for the HI400 and $2879 for 
the HIOOO. 

Fully equipped the whole system is known as The Link and it 
makes a handheld microcomputer into a full-featured portable 
terminal. The features and peripherals added should make this 
s\stem very attractive for the business traveler, especially one 
who must communicate with a mainframe or electronic mail 
system. *& 

NEC 

In this price range, w-e also find many systems beginning to 
take on a great deal of computing power. For example, the 
S2849 NEC PC-SOOl now has 64K of RAM and it gains its true 
potential as a system. In this configuration, this system ean run 
CP/M, as well" as the high-level Pascal language. The other 
languages that can also run on this machine include FORTRAN, 
as well as COBOL, NBASIC (also the system language! and 
CBASIC, the faster compiled BASIC. 

In this configuration, the system has also gained dual 5'Xi-inch 
minifloppy disk drives that provide up to 280K of mass storage. 
Its potcniial for further expansion is increased with the addition 
of an expansion interface box that offers card slots and the 
potential to increase the system's RAM to 128K. This is a 
modular system and in this configuration, NEC's 12-inch green 
phospher monitor has been added. It features the industry- 
standard 80 x 25 display. In reality, in most systems the 25th 
line of the display is reserved for status use, so it is really a 
24-line display for text. Please referto the previous discussion of 
the basic system. 



Intertec 

Another system upgraded is available from Intertec Data 
Systems. It is the S2995 Superbrain QD and it is a step up from 
the Superbrain Jr. The essential difference in this all-in-one 
computer is the amount of mass storage. Where the Superbrain 
Jr. offers mass storage of 350K on one quad-density minifloppy 
disk drive, the Superbrain QD offers 750K, This additional 
mass storage greatly increases the capability of this dual- 
processor system. 

Unlike a I6-bit/8-bit dual processor unit, this one uses dual 
eight-bit Z80's with a high clock speed of 4 MHz. This allows 
for much more rapid data access and use. Since ii is a dual- 
processor system, the speed is enhanced because one processor 
handles the data processing, while the other handles the "house- 
keeping." 

The standard operating system of this and other Intertec 
offerings is CP/M 2.2. It also comes equipped with 12-ineh 
green CRT and keyboard. 

Heath/Zenith 

Another dual eight-bit microprocessor system is the H89 from 
Heath. This is one of the few computers that are available in kit 
form. This is also sold fully -assembled as the 2S9 by Zenith. 
Please refer to the previous discussion for a lull description of 
this system. 

The H89, in this configuration, has been upgraded by the 
addition of dual S'/s-inch floppy disk drives with a mass storage 
capacity of 200K. This S2525 all-in-one computer in kil form 
comes with a standard 84-key keyboard and 12-tnch black and 
white CRT. The computer is driven by a pair of Z80's with a 
clock speed of 2.048 MHz. Its 48K of RAM is enough to work 
with its HDOS operating system and CP/M. A user is also 
capable of using BASIC. FORTRAN and UCSD-p- Pascal pro- 
gramming languages. 

This isn't the only Heath/Zenith entry in this price category. 
An upgrade HS9 kit is available. In this $2790 configuration the 
standard amount of RAM is increased to 64K. 




The HS9 FROM HEATH Is one of the few computers available In kit form. It 
Is also available fully assembled as the 289 from Zenith. 

IBM 

IBM's Personal Computer also gams a great deal of power in 
this price range. The basic system was described previously, so 
here we will concentrate on what has been added. 

Specifically, this system gains about 32QK of mass storage 
through the addition of one double-sided, double-density disk 
drive. Its RAM has also been increased from 16K to 64K, which 
allow s t!ii» svsiem to work with the high level BASIC compiler, 
UCSD-p-Pascal and COBOL. Its price is now 82665. 

The other addition to this system has been the 1 1 '/-inch green 
CRT that has the standard 80 < 25 display. 



in 






Sony 

Sony's SMC-70 upgrades twice in this price range. In its first 
upgrade, which increases the price to S2500, the amount of 
RAM has grown to 64K, while one 3 '/2-inch microfloppy disk 
drive has been added. This gives this system 280K of mass 
storage. Another enhancement to this system is the addition of a 
1 2-inch green CRT. Please refer to the previous discussion for a 
full description of the basic system. 

The second SMC-70 upgrade consists of adding a second 
microfloppy drive for a total of 560K of mass storage. This gives 
this system far more power and makes it a better buy for the 
$2950 price tag. 

Olivetti 

Still a further system upgrade in this price category comes 
from Olivetti, whose $2965 M-20 gains 320K of mass storage 
with the addition of one double-sided doubie-density disk drive. 
Also added to this system is the standard black-and-white CRT. 

This system, thanks to its 16-bit processor, has quite a bit 
going for it and, as you can see, its potential power is now 
capable of being used. 

Micro Technology 

The same can be said for Micro Technology's MTU-I30. In 
its $2999 configuration, this system gains t megabyte of mass 
storage through the addition of one quad-density eight-inch 
floppy disk drive. When this is combined with the system's 
standard 80K of RAM, one can see the power built into this 
system. 

Atari 

Even some of the lower-priced home computers have system 
upgrades that bring their price into this category. For instance, 
when you add two disk drives for mass storage to the Atari 800 
system, plus a dot matrix printer, the system's price easily rises 
to S2685. It is also quite a powerful system in this advanced 
version. 

The Atari 400 system can also be configured into a level that 
brings its prices into this spectrum. When this system is 
equipped with dual, S'/i-ineh minifloppy disks, modem and 
communications software, and a printer, the system cost rises to 
S2572. 

Radio Shack 

Radio Shack also has an entry in this category. It is an 
expansion of its 16K TRS-80 Model III. but it still relies upon a 
cassette recorder for mass storage. The additions to this 
system — -aimed at engineers — consist of a graphics plotter and a 
printer and its price increases to $2557. 

Another expansion of the TRS-80 Model HI results in what 
Radio Shack calls their "Complete World Processing System," 
This time, the RAM memory is increased to 48K and the 
expansion includes a a dot-matrix tine printer, a disk drive and 
word processing program. At S2932 it is quite a package. 

Texas Instruments 

The same is true of the Texas Instruments TI-99/4A. When 
you expand its RAM to 32K and add a drive, video controller 
and a 1 0-inch monitor (a pretty complete system for both home 
and business use), then you find the price rising to $2824. 

Billings 

Here's a newcomer to this price range. Although the Billings 
Computer Co. has been selling computers to businesses for the 
last five years, this is their first entry into the lower-priced 
microcomputer market. 

Although this company makes several microcomputer-based 
systems, their 100 Series, priced at S2995, is their entry-level 
machine. 

Based on an eight-bit Z80 CPU. this system features a high- 
contrast green CRT screen and a detachable keyboard with 16 




$2500-$3000 



function keys, a numeric keypad and eight cursor control keys. 
It also sports a standard typewriter keyboard for a total of 94 
keys. 

Mass storage is via dual, single-sided, single-density 5 '/t-inch 
minifloppy disk drives which provides about 100K of storage for 
a user. 

Imsai 

Micromainframe-type systems still abound in the 
microcomputer world and in this price range we find two, one 
from Imsai. the second from Heath. 

Imsai 's PCS -42 micromainframe- type of computer benefits 
from the addition of 32K of RAM in this S2640 configuration. 
This gives this system the potential of taking full advantage of 
either the IMDOS operating system or CP/M 2.2. Mass storage 
is provided by dual 5'/t-inch single density disks. With these 
drives, 100K of mass storage is provided. 

Heath 

A very powerful system is the Heath H-l I A kit. It is powered 
by a custom-made KD-11HA CPU. Equivalent to a 16-bit 
system, it is capable of acting as a mainframe for several 
terminals. 

The CPU itself recognizes the DEC POP 1 1/34 instruction set 
and HT-DOS. Thus you can see the potential power built into the 
machine. It is capable of running FORTRAN. At $2595. the 
buyer is gaining a great deal of potential computer power for the 
money. 

In its standard configuration, this microcomputer is capable 
of addressing 64 K of memory, which includes 56 K of RAM and 
8K of system ROM. It is capable of further expansion thanks to 
the eight expansion slots on the S-IQO motherboard. It packs a 
great wallop for the money. 

Hewlett-Packard 

The S2750 Hewlett-Packard HP-87 is an all-in-one compu- 
ter. This is a dual-processor system that is driven by an eight-bit 
/>.'.'< in andaneight bit 80-scries CPU The user is able to take 
advantage of the wide variety of software available that runs 
under these processors . He is also able to take full advantage of 
the power built-into the Z80 because of the dual nature of this 
unit. 

The basic system consists of a 94-key keyboard that is con- 
tained in a slim-line terminal-type housing with 64K of RAM 
that is avaiable to the Z80 and 48K that is available to the 
80-series CPU. This system, via its high-resolution built-in 
CRT, also has high-level graphics capability. 

The system language is BASIC and it will run under either 
CP/M or H-P's own disk operating system. 

Another $2750 system is Hewlett-Packard's HP- 1 25. Also 
driven by an eight-bit Z80, this system has 64K of RAM stan- 
dard. This is more than enough RAM memory and when in- 
terfaced with dual minifloppy disks, this system provides 500K 
of mass storage. R-E 



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Electronics Paperback Books 

Quality Paperbacks at Affordable Prices 

CHECK OFF THE BOOKS YOU WANT 









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ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY TODAY INC. 
P.O. Box 83, Massapequa Park, NY 11762 



w 



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Number of books ordered 

Total Price of Books , . .$_ 

Sales Tax (NY State Residents) 

Shipping (75c 1st 2 books. 30c ea additional! 

TOTAL ENCLOSED $ 



Name. 



Address _.. . 

City State 

Prices good until Nov. 30, 1982 



ZIP 



$3000 to $3500 





$3000-$3500 



There's quite a bit 
to choose from 
in this price range. 
Among what you'll find are 
both basic systems and 
upgraded versions of 
less expensive machines. 

MARC STERN 



WHEN VOL' LOOK A I WHAT S AVAILABLE FOR BETWEEN S300fi 

and S350O. one thing immediately hits you — the number of 
systems on the market. Those are split just about 50-50 between 
upgrades of lower priced systems and sophisticated machines 
that were intended to sell for that price in their basic form. 
Among the ones in the later category are computers from giants 
Xerox and Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). 

Another thing that is apparent is that 16-bil machines are still 
not that common. True, there are a few, such as the one put out 
by DEC, but most arc still 8-bit machines. 

Xerox 

Let's begin by looking at the Xerox 82011. The microp- 
rocessor used here is a Z80A. The microprocessor and the 
12-inch, black-and-white monitor are housed in a single case: 
that monitor can display up to 24 lines of 80 characters each. The 
system also comes with a 96-key keyboard that includes a 
10-key keypad for rapid numeric data entry. (That type of 
keypad, included on so many keyboards, is a blessim 
pecially when a user is working with long arrays of numbers. 
The absence or presence of such a keypad is something that 
should be considered when comparing personal computers.) 

As you would expect with ;i computer at this price level and 
sophistication, it comes with 64K of RAM standard and two 
StA-tnch disk drives; those drives are capable of handling either 
single- or double-sided, double-density disks. The operating 
system is an enhanced version of CP/M. Eight-inch drives could 
also be used with the machine if desired. Two RS-232C serial 
ports and two parallel ports are provided for expansion. 

Among the nice features of this machine is its user friendli- 
ness For example, a menu-driven system is provided to help 
users over the rough spots. If you've ever used something like 
that, you know how much help it can be. 

This computer, which sells for S3295 . is an enhanced versii m 
of their 820. Among the improvements offered by the newer 



system is a faster microprocessor, an enhanced CP/M, and better 
use of memory space. The older version, which sells for S2995 . 
will still be available for a short time. Incident! y. Xerox will 
upgrade the older 820 to the 82011 for $400. 

DEC 

Digital Equipment Company (DEC), a giant in the mini- and 
smali-mainframc-computer field, has entered the microcompu- 
ter market with the introduction of three new personal -computer 
systems. One of those that falls within this price category is the 
Rainbow 100; it sells for S3495. complete with its special 
operating system (more on that later). 

Thai all-in-one system consists of a 103-key keyboard, 12- 
inch monochrome CRT monitor, and dual, double-density, 5 l /i- 
inch disk drives: those drives have a total storage capacity of 
800K. It also includes 64K of RAM. The lightweight 103-key 
keyboard is a separate unit and can be positioned for maximum 
user comfort. Some users have commented that they don't like 
the feel of the keyboard, but that may be because it is fairly 
sensitive and requires just a light touch. 

What sets that unit apart, however, is that this is a 16/8-bit 
dual microprocessor machine. It works much like other dual 
processor machines on the market — but with one major differ- 
ence. As the machine uses both a Z80 (8 -bit) and an 8088 
(16-bit), it will run programs written for either of those micro- 
processor. 

The idea of using dual microprocessors is not new. Formerly, 
however, two 8-bit microprocessors would be used — one would 
do the actual processing while the other handled the keyboard, 
display, etc. That effectively speeded up system access and 
function time because it eliminated the need for havinti a single 
CPU handle all the tasks. 

The same thing happens here too — one microprocessor hand- 
les the processing while the other take care of the housekeeping. 
The special CP/M-86/80 operating system determines whether a 



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91 




DEC'S RAINBOW 100 personal computer Is compact and can run either 
8-bit or 1 6-bit software. 



program is in 8- or 16-bit- word length form and invokes the 
appropriate microprocessor to run the program, with the other 
acting as a controller and handling the housekeeping. Thus, a 
user has access to the full capabilities of either a Z80 or 8088 
microprocessor. One big advantage to this scheme is that the 
user gains access to the latest 16-bit software without making 
obsolete his existing 8-bit CP/M software: that existing software 
often represents a considerable investment and would be very 
costly to replace. The Rainbow 100 can also run under Micro- 
soft's MS/DOS, a 16-bit operating system. 

Apple 

Apple, one of the best known names in personal computers, 
also has a system in this price catagory. That system, the Apple 
111 was developed to meet the needs of business as welt as for the 
advanced computer user. It sells for S3495 

Like the Apple 11 Plus, the Apple III is driven by an 8-bit 6502 
microprocessor. The chief advantage of this system is its large 
amount of built-in RAM. At 128K, it is among die leaders in 
memory capacity. If you wish, that RAM can be expanded to 
256K. 

The system comes with one built-in single-sided, double- 
density disk drive. If desired, up to three additional drives could 
be daisy-chained for a total of 560K of storage. For massive 
storage requirements, a 5 megabyte hard disk is available. 

Unlike the Apple U's 53-key keyboard, the integral 74-kej 
keyboard here includes a numeric keypad. Such a keypad great- 
ly speeds and simplifies the entry of long numbers. 



TABLE 7— S3000-S3500 



w 
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or. 

92 


Manufacturer 


Model 


Price 


CPU 


Word 
Lenqth 


Disk 

Operating 

System(s) 


Lanquaqe(s) 




Apple Computer 

20525 Mariani Ave. 
Cupertino, CA 
95105 


Apple III 


S3495 


6502 


8 bits 


SOS 1.1 


BASIC, Pascal 




Apple Computer 


Apple II 


$3020 


6502 


8 bits 


DOS 3.2 


BASIC, Pilot, 
Pascal. FORTRAN 




Digital Equipment 

Corp. 

Maynard, MA 01754 


DEC 100 


$3495 


8088 


B/16 
bits 


CP/M-86, MS-DOS 


MBASIC, C 




Heath Co. 
Benton Harbo, 
Ml 49022 


Z-90 


$3345 


280 


8 bits 


MDOS, CP/M 


BASIC, 

FORTRAN, COBOL, 
UCSD p-Pascal 




Heath Co. 


2-90-82 


$3191 


280 


8 bits 


HDOS, CPM 


BASIC, 

FORTRAN, COBOL, 
UCSD p-Pascal 


__ 


M/A COM OSI 

7 Oak Pk. 
Bedford, MA 01730 


OSI 
220C 


$3150 


6502 


8 bits 


OS-65D 


FORTRAN, BASIC, 
Pascal 




MA COM OSI 


OSI 
C100 


S3285 


6502 


8 bits 


OS-65D 


FORTRAN, BASIC, 
Pascal 




Radio Shack 

One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 
76102 


TRS-80 
Model 

III 


$3472 


280 


8 bits 


TRSDOS, 
CP'M (optional) 


COBOL, 

BASIC, FORTRAN, 

editor/assembler 




Sony Corp. 

7 Mercedes Dr. 
Montvale. NJ 07645 


SMC-70 


$3470 


280A 


8 bits 


CP/M 


BASIC, Pascal 





Sony Corp. 


SMC-70 


$3020 


Z80A 


8 bits 


CP/M 


BASIC, Pascal 




TeleVldeo Systems 
1170 Morse Ave. 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 


TeleVideo 
TS801 


S3295 


Z80A 


8 bite 


MmmmOST, CP M 


BASIC, FORTRAN, 
COBOL. Pascal, APL. 
Alqol, PL/1, Forth 




Tele Video Systems 


TeleVideo 
TS802 


$3495 


280A 


8 bits 


MmmmOST, CP'M 


BASIC, FORTRAN, 
COBOL, Pascal, APL 

Alqol, PL1, Forth 




Xerox-Office 

Products Dlv, 

1341 W. Mockingbird 

Lane, 

Dallas. TX 75247 


820I1 


S3295 


280 


8 bits 


CPM 


MBASIC, CBASIC, 
COBOL 



























The high-resolution 1 2-inch green phosphor CRT is capable 
of displaying up to 24 lines of 80 characters each. In the graphics 
mode, the resolution is 280 x 192 pixels, which is good. The 
system can also drive almost any black-and-white or color 
monitor: In-color graphics capability is standard. 

One of the beauties of this system is its expandability — eight 
expansion slots are provided. Even when the RAM is expanded 
to its full 256K, four slots remain for expansion. Apple man- 
ufactures a full line of peripherals including printers, color 
plotters, and modems. 

For present owners of Apple 11 systems, the Apple III has an 
emulation mode that will permit you to run your Apple II 
software. That is a big plus for those who already own a large 
inventory of Apple software— that software can be run on the 
new machine. 

Tele video 

Televideo has two systems in this price category, the TSS01 
and the TS802 . Those are essentially the same system — the only 
difference between them is that the TS801 . which sells for 
$3295, has a seperate keyboard, monitor, and system box, while 
the TS802, which sells for S3495, features an integrated unit 
with a detachable keyboard. Since those two systems are so 
much alike, let's treat them as one in our description. 

The heart of the system is a Z80 microprocessor. The unit 
comes with 64K of RAM standard- For mass storage, two 
double-sided, double-density. S'/j-inch disk drives are pro- 
vided. With those drives, a total of I megabyte of storage is 




$3000-$3500 



available. That gives the buyer quite a bit for his money. 

The CRT is a green-phosphor-type and is capable of display- 
ing 25 lines of 80 characters each. The keyboard is a 97-key 
typewritter-style unit. As it is housed in a seperate case in the 
TS80I and detachable in the TS802, the keyboard can be easily 
positioned for comfortable operation. 

One interesting feature of this system is the addition of a 4K 
EPROM. A user can format and program a specific routine or 
routines into the EPROM: those can be changed whenever the 
user wants because the EPROM is. of course, eraseable. 



1 

■ 

1 


Memory Storage 


Expansion 


Keyboard 


I/O 


Display 


Comments 


1 

O 

a 

3 

to 

CD 

to 
93 


128K/5%-inch 
1 loppy disk 




74 keys, 

13 key keypad 


serial 


80 x 24 text, up to 
180 x 192 graphics 


1 2-inch 
green monitor 


48K/dual S'/.-inch 
floppy disks 




53 keys 


serial, 

parallel 


40 x text, 

280 x 192 graphics 


1 2-inch 
qreen monitor 


64K/dual 5'/*-lnch 
floppy disks 




103 keys 


aerial 


80 x 24 


12- inch 
B&W monitor 


64K'5'/4-inch 
floppy disk 




84 keys. 

1 2 key keypad 


3 serial, 


80 x 24 


12-inch 
B&W CRT, 
mulli-mode 
interface card 


64K/S%-inch 
(loppy disk 




84 keys. 

12 key keypad 


3 serial, 


80 x 24 


12-inch B&W 


48K/dual 5 '/4-inch 
floppy disks 






serial 






4BK/dual 5'A-irtch 
floppy disks 






serial 






48K5V4-inch 
floppy disk 




65 keys, 

1 2 key keypad 


serial, 
parallel 


64(32) x 16 


integral 
display, 
printer 


64K 




72 keys. 

5 programmable 


serial, 
parallel 


up to 

840 x 230 


i2-ii 

color monitor 


64K~: 




72 keys, 

5 programmable 


serial, 
parallel 


up to 

840 x 230 


1 2-inch 

co Of monitor 


64K/duaf a5 '/i-inch 
floppy disks 




97 keys 


2 serial, 
1 parallel 


80 x 24 


green CRT 


64Kdual SVj-incri 
floppy disks 




97 keys 


2 serial 


80 x 24 


green CRT, 

satellite 

port 


64K/dual 5'/4-inch 
floppy disks 




96 keys, 

14- key keypad 


2 serial, 
2 parallel 


80 x 24 


12-inch 

B&W monitor 
















THE APPLE III with Sltenlype printer. 

On the software end, two operating systems are available. 

are CP.'M and MmtnOST Service Operating System, a 

Tclevideo proprietary operating system. Also, nine high-level 

programming languages are available — BASIC. FORTRAN. 

COBOL. Pascal. APL. Algol. PL/1, Forth, and C. 



Other systems 

The other systems available in this price range are upgrades 
oflower-priced systems; in general, those upgrades increase the 
power and/or flexibility of the basic system. For instance, the 
Apple II Plus reaches this price level if it is equipped with a 
Second double-density S'/i-inch disk drive. Doing so increases 
the formatted mass storage capacity to 280K. and the price to 
$3020. 

Adding a high-resolution (650 x 230 or 250 x 300 pixels) 
color display increases the price of the Sony SMC-70 to S3020, 
Doing so allows you to make maximum use of the system's 
eight-color capability. For a total system price of $3470 you can 
also add a second 3 ! /;-inch disk drive. That drive increases the 
storage capacity by 280K for a total system capacity of 560K. 

Radio Shack's TRS-80 Model III system can also be upgraded 
into this price range. For $3472. you can purchase what Radio 
Shack calls its Manager's System. That includes 48K of RAM, 
one double-density S'/t-inch disk drive, a line printer, and 
appropriate software including the VisiCalc spreadsheet pro- 
gram and SCRIPS1T word processing. Also included is a com- 
puter work desk. 

At $3195, an upgraded version of the Zenith ZS9 (also avail- 
able in kit form from Heath asther7#9) is available. That version 
includes one soft-sectored 5V.i-in.cri disk drive for a storage 
capacity of 160K. and 64K of RAM. 

M/A-Com-OSI also has two offerings in this category. Tor 
$3150, you can purchase the C20EM. That svstcm consists of 
the 6502-based computer, 48K of RAM, OSFs OS-65U operat- 
ing system, and two single-sided, double-density disk drives 
each allowing 275K of storage. 

The C4P-MF-4SK, with a price of $3000, offers 48K of RAM 
and two eight-inch disk drives. Those drives should give the user 
about 550K of total system storage capacity. That 6502-based 
system features color-video output and comes with modem, 
cassette, printer, and AC-control interfaces. R-E 



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I I-41H I0W1 Mlffl>C MM -IIUI5. 



Modem Kit 560.00 

Stale ol ita in, ong., answtf No tunmj nscei- 
sary 103 compatiWi 300 bant \mxvtmm 
acDusttc coupler plans mciudea Bo Only 
S17 00 Article in June Radio Electronics. 

Z60 Microcomputer 

16 oil I.O, 2 MHi clock 2K RAM ROM Bread- 
board space Excellent for control Bare Board 
$2B.M. Full Kit KM. M. Monitor $20.00. Power 
Supply K.i S35.00. Tiny Siiic jjq.do 




Video Modulator Kit S9.9S 

Convert TV set into a high quality monrtor w.^o 
afltctiiH) usaje Comp hi w.lull mstruc 

Multi-volt Computer Power Supply I 
8v 5 amp. ii8v samp it 1 5 amp, -5v 
5 amp. 12v Samp. -12v option. =5v, =t2vl 

are regulated Basic Kit S3S.9S . Kitwilh chassis | 
andalinardware 151.96. Add S4. 00 shipping 

60 Hz Crystal Time Base Kit $4.40 



INTRODUCING A BRAND NEW MICROCOMPUTER 

Uienture 



VENTURE is a single 

board computer [hat is an 
adventure tor the hobbyist 
II is a leamng training 
comp oi er as well as lust 
plain lun for anyone who 
warns id get into a state- 
of-!he-an computer at rea- 
sonable cost 

VENTURE comes in kil 
lorni or lull/ assembled 
and lested Vou can get it m us minimum con- 
figmation lor as little as $195.00 or lake II all 
ihe way to lloppy disks and voice It can be 
expanded as a kit or fully assembled, at ymtr 
own pace and choice. 

VENTURE is a 16" by 20" main board wilb 
separate ASCII and HEX keyboards It runs fast, 
almost A MHz and has the capability Dl putting 
almost 1 megabyte of RAM and ROM on ihe 
board along wilh a variety of inexpensive 
options 

On Board Options 

16 channel A to 0: S slot 60 pin bus. 2 serial 
ports, parallel ports, 3 video options. 4SK 




RAM. Volra* voice synthe- 
sizer, sound generator. 
EPR0M: full Basic, disas- 
sembler, edil or. assembler; 
metal cabinet, additional 
power supply. ASCII 
keyboard real lime clock 
calendar 

Expansion Options 
Floppy Disc. EPR0M Pro- 
grammer, light pen, uni- 
versal user programmable music sound hoard 
high resolution color/ grayscale pixel mapped 
video board. General Purpose Instrument Bus 
Minimum VENTURE System St95 00 
Kll includes CPU and control with 4K of RAM. 
IK of scratchpad. 2K monitor. 1661 video 
graphics, cassette interface and separate HEX 
keyboard with LED displays for address and 
output Power supply is included along wilh 2 
game cassettes The main board is 16" x 20" 
and includes space tor all ol the previously 
discussed on-board options Full on -hoard ex- 
pansion can be completed lor under S1000 00 
Call for funher details, option prices etc 



RCA Cosmac 1802 Super Elf Computer Kit $106.95 



The Super Ell is a tremendous value as il com- 
bines video, digital displays. LED displays, and 
music, all on a single hoard for $106 95. 
The Super Ell expansion capability is virtually 
unlimited and ypu can dp it inexpensively one 
step at a time Expansion includes cassette 
interface, additional memory, color video Ba- 
sic. ASCI I keyboard printer, lloppy. 5-100 bus. 
RS232 etc 

TheSuperElfcomescompletewlthpPwersup- 
ply and detailed 127 page instruction manual 
which includes aver 40 pages of software, in- 



cluding a series of lessons lo help get you 
started and a music program and graphics 
target game Many schools and universities are 
using the Super Elf as a course of study OEM s 
use it lor training and RID A monthly news- 
letter. Questdata is devoted exclusively lo soft- 
ware for the Super Ell and ihere are many soft- 
ware books available at low cost 
Free 14 Page Brochure 
Send or call for a free brochure on all delails 
and pricing of the Super Elf and us expansion 
We will gel it right out to you" 



Rockwell AIM 65 Computer 

6502 based single board with full ASCII keyboard ] 
and 20 column ihermal pnnter 20 char, alphanu- 
menc display ROM monitor., fully expandable 
$439.00. 4X version $454.00. 4K Assembler 
W5JM. 8K Basic 565.00 forth SB5. 00 



Elt II Adapter Kll $24.95 



PRCM Eraser 

assembled 26 PROM capacity $37.50 
(wilh timer $69.60) 6 PROM capacity OSHA 
UL version (78.50 Iwilh timer $108. 50 ■ 



TERMS: $5.00 min. order U.S. Funds. Calil. residents add 6% tax Prl( . es 

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Shipping: Add 5%: orders under $25 00— 10% lo change 



CIRCLE 31 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



FREE: Send tor your copy of our NEW 1982 
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Turn your TV into a time-sharing 
videotex display for $399: 



Now you can connect your family to 
the informative and entertaining world 
of CompuServe, The Source, Dow 
Jones News/Retrieval and other time- 
sharing and data-base networks. 

All you need is the RCA VP-3501 
Videotex Data Terminal (with built-in 
modem and RF modulator), your tele- 
phone and your TV set. You can get 
instant access to regional newspapers 
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sports results.., computer games and 
more. You can use the VP-3501 to 
make airline reservations... find restau- 
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the world. Plus stock market and cor- 
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send electronic mail and buy products. 

In addition to information retrieval, 
the VP-3501 provides full interactive 
communications with a host computer. 
What you have working for you is a 
versatile, feature-packed interactive 
data terminal which can be worth far 
more to you than its low price. Its 
unique color-locking circuitry gives you 
sharp color graphics and rainbow-free 
characters. You get 20- and 40- char- 
acter formats in one of eight fore- 
ground colors and separate color 
backgrounds. 



With reverse video, you can empha- 
size certain letters, words, or sen- 
tences. A built-in tone generator... plus 
a white noise generator... let you create 
everything from the sound of explo- 
sions to the sound of music. The spill- 
proof, easy- to-clean keyboard is highly 
suitable for hostile environments. And 
its membrane key switches give you a 
natural feel. 

The VP-3501 is truly a fine Videotex 
Data Terminal, And don't forget, it's 
made by RCA... the firs! name in tele- 
vision... now the foremost name in 
videotex terminals. 

See a demonstration at your com- 
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RCA. Order now and you'll get a free 
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For more information or to order, call 
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send a check including $3.00 delivery 
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Holland Avenue. Lancaster, PA 17604. 

'Suggested User Price. 



IPECIAL 
OFFER 

FROM 

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Order the VP3501 
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CIRCLE 17 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 






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LEARN HOW MICROPROCESSORS WORK FOR $149.95. 



The Micro-Professor MPF-1 is a 
serious, hands-on teaching device used 
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schools, corporate training programs, 
and individuals, worldwide. 

The heart of the MPF-1 is a Z-80 micro- 
processor. It is specifically designedto 
aid you in learning the architecture 1 
of the most popular 8-bit central 
processing unit on the market. In 
addition, with the MPF-1 you can do ■ 
breadboarding and prototyping for both 
hardware and software applications. 

The Micro-Professor MPF-1 features 
i 2k bytes of RAM (expandable to 4k} 
i 2k bytes of ROM (expandable to 8k) 
i 36 key calculator-type keyboard 
i Tiny BASIC interpreter for help in 
learning assembly language 
i Built-in speaker 
i Cassette recorder interface for program 

storage 
i 24 input/output lines 
i 3.5x1.36 inch breadboard area 
i Two 40-pin busses for the standard CPU 
and optional CTC/PIO allows for full 
expansion to Z-80 architecture 
capabilities 
i AC power supply included 
i Three instruction manuals include 
source monitor listing plus 18 experi- 
ments in hardware and software 
and the Micro-Professor comes in an 
attractive book-style carrying case for a 
micro price of only $149.95 with a 90-day 
unconditional written warranty. 



Z-80 is a registered trademark of Zilog Ire. 



CIRCLE 7 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




User options include 
Thermal Printer (PRT-MPF) $99.95 
20 column, alphanumeric, printer, in 
BASIC, with disassembler. 
EPROM Programming Board 
(EPB-MPF) $169.95 For all 5 

volt EPROMs (1KB, 2KB, 4KB). 
^^^ Read, copy, list and 
m verify capabilities. 
tig* Speech Synthesizer 
t^T Board (SSB-MPF) 

$139.95 A vocabulary 
of 1200+ words plus more in the future. 

If you're serious about learning (or 
teaching) how microprocessors work, 
now is the time to order the Micro- 
Professor. 

Individuals using the Micro-Professor 
MPF-1 outside of structured classroom 
situations should have at least a 



rudimentary knowledge of 
microcomputer technology. We will 
provide a list of appropriate literature 
to those who request it 




To order call toll free : 800-538-1542 

In California call 408-773-8400 




Multitech Electronics Inc. 

Name (Please Print) 

Address 

City 

Zip 



State , 

Signature 

Check or money order enclosed D 

VisaD Mastercharge □ 

Card No Expires . 



Far ■ur'her information or order: 

In U.S. and Canada mail to: 
Multitech Electronics Inc. 

195 West El Camino Heal 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 
Tel: 408-773-8400 
Tetr 178004 

MPF-1 Micro-Professor 

PRT-MPF Thermal Printer 

EPB-MPF EPROM Programming Board 

SSB-MPF Speech Synthesizer Board 

Shipping and Handling 

California residents add sales tax 

TOTAL 



Outside of North America mail to: 
Multitech Industrial Corporation 
977 Min Shen E Road, 105 
Taipei, Taiwan, ROC 
Tel. 02-769-1225 
TWX 19162 MULTIIC, 
23756 MULTIIC 



Qty. Amt. 



$149.95 
$99.95 
SI 69.95 
$139.95 
$4.95 



4.95 



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$3500 to $4000 




[HERE SONE Tf UNO CERTAIN ABOUT THE COMPUTER MARKET, 

it's that: the higher in price you go, the more systems seem to be 
avai tabic It's especial iy noticeable i f you take a close look at the 
personal computer marketplace. And, no matter how high you 
go into the price spectrum, two other certainties also stand out: 
The eight-bit processor is still the champ, without a doubt, and 
CP/M is still the leading operating system. 

Yes. it is true there arc some systems taking advantage of the 
new generation of 16-bit CPU's, but there aren't that many. In 
this price category, there arc only two systems that take advan- 
tage of it, white a third takes advantage of a proprietary 12-bit 
GPU. 

But, speaking of specific systems themselves, it is in this 
price segment of the marketplace that many computer systems 
really begin to mature into truly powerful machines. It is also in 
this pan of the spectrum thai several new machines make their 
appearance and we will look at them first. 

Three new names join the list at this juncture; those are 
Vector, North Star Computers, and Hitachi. 

Vector 

The $3995 Vector 1600 is a very powerful system. Its high- 
speed Z80B crunches data at the super-high clock speed of 6 
MHz. This system also features bank-switched RAM in 64K 
chunks. What this means is that while the operating system is 
resident in one 64K chunk of memory, the user can have another 
bank of 64K available for processing. This effectively reduces 
disk access time and it will allow for some spooling functions — 
using part of the memory for printing while the rest of the system 
is doing other tasks. 

Clearly designed for business applications, the Vector 1600 is 
CP/M-dedicatcd, Its operating system is CP/M 2.5. one of the 
latest releases. Thus, this system will support BASIC 80. BAS- 
IC Compiler, FORTRAN. COBOL and Pascal. It also supports 
a RAID debugging program and ZSM Assembler, as well as a 

powerful busincss-accounting/word processing package. 
The bank-switched memory also allows additional operating 

commands and new utilities to be added. User access to these 

functions is via a 72-kcy keyboard of which 1 keys are used as a 

numeric keypad for rapid numeric data entry. 



$3500-$4000 



Systems in this price range 
consist mainly of upgraded 
versions of more basic 
systems. But for the added 
cost, you get versatility 

MARC STERN 



This S-100 bus system has six card slots open on its mother- 
board and it will support a parallel printer without an optional 
interface. In fact, the three parallel ports are fully configurable 
by the user. 

Mass storage is available in two standard quad density 
(double-sided, double-density) 5'/s-inch minifloppy disks. This 
gives the user a total of 630K of potential storage, it also means 
there's more than enough storage for any task a user would like 
the system to tackle. 

The CRT is a 1 2-inch bit-mapped unit, capable of the industry 
standard 80-character by 24- line display. The bit-mapping is 
also attractive because it will allow the user to directly address 
screen memory and move the cursor any screen location. 

North Star 

From North Star Computers of San Leandro, CA. comes the 
dual -processor Advantage. This system is another of a number 
on the market that takes advantage of a secondary processor 
which handles such routine " hou sekeepi ng ' ' chores as serv icing 
the keyboard and floppy disk drive control functions. This 
allows the Z80A to perform its processing function unhindered. 
It also means the user gets the advantage of the CPU's 4 MHz 
clock speed for quick data access and retrieval . 

The operating system of this computer is North Star's CP/M- 
compatible Graphics BASIOGraphics DOS (GDOSj for high- 
level graphics funcions. 

One of the prime aims of this system seems to be at those 
industries or users needing powerful graphics capabilities. The 
operating system allows the user to take advantage of the high- 
level bit-mapped graphics capability of the Advantage. Resolu- 
tion of this system is 640 x 240 pixels, which will allow 
high-level graphics resolution. In the graphics mode, the Advan- 
tage will support both geometric and graphics functions. The 
four functions POLYGON. RECTANGLE. ELLIPSE, and 
SPECIAL LINE enable the drawing of points, lines and manv 
two-dimensional figures. Other commands such as CLEAR. 
BLOCK, and CHAR are used to control the display operation, 

The Advantage is another of the all-in-one computers on the 
market. It includes a standard green phospher CRT that is 



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capable not only of high graphics resolution, but also the in- 
dustry standard 80 x 24 display 

This system has an 87-key keyboard that includes 1 5 function 
keys and 14 numeric/cursor controls on a separate keypad. It 
will also support system expansion through six bus slots for such 
expansions as serial or parallel I/O interfaces or North Star's 
Floating Point Board. 

Dual quad-density S'/i-inch minifloppy disks provide a user 
with up to 360K of mass storage per drive or with up to 1 28 files 
per drive. 

Not only will the GDOS operating system support high-level 
graphics functions, it will also support the use of such high-level 
languages as CBASIC.MBASIC. FORTRAN, orCOEOL. The 
operating system is a superset of the industry-standard CP/M. 
Not only does the Advantage include a standard 64K of RAM . 
but it also has a separate 20K of display RAM. so the user can 
take advantage of the full-power of the bit-mapped screen. 

Altogether, (he $3999 North Star Advantage is quite a power- 
ful personal computer system that should be useful in (he office, 
a laboratory, or at home, 

Hitachi 

Another new name also appearing in this segment is Hitachi, 
which has long been known in the consumer electronics field. 
Hitachi's entry is the 53500, 16-bit MB 16001 personal compu- 
ter. The new Hitachi system is still another entrant in the 




DEC'S DECmats //computer Is primarily targeted for office management 
applications. 

burgeoning 16-bii processor segment of the personal computer 
market. 

Like other 16-bit systems on the market, a user is able to 
address a standard 128K of RAM — expandable to about 348K 
because of the amount of address space available in the 8088 
microprocessor. This processor provides enhanced, high- 
resolution multi-colored graphics and text displays. The compu- 
ter has a graphics display resolution of 640 x 400 pixels in eight 
different colors. The text and graphics can be overlaid while 
each is being individually colored. 

A modular system, the MB 16001 has a separate system box. 
keyboard and CRT. If the buyer opts for the color CRT. it can 
display 2.000 characters in 15 different textual colors. 

The 96-key keyboard features a numeric keypad for quick 
numerical data entry and 16 special function keys. 

Quite a capable system, mass storage is via quad-density 
5'/j-inch minifloppy disk drives. This gives this personal com- 
puter the potential of nearly 700K of mass storage. This feature 
permits large amounts of storage for data processing. 

The MB 16001 is equipped with one parallel printer port and 



will support communications (or other serial peripherals) 
through an RS-232C serial port. It comes equipped with a light 
pen as part of this MS/DOS machine. Under this DOS. the 
system will run a BASIC interpreter. FORTRAN. COBOL, 
Pascal or assembler software. Five built-in slots on the mother- 
board provide for further system expansion. 

New systems appearing from manufacturers already men- 
tioned in this supplement include another two from Digital and 
one from Radio Shack, the TRS-80 Model 11. 

Digital Equipment Corp. 

DEC's 53740 DEC mate 11 is actually an update and upgrade 
of an existing word processing system. This is one of the 
computers that makes use of something other than an eight-bit 
CPU. in this case a proprietary 12-bit CPU. the 6102. 1 1 also uses 
Digital's proprietary COS as its operating system. 

One of the three modular systems released in the middle ol 
this year, the DECmate II can easily interchange system pieces 
with cither the Rainbow 100 or the Professional series, which 
will be described shortly. 

Because it is now limited to using DEC's operating system, 
this system can't take advantage of the many CP/M -based soft- 
ware packages on the market. However, this shun Id soon be 
remedied as DEC has plans for a Z80 upgrade. 

Since this is a modular system, the buyer will find a separate 
system box. display and keyboard. The 103-kej keyboard in- 
cludes special function keys and a keypad for rapid numerical 
data entry. This system also includes a boostrap diagnostic 
routine that will inform the user of trouble in any area of the 
system on power-up. 

' This 12-bil system has 64K of standard RAM. This should be 
more than enough for any task this system will be called upon to 
perform. 

Mass storage is via dual quad-density 5 l /4-inch minifloppy 
disks. This allows the user to have access to nearly 800K of mass 
storage. It should also work well with this proprietary 12-bit 
processor in allowing (he user to do a great deal of work. 

Quite frankly, this system was designed for professional word 
processing applications and in those applications this system 
should easily fill the bill, especially with the amount of mass 
storage available. However, this business orientation does limit 
programming language availability to DIBOL, DEC's own 
business oriented language. 

The standard CRT is a high-resolution black and white moni- 
tor that is easily detached from the system and can be placed 
wherever the operator feels most comfortable. This is a good 
feature. 

DEC's other system in this price range is the Professional 
325. That unit sells for $3995. 

The Professional 325 is driven by a 16-bit proprietary CPU 
called the F-Il. As an example of its potential power, its 
instruction set is actually that of DEC's powerful PDP-1 1/23 
series. Thus, this system is easily able to work as a standalone or 
as part of a wider DEC-based system. It will easily recognize 
and work with other DEC systems. 

Quite frankly, according to the manufacturer, the Pro- 
fessional 325 is aimed at the small business or office. In light of 
this, it's easy to understand why DEC chose to give the user the 
greatest amount of RAM available as standard on the market, 
256K. This three-piece, modular system is quite capable of 
multitasking. 

Standard mass storage is 800K on dual-density 5'/i-inch flop- 
py disk and there is a Winchester 5'/j-inch hard disk drive 
available that will provide 5 megabytes. 

This computer probably has the best graphics capability on 
the market. It has a display resolution of 960 x 240 pixels and 
will generate eight basic colors, or a total of 256 shades. The 
cursor is addressable 

Both of the DEC systems can interface with peripheral equip- 
ment through either serial or parallel ports. 

An interesting feature of this series is the HELP key. This 
allows the user to address a ROM-resident HELP program and 



98 



menus. The DO key executes a function without the need to 
return to the special function keys. Also ROM-resident is a 
boostrap diagnostic program that will tell the user if any part of 
the system has failed. 

The operating system of this system is the company's pro- 
prietary P-OS. With this operating system, the user is able to run 
such high-level languages as the MBAS1C Compiler and the 
Mark Williams' Co. C Compiler. It will also address FOR- 
TRAN and UCSD-p- Pascal. The keyboard is the same one 
common to the DEC personal computers. 

Radio Shack 

From Radio Shack comes the TRS-SO Model II. with two 
versions available in this price category. lhe48K. one disk-drive 
model for S3450 and the 64K. one disk -drive model for S3899. 

Driven by a 4 MHz Z80A, this system is powerful even in its 
most basic configuration. In that standard configuration, this 
system comes equipped with48K of standard RAM, but this can 
be upgraded to 64 K. 

it is capable of creating the industry standard IBM-3741- 
format single-density disks with a Rcformatter software pack- 
age. However, to use this software, the system requires 64K of 
RAM and two or more drives. Under the TRSDOS operating 
system . this computer is capable of supporting a 1 7K disk-based 
BASIC interpreter that features detailed error flagging and quick 
editing. 

This language is capable of advanced string handling and full 
editing, as well as multidimensional arrays and error trapping. It 
is also capable of program line renumbering and hex and octal 
conversion, as well as direction and sequential access to data in 
disk files. It also has the ability to execute TRSDOS commands 
and then return to BASIC with the program and variables intact. 
It is also capable of calling machine language subroutines. 

Among the basic features of the TRS-80 Model II are a 76-key 
keyboard that includes a numeric entry keypad. Keyboard keys 
include hold, Escape, brkak, ctrl, caps and REPEAT. 

This is another of the all-in-one computers on the market and 
it includes a standard. 12-inch black and white CRT that is 
capable of displaying cither the industry standard 80 x 24 lines 
or double-sized characters at 40 x 24 -lines. 

Mass storage is provided by a single, built-in double density 
eight-inch floppy disk drive. The disk is capable of holding 
4I6K. 

System expansion is aided by a parallel port and two RS-232C 
serial ports. This will allow system expansion to include print- 




S 
@ 



IDEAL FOR 
Is powerful 



BUSINESS APPLICATIONS, the Radio Shack TRS-SO Model II 
In even Its basic configuration. 



gg $3500-$4000 



ers, plotters, and digitizers. These ports also support com- 
munication with other computers. This computer also includes 
four bus slots for future expansion or for adding memory. 

lntert.ee 

The next system which makes its appearance in this category 
is Intenec Data System's $3500 SuperBrain SD. In reality, this 
is a system upgrade of the SuperBrain line. This system, too. is 
another of the all-in-one computers on the market. 

The key difference between this Superbrain and the others in 
the lineup is the amount of mass storage. Though this computer 
also uses SW-inch minifloppy disks, the drives are configured 
for 1.5 megabytes of storage using dual quad-density. 

Still a dual-processor personal computer, this unit is driven by 
dual Z80's with clock speeds of 4 MHz. System RAM is a 
standard 64K. which is more than enough for speedy operation 
of the system 'sCP/M operating system. The system's high- level 
language is BASIC. 

Like other dual-processor personal computers, the Super- 
brain SD uses one CPU for system work, while the other handles 
"'housekeeping" chores such as the display and keyboard. This 
permits the primary CPU to devote all its capacity to processing 
data. 

And, like the other SuperBrain models, the SD has a built-in 
76-key keyboard and 18-kcy numeric keypad for quick data 
entry. The keyboard is also capable of generating the full 128 
character ASCII set. 

The standard 12-inch green phosphor CRT is capable of the 
industry standard 80 x 24-line display, and it interfaces with 
peripherals or can be used for communications via two built-in 
serial ports. 

Cromemco 

Micromainframe computers arc available in all price categor- 
ies, and $3500 to $4000 is no exeception. From Cromemco 
comes the System One or CS-I for $3995. Driven by a 4-MHz 
Z80 CPU, the System One is meant for cither single or multi- 
users. It is expandable and comes with an eight-slot card cage so 
a user can easily expand the basic system. 

Dual quad-density 5>/j-inch floppy disk drives provide a user 
with 780K of mass storage. This feature alone makes this system 
powerful foreither the single-useror in a multi-user enviroment. 

The standard 64K of RAM is easily able to run the company's 
proprietary RDOS. Word-processing software is available with 
Writemasier. Software is also available for interfacing a light 
tablet and pen. There is also a database management system 
available. The CS-I will interface with a printer via a parallel 
port. 

The power of this system is evident in the languages it is 
capable of supporting. A long list, those languages include 
Structured BASIC. FORTRAN. COBOL. C. RatFor and Lisp 
This system can also support the UNIX-like CROMIX multi- 
user operating system. 

continued on page 102 



O 
a> 
m 

§ 

K> 



TABLE 8— S3500-S4000 






Word 


Disk 
Operating 




Manufacturer Model 


Price 


CPU 


Length 


System(s) 


Lanquaqe(s) 


Apple Computer Apple III 


53990 


6502A 


8 bits 


SOS 1.1 


BASIC. Pascal 



20525 Mariani Ave. 
Cupertino. CA 
95014 



Cromemco 
■ 280 Bernardo Ave. 
. Mountain View, CA 

94040 



CS-1 



$3995 



Z80A 



8 bits 



RDOS 



COBOL. C. CROMIX, 
Structured BASIC, 
RATFOR, FORTRAN. 
LISP 



. 



Digital Equipment 
Corp. 

Mayward, MA 
01754 



Professional 
325 



S3995 



F-11 

(POP 11/23) 



16 
bits 



P'OS 



BAStC-Plus-2 
FORTRAN. DiBOL 
UCSD p- Pascal 



Dlgitai Equipment 
Corp. 



DECMate II 



S37-:C 



proprietary 



12 

bits 



CPM.COS310. 
WPS8 



DiBOL 



Hitachi Sales 

Corp. 

401 W. Artesia 

Compton, CA 

90220 



MB16001 



S3500 



B088 



16 
bits 



MS DOS 



BASIC, FORTRAN. 
Pascal, assembler 



■ Intertec Data 

Systems 

1 2300 Broad River Road 
'(Columbia. SC 

29210 



SuperBrain SD $3500 



Z80 



8 bits 



CP.'M 



BASIC, other 
CP'M compatible 



MA COM OSI 

7 Oak Pk. 
Bedford. MA 
01730 



OSI 
C4P-DF-HR 



$3615 



6502 



B bits 



OS-65D 



BASIC 



MA COM OSI 



OSI 
C8P-DF-48K 



S3640 



6502 



8 bits 



OS-65D 



BASIC 



M/A COM OSI 



C8P-DF-HR 



53850 



6502 



8 bits 



OS-65D 



BASIC 



Micro Source 
J595 N. Clayton Rd. 

New Lebanon, OH 
•45345 



M6000P 



$3900 



Z80 



8 bits 



CPM 



BASIC, UNIX, 
other CP/M 
compatible 




MicroTechnology 
Unlimited 

Box 12106 
Raleigh, NC 
27605 



MTU 
130-2D 



$3599 



6502 



8 bits 



CODOS 



BASIC, UCSD p- 
Pascal 



NEC Home Elec. 
M401 W. Estes Ave. 
Oak Grove. IL 
60007 



NEC 
PC-8001 



S3740 



uPD 780 C-1 
(Z80-like) 



8 bits 



CPM 



BASIC. FORTRAN. 
Pascal. COBOL 



NEC Home Elec. 



NEC 
PC-8001 



53984 



uPD 780 c-1 
(Z80-likel 



8 lilts 



CPM 



BASIC, FORTRAN, 
Pascal, COBOL 



North Star 

Computers 
. 1 440 Catalina 
JSan Leandro. CA 
594577 



North 

Star 

Advantage 



S3999 



Z80 



8 bits 



CPM, G-DOS 



GBASIC, other 
CPM compatible 



Olivetti 

155 White Plains Rd. 

Tarry town, NY 

10591 



M-20 



53560 



Z8001 



16 
bits 



PCOS 



BASIC 



o 
z 
o 

rx 



o 
< 



Olivetti 



M-20 



$3789 



Z8001 



16 

bits 



PCOS 



BASIC 



Radio Shack 
One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth. TX 
76102 


TRS-80 
Model III 


S3972 


Z80 


8 bits 


TRSDOS 


COBOL. 

BASIC, FORTRAN, 

editor assembler 


Radio Shack 




TRS-80 
Model II 


S3450 


Z80 


8 bits 


TRSDOS 


COBOL. 

BASIC. FORTRAN. 

editor assembler 


Radio Shack 




TRS-80 
Model II 


S3899 


Z80 


8 bits 


TRSDOS 


COBOL, 

BASIC. FORTRAN, 

editor assembler 


Sony 

7 Mercedes Dr. 

Montvale. NJ 
07645 




SMC-70 


$3675 


Z80A 


8 bits 


CPM 


BASIC, Pascal 


Vector Graphics 
500 N. Ventu Pk 
Thousand Oaks. 

91320 


Inc. 

Rd. 
CA 


1600 


53995 


Z80 


8 bits 


CP/M 


BASIC. FORTRAN, 
COBOL, other CP'M 
compatible 



100 



Memory Storage 


Expansion 


Keyboard 


IO 


Display 


Comments 


128K 




74 keys. 13-key 
keypad 


serial 


80 x 24 text, 
280 x 192 
graphics, 16 colors 


12-inch 
green CRT 


65Kdual 5V4-inch 

- 






parallel 






256K dual 5%-inch 
floppy disks 




103 keys 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x 24 


12-inch 
display 


96Kdual 5%-inch 
floppy disks 




" 03 keys 


serial 


80 ■■ 24 


12-inch 
display 



128Kdual SVMncrl 
(loppy disks 




96 keys 



serial, 
parallel 



80 (40) x 24 lexl, 
up to 640 X 400 
graphics 



12-inch 
monochrome or 
color display 



64Kdual 5Vi-inch 
floppy disks 



80 keys 



2 serial 



80 x 24 



12-inch 
green display 



24K dual 8-inch 
(loppy disks 




serial, 
parallel 


256 x 512 color 
graphics 




48K/dual 8-inch 
floppy disks 




serial, 
parallel 


256 ;• 512 color 
qraphics 




48K dual 8-inch 
floppy disks 






256 x 51 2 color 


8-slot 

mother 

board 


64K ; dual 5 
floppy disks 


standard 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x 24 


display 



SOK/dual 8-inch 
floppy disks 



96 keys. 

8 programmable 



1 serial. 

2 parallel 



80 • 24 



12-inch 

green 

display 



64Kdual 5<A-inch 
floppy disks 


84 keys. 

5 user-definable 


serial. 
parallel 




12-inch 
color display 


96K/dual 5'A-inch 
floppy disks 


84 keys, 

5 user-definable 


serial, 

parallel 


80 x 24 text, 

160 ■ 100 qraphics 


color disolav 



64K dual 5%-inch 
floppy disks 



87 keys 



serial, 
parallel 



80 ■: 24 



integral 

green 

display 



_ 



128K 
floppy disks 




72 keys 


serial, 
parallel 


80 ■ 25 lexl. 

512 x 256 graphics 


12-inch 
B&W display 


i60K.'dual SVj-inch 
floppy disks 




72 keys 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x 25 text, 

516 ■ 256 graphics 


12-inch 
B&W display 


48K'dual 5%-inch 
(loppy disks 




65 keys. 

1 2- key keypad 


serial, 

parallel 


64(321 < 16 


integral 

B&W 

display 


48K 8-inch 




7G keys. 


serial. 


80 (40i ■ 24 


integral 



2 programmable 



parallel 



76 keys, 

2 programmable 



serial, 
parallel 



80(40) - 24 



B&W 

display 



integral 

B&W 

display 



64K/|riple 
3VHnch 
micro-floppy disks 



73 keys, 

6 programmable 



serial. 

parallel 



30 • 24 text, 
up to 640 - 230 
graphics 



12-inch 

color 
display 



O 

CD 

m 

3 

to 

OP 
101 



64K 

8-inch (loppy disk 



72 keys 



80 - 24 



parallel 



display 



ither systems 

System upgrades show the power that is built into personal 
computers. For instance, the TRS-80 Model III, when equipped 
with dual 5'/i-inch drives that provides the user with up to 306K 
ol' mass storage (single-sided double-density) and a tine Printer 
V! printer, costs S3655. This price, however, doesn't include a 
RAM upgrade from 48K to 64K 

MicroSource's M6OQ0P portable, fully configured but with- 
out a Winchester hard disk, tops out at $3900. This configura- 
tion includes 368 K of mass storage on dual, single-sided, 
double-density minifloppy disks, and a CRT and keyboard. 

The Olivetti M-20 is now reaching its fully configured state. 
With the addition of a second dual quad-density S '/4-inch mini- 
floppy disk, this 16-bit CPU-driven system costs S3. 560. This 
gives the user the potential of 640K of formatted storage. It also 
gives the user the full advantage of the 16-bit CPU. 

System upgrades continue with MicroTechnology Unlim- 
ited's MTU-I30. When this system is equipped with dual, 
eight-inch quad-density floppies, the mass storage of this system 
becomes 2 megabytes, quite a large amount of space. This 
amount of storage helps to make up for any shortcomings in the 
processing speed of its 1 MHz, 6502 CPU. The system now 
includes 80K of RAM. five expansion slots on the motherboard. 
96-key keyboard, 12-inch green monitor. 2 parallel ports, and 
one serial port. It is now nearly fully configured, except for the 
MC68O0O0 processor board option or a hard disk drive. 

With the addition of a second single-sided, double-density 
5'A-inch minifloppy disk, the price of the 1 28K RAM Apple III 
system rises to S3990. The standard CPU on this system, as 
described earlier in this supplement, is a 1.8-MHz 6502A. 

NEC's PC -8000 upgrades twice in this price range. For 
S3734, the buyer gets the Z80-like pPD 780 C- 1 processor with 
a 4 MHz clock speed. This version of the system includes 64 K of 
RAM, dual single-sided, double-density disks for 280K of mass 



storage, expansion slots, 84-key keyboard, and parallel and 
serial I/O pons. The key addition to this system is the high- 
resolution, 12-inch color monitor. Increasing the amount of 
RAM to 96K on the PC-8000A, the user will spend $3984, but 
will also gain more power in the system. 

With three microfloppy disk drives, the Sony SMC-70 has its 
amount of mass storage increased to 840K. In the $3675 ver- 
sion, the third drive has been added for greater storage. The 
basic system includes 64K of RAM. CP/M. a 73-key kej hoard 
and five expansion slots. 

M/A-COM-OSI has three system upgrades in this price range. 
The 4P-DFHR at $36 1 5 otters the buyer a I MHz eight-bit 6502 
CPU with a slow 1 -MHz clock speed. (This CPU is common to 
allOS! products. (This system features 24K of RAM, but550K 
of mass storage on dual eight-inch floppy disks. The potential is 
there for a color video output, and the company provides in- 
terfacing capabilities for a cassette recorder, modem, and D/A 
converter. This system is capable of supporting a display resolu- 
tion of 512 x 256. 

OSl's C8P-DF-48K provides the same basic features as the 
C4P. but the amount of internal RAM is expanded to 48K. It is 
priced at S3640. 

And. the OS! C8P-DF-HR. at $3850. is an upgrade of the 
C8P-DF-48K with the addition of an eight-slot bus for system 
expansion. 

Even the Texas Instruments T1-99I4A has an entry in this price 
category at $3524. This version of the 48K system includes a 
speech synthesizer module. 

When you add a printer to the 64K, dual Z80 driven Heath 
Zenith Z90, the cost of this system rises to $3590. The Z90 is 
one of the many all-in-one systems on the market. It includes a 
full keyboard and 12-inch black-and-white CRT in the same 
housing. It looks like the traditional computer terminal v^ ith 
which nearly everyone is familiar. R-E 



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102 



COMPUTERS 

ATARI" 800 ,M 
COMPUTER SYSTEM 



BOO* I6K »6990O 

*80O Computer w/48K 

*•* '790.00 




ATARI PERIPHERALS: 



Pimii S2S - 650™ 

Disk r> 810- 4SS0O 

Fl«ord 410- 83°° 

P»*iMp<! >tB9S 

Joystick IPN 

32k HAM- 17395 

B«ieC»rT-49°0 



Pac-Man — $36.95 



Aatwwds ^ 
MiHto < ::•:,.'-> 32 50 
Sott Brk Or; 
Asw<n Etjit - 49W 
5111 Fyrfeti-4EP° 
Bmkeiball- 28" 
Cr»ss-32«> 



[Diskette Storage BOX 

♦ HARD PLASTICS 

5'-Wh— '5.00 w 



8.n 



,-* $4.75 



ea. 



Bare Bones APPLE II 



48KRAM 



Keyboard 
Pwr. Supply 



Microswitch: Power Supply : APPIE 
Keyboard '■ Samp- : Reference Man I 

*79.95 : *124po : *18.oo 



*SPECIALS*| 

3 Inch Mint FAN — ^'8.85 
am — ^245 
8155— *1 1.50 
ER2S01— .-*4.95 
AV51013A — -'.2.95 

8202 — *29.95 
6522— *S25 

8255 —'5.95 

a 7*a -a -~*3LO0 

MC6800 —'7.75 
MC6302 - 'M95 

Mcsaso — *4.50 
mcmii — M.95 
6331— *1,25 



4116-2— B/12P" 

2716(5vl— 3.75m, 

2732(5vl— 8.75ea. 

2532(5ul- B75ea. 

Z80A£PlH^5.Z5ea. 

1982 1c" 
(2vol.| Master 

*59.95 



CONCORD 



COMPONENTS 



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AMAHE1M. CALIF 92806 

1714)937-0637 »*y ^.. 

- LHlt« - WO \°j\»*" "* 

MO too c 

'10 MIN OKUtK (.» Mi «00<> 



.1.1 »,"W -}/J 

m rSrvS 



$J° FREIGHT 



MONITORS 
ZENITH *ZVM-121 

12in.15MHl./GP,EEN Plies. 

$113.00 



J.C.S.*kG-12 

12 in, 19MHi, /GREEN Phos. 
Mon- Glare Screen Jnjicn 



BMC#BM-12A 

12m. ISMHiJ GREEN Phos. 

* 89.50 



AMDEK#CM-13(COLORI) 

13in./COLOR!! 

*375.00 



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CIRCLE 29 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



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CIRCLE 18 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 






$4000 to $4500 




Systems in this price range 
consist mainly of upgraded 
versions of basic 
systems. But for the added 
cost, you get versatility, 

MARC STERN 



»N OK ANOTHER, IT SEEMS H!.\l t"HERI \KI 

relatively few computers priced between S4000 and S4500 — 
must are either priced higher or lower. What's more, most of 
what's available are simply upgrades of lower priced systems. 

One system that fits into this category is the Sharp YX3200. 
another of the many Z8Q-based personal computers on the 
market Thai system sells for 53495.00; adding the companion 
80-column, bidirectional, dot-matrix printer, which sells for 
S895.00. brings the price up to S4390.GO for a fully configured 
system. 

The YXJI200 comes \vithft4K of RAM: ROM is expandable to 
T 2K Mass storage is handled using two double-sided, double- 
density 5'/j-ineh floppy-disk drives; those allow a potential of 
284K of storage per drive. The computer uses cither Sharp's 
own FDOS (FLOPPY Disk Operating System 1 or CP/M; both 
come standard with the system. 



Included in the unit's 92-key keyboard are 1 user-definable 
keys and a numeric keypad for rapid data entry. Although we've 
commented on numeric keypads briefly in other parts of this 
section, their importance can't be underestimated. If you've 
ever had to enter long lists of numbers, you know what I mean. 
You certainly could do it using the numbers found on a standard 
typewritter-stylc keyboard, but the procedure is cumbersome 
when compared to using a numeric keypad. The key hoard. 
incidently. is capable of producing the full ASCII character-set 

Standard with the system is a 1 2-inch green CRT display The 
display can show up to 24 lines (actually 25, but one is a status 
line) of 80 characters each. 

The unit also has five I/O ports to facilitate system expansion. 
llnse can be used to add additional drives, for RS232C com- 
munications ( the interfaces are included with the system), etc. A 
parallel port is provided for the printer. 






</> 
o 
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o 
tr 

O 
LU 
_J 
UJ 

6 

< 

rr 
104 


TABLE 9— S4000-S4500 

Manufacturer 


Model 


Price 


CPU 


Word 

Length 


Disk 

Operating 

System(s) 


Lanquaqe(s) 


Commodore Business 

Machines 

487 Devon Pk. Rd. 

Wavrte, PA 19087 


CBM 8032 


$4084 


6502 


8 bits 


proprietary 


" 


Commodore Business 
Machines 


SuperPET 
9000 


$4085 


6809 6502 


8 bits 


proprietary 


APL, BASIC. Pascal, 
FORTRAN, assembler 


Zenith Data Systems 
1 00 Milwaukee Ave. 
lGlenview, IL 60025 


Z90 


341 90 


Z80 


8 bits 


HDOS. CP M 
(optional) other 
CPM compatible 


BASIC. UCSD p- 
Pascal. FORTRAN, 


IBM Information 

Systems 

P.O. Box 1328 

Boca Raton. FL 33432 


PC 


$4425 


8088 


16 
bits 


PCDOS, 

CP'M (optional) 


BASIC Compiler, 
UCSD-Pascal IV, 
COBOL 


Sharp Electronics 
10 Keystone PI. 
Paramus. NJ 07652 


YX3200 


S4495 


Z80A 


8 bits 


FDOS, 

CPM 


BASIC, 
other CP.'M 
compatible 


Sony Corp. 
! 7 Mercedes Dr. 
Montvale, NJ 07645 


SMC-70 


$4195 


Z80A 


8 bits 


CPM 


BASIC, Pascal, 
other CP/M 
compatible 


Texas Instruments 
PO Box 225013 
Dallas. TX 75265 


TI-994A 


$4174 


TMS990Q 


16 

bits 


proprietary 


BASIC 


I 
















w 





u 



$4000-$4500 



EXPANSION MODULES lor the Sony SMC-70. Along with the modules, the 
light pen and numeric keypad are shown. 




THE ZENITH ZM is an upgrade of the Z89. The term tn a I- type housing looks 
Identical tor both computers. 

This system is designed with the user in mind. In addition tn 
FDOS and CP/M, the system price includes CBASIC and Sharp 
BASIC programming languages. Jn addition, the YX32Q0 boasts 
what it calls "Automatic Program Generation." That allows a 
user with no knowledge of programming to create business 
forms in three steps. A series of prompts leads the user through 



: creation of the program with a scries of graphics displays and 
yes/no answers — sort of a spreadsheet program with a built-in 
helping hand. 

Other systems 

The fully eon figured IBM Personal Computer (the more basic 
versions are described elsewhere in this section) also reaches 
this price level. At $4425, the system includes a 16-bit 8088 
CPU, 2S0K of disk storage, a 1 2-inch green CRT. and I28K of 
RAM, The key difference in this system is that the amount of 
RAM has been doubled. 

Another system whose highest price falls in this range is the 
Sony SMC-70. In its maximum configuration, this system sells 
for 54195,00 and includes three disk drives and 64K of RAM. 
perm ittingover840K of mass storage. It also includes a 12-ineh. 
high-resolution color monitor for color graphics. 

The Texas Instruments TI-99/4A can also reach this range by 
adding a disk drive to the 48 K system. That system, which also 
includes a printer, speech synthesizer, modem, and com- 
munications program package, sells for S41 74.00. 

When you upgrade the Commodore Business Machines' 
8032B business system to 96K of RAM and add a printer, its 
price rises to $4085. Adding a printer to their SuperPET 
SP90QO, which has 96K of built-in RAM. also increases the 
price to that figure. Complete descriptions of those systems can 
also be found elsewhere in this section. 

And, by adding the $995 printer to the Zenith Z90, the price of 
this system come up to $4190. That computer is a dual processor 
Z80-bascd unit and features an integral keyboard and 1 2-inch 
monitor. R-E 





Memory /Storage 


Expansion 


Keyboard 


I/O 


Display 


Comments 


I 

CD 

m 

- 3D 
1 

tos 


96K'dual 5%-inch 
floppy disks 




standard, numeric 
keypad 


IEEE-488 


80 x 25 


integral 12-inch 

B&W 

monitor 


1 


96K'dual 5%-inch 
floppy disks 




standard, numeric 
keypad 


IEEE-488 


80 x 25 


ii integral 
1 2-inch B&W monitor 


64K/8-inch 
floppy disk 




84 keys, 

1 2 function keys 


serial, 


80 x 24 text, 
33 graphics 
characters 


printer, 
12-inch 
B&W monitor 




28K dual 5v*-inch 
floppy disk 




83 keys, 10-key 
keypad, 10-special- 
f unction keys 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x 24 


1 1 Vi -inch 
green CRT 




64rCdual S'/i-inch 
floppy disk 




92 keys, 1 
programmable 


serial, 


80 x 24 






64Ktriple 3 1 / 2 -inch 
micro-floppy disk 




72 keys, 

5 programmable 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x text, 

640 x 230 graphics 




48Ki'5%-inch 
(loppy disk 




standard 


serial 


32 x 24 text, 

192 x 256 graphics 


printer 















$4500-$6000 



There are many computers to choose from in this 
price range. Many new systems make their first 
appearance here and many systems reach their 
maximum expansion and full potential. 



MARC STERN 



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106 



WHEN YOU REACH THE HIGH END OF THE PERSONAL COMPUTER 

spectrum, the competition really begins to gel lively. Many new 
computer systems make their first appearance in this category. 
Also included in this category are those systems that have been 
steadily improving in power and performance as they have 
become more expensive. 

A minimum of 1 new systems make their first appearance in 
this price category, with the names of such computer man- 
ufacturers as Altos, Vector Graphic and Zenith joining the list of 
manufacturers offering high-end systems. (Zenith is the parent 
of Heath, which offers the Heath/Zenith series i Canon, long 
known in the consumer photography and electronics fields, has 
also brought out its own computer system, while Hev\ lett- 
Packard's HP -87 series reaches its most powerful level in this 
spectrum. 

Canon 

Taking a look at the $4995 Canon CXI . we find it is driven by 
an eight-bit 6809 CPU . The system comes with 64K RAM as 



standard, which is more than enough user memory to allow this 
system to access and retrieve data quite quickly. This operating 
system is Canon's proprietary floppy Disk Operating System 
and it supports the BASIC. Assembler and ANSI COBOL 
programming languages. 

This system is frankly aimed at the business market and 
because it is itcomes as an all-in-one unit. The terminal contains 
an 84-key keyboard, that includes a 1 4-key function/numeric 
keypad, dual 5 '/a-inch minifloppy disk drives and a ! 2-inch 
green phosphor CRT. 

Interestingly, the keyboard is a dual-mode unit. In one mode it 
is a full ASCII keyboard, capable of generating the entire 
96-character ASCII set. while in the other mode it is a pro- 
gramming keyboard with one-key functions for such BASIC 
language programming commands as get, put. gosub, close, 
dim. Those functions are spelled out on legends on the front of 
the keys. 

Mass storage is accomplished via dual double-sided, double- 
density minifloppy disks that arc capable of storing up to 320K 
per disk. 

The CRT's display is the industry-standard 80 columns 
{characters) by 24 lines and the system is capable of displaying 
32 graphic characters and special symbols. 

Hewlett-Packard 

Hewlett-Packard' s HP-87 personal computer becomes quite a 
powerful system in this price category. Like other personal 
computers, this one has its origins in the sub-S2500 category. 
However, as it climbs through the price spectrum its power 
builds until it reaches S5190. 

At this price level, the system includes an 80-series 8-bil 
processor, along with the CP/M operating system. This means 
the user has access to the wide variety of software available that 
runs under CP/M. while, at the same time, having access to 
software which runs solely under Hewlett-Packard's proprietary 
operating system. 

This system has a total of 1 12K of system RAM, which is 
more than enough to allow this svstcm to take advantage of the 
full power and speed of both the 80-scriesCPU and theZSOCPU 
and CP/M. A total of 540K of mass storage is available on two 
5V'j-inch double -density minifloppy disks. 

Vector Graphics 

The Vector Graphics ?600 is another system thai makes iis 
first appearance in this price category. At $5195. this system 
packs a great deal of power. For starters, this system uses a fast 
clock speed of 6 MHz to drive its eight-bit Z80 CPU. This means 
it can handle just about any task thrown at it with high speed. 
When this is combined with the bank-switched 64K of standard 
RAM. you can see this system has j great deal of capability. 

The reason that bank-switched memory is attractive is be- 
cause the computer's operating system i^ loaded into one bank o1 
memory, leaving the second bank of memory nearly dee f< it user 
access. (This reduces the amount of disk access time and allows 



w 



printing while the system is handling other functions.) 

This system operates under one of the later versions of CP/M . 
version 2,5. Because it does, the user has access to the many 
programs written for this nearly universal operating system. The 
user also has access to such high-level programming languages 
as a BASIC Compiler, which runs more quickly than a BASIC 
Interpreter program, FORTRAN, COBOL. Pascal. RAID la 
program debugger). Scope (a wool processor) and BASIC 80. 
As you can see. this system is equipped to handle just about any 
task a user may think up. 

The key upgrade in the Vector 2600 is the increase in the 
amount of mass storage. Still residing on two S'/j-itrch mini- 
floppy disks, mass storage now rises to 1 .2 MB on 80-track dual 
quad-density disks. This amount of storage is ideal for business, 
scientific or personal computer applications. 

Equipped with a standard 72-key keyboard, this system also 
includes a 10-key numeric pad tor rapid data entry. It interfaces 
with peripherals via three parallel or one serial port. The 1 2-inch 
CRT is capable of the industry standard 80 x 24 display. This 
display is bit-mapped which allows a user to have direct access 
to the display memory and allows the use of customized 
graphics. 

The Veetor2600 is another of the all-in-one personal comput- 
ers on the market. It includes the keyboard. CRT and system box 
in one terminal. 

Zenith 

Zenith has a new entry in this price category, its new Z-100, 
another of the i 6/8-bit dual-processor personal computers now 
appearing on the market. It is also an all-in-one personal compu- 
ter. The Heath Company will also be offering a kit version of this 
computer. 

This new system gives the user the advantage of both eight-bit 
and 16-bit power with an 8085 eight-bit CPlfand a 16-bit 8088. 
The operating systems to which the user has access are CP/M 
and Z-DOS. This system is compatible with the IBM's PC-DOS 
operating system. In addition, the (loppy disk format is also 
compatible with IBM's format so that floppy disks containing 
software for the IBM computer will run directly on the new 
Z-iOO and thus providing access to the rapidly expanding do- 
main of IBM personal computer software. 

The under-55000— pricing hadn't been established at press 
time — Z-100 system is full -featured, with 128K of standard 
RAM. or more than enough for all but the most ambitious data 
base management or spreadsheet routines. This RAM is expand- 
able to 192K on the main processor board and will expand to 
768K through the use of the built-in expansion slots in the 
system area. 

Standard mass storage is via dual quad-density 320K built-in 
5'/t-inch minifloppy disks. Eight-inch floppies and a Winchester 
hard-disk drive with 5 megabytes of storage will be available as 
options. 

The system offers two versions of BASIC — BAS1C-85 and 
Z-BASIC. The Z-BASIC is an enhanced version that includes 
many color-graphic commands. The 108-key keyboard includes 
13 user-definable special-function keys. 

The standard monochron mtic screen is capable o( the standard 
80 x 24 display, while an optional color monitor is also avail 
able. This system is capable of generating high-level color 
graphics with a resolution of 225 lines x 640 dots, It is also 
capable of resolution of up to 500 lines. An RGB color signal is 
available at the rear pane I 

The Z-100 is capable of both asynchronous and synchronous (as 
well as half- and full-duplex) communications and the system 
will interface with peripherals via cither two serial ports or one 
parallel port. 

Billings 

The $47 00 Billings 500-series is another new entry from the 
Billing Computer Corp. This all-in-one system is also equipped 
with an eight-bit Z80 CPU, Mass storage is via either 5 'A- inch 





$4500-$6000 



minifloppy disks or eight-inch floppies. The minifloppies arc 
quad-density and are capable of up to 360K of storage per drive. 
Standard RAM for this system is 64K and it is capable of cither 
acting as a stand-alone computer or part of a computer network. 

This is a user- friendly system that practices what is called by 
the company "Computamatics." Under this system, a scries of 
English language prompts and menus, combined with function 
keys, will guide the user through the system's operation. 

Those 1 6 function-keys are included on the detachable 94-key 
keyboard that also includes a numeric keypad. The system 
interfaces with peripherals via either serial or parallel ports. 

CMC International 

CMC International Corp, 's SuperFive is, in reality, based on 
Intertcc Data Systems" SuperBrain series mentioned previously. 
In fact, it is the equivalent of the SuperBrain Sr. , which includes 
a single, quad-density 5 '/j-inch minifloppy for mass storage and 
a 5'/i-inch mini-Winchester hard drive for another 5 megabytes 
of storage. This comes standard in CMC's SuperFive I. 

Quasar Data Products 

Micromainframes systems still abound in this category realm 
with the S4695 Quasar Data Products QDP-iOO. This Z80- 
driven, 4-MHz system supports CP/M (multi-user) and will 
support the Oasis operating system (multi-user, multi-tasking). 
The standard RAM for this system is 64K of bank -selectable 
RAM. This is included on a board with a second clock speed of 5 
MHz. 

Since this is the heart of an expandable system, there are two 
serial and two parallel ports to interface with such user options as 
the CRT or printer. Storage is via dual quad-density, 5'A-inch 
minifloppy disks. 

Altos Computers 

One Altos ACS 8000-2 makes its debut in this category. 
Although it is still a micromainframe system — -a standalone 
system box with the user supplying accessory expansion cards 
and other peripherals such as CRT's and printer;; — when con- 
figured with the Altos 1 smart terminal, the cost of this system is 
$4645. In this configuration, the user has a full-featured, very 
powerful system. 

Driven by an eight-bit Z80 CPU. this system recognizes the 
industry-standard CP/M operating system. Its standard RAM of 
64K is capable of supporting not only that operating system, but 
also the languages this system is capable of running — 
FORTRAN-80, COBOL. PASCAL, APL, and PL/ 1 . Those are 
high-level systems-oriented programming languages and dis- 
play the power of this system. 

This system is capable oi I megabyte of storage via a pair of 
single-sided, double-density integral floppy disks and it in- 
terfaces with its peripherals via cither a pair of fully im- 
plemented. RS-232C serial ports or one programmable eight-bit 
port. 

The keyboard of the smart terminal linked to this system is a 



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TABLE 10— $4500- + 
Manufacturer 


Model 


Price 


CPU 


Word 
Length 


Disk 

Operating 

System(s) 


Language(sl 




Altos 
Computers 

2360 Bering Dr. 
San Jose. CA 95131 


ACS 
8000-2 


S4645 


Z80 


8 bits 


CP'M 


FORTRAN-80, APL, 
COBOL, Pascal, 
PL 1, other CP'M 
compatible 


Billings Comp. 
Corp. 

18600 E. 37th 
Independence, MO 
64057 


Biflings 
500 


$4700 


Z80 


8 bits 


proprietary 


NA 


Canon USA CX-1 

One Canon Plaza 

Lake Success, NY 11042 


£4995 


6609 


8 bits 


proprietary 


BASIC, assembler 
COBOL 




Hewlett-Packard 
1820 Embaradero Rd, 
Palo Alto, CA 94303 


HP-87 


$5190 


Z80 


8 bits 


proprietary. CP M 


BASIC, 

CP-'M compatible 


IBM 

PO Box 1328 

Boca Raton, FL 

33432 


IBM 

Personal 
Computer 


$5196 


6088 


bits 


DOS 1.1. CPM 
{optional} 


BASIC, other 
CP/M compatible 




Imsai Computer 

Div. Flscher- 
F re it as Corp. 
910 81st Ave. 
Oakland, CA 94621 


PCS-4410 


$5250 


8085 


8 bits 


IMDOS, 
CP/M 


BASIC, other 
CP/M compatible 


IMS Internat'l 
2800 Lockheed Way 
Carson City, NV 79701 


50O0SX 


$5170 


Z80A 


8 bits 


CP/M, MP/M. 
TurboDOS 




MA COM OSI 

7 Oak Pk 
Bedford. MA 01730 


230C 


$4890 


6502 


8 bits 


OS-65 


NA 


Micro Computer 
Technology 

3304 W. MacArthur Blvd 
Santa Ana, CA 
92704 


Model III 


$5399 


Z80 


8 bits 


LDOS, DOS, TRDOS. 
NEWDOS 80 






MicroSource 
395 N. Clayton Rd. 
New Lebanon, 
OH 45345 


M60QOP 


$4795 


Z80 


8 bits 


CP'M 


BASIC, UNIX 




MicroTechnology 
Box 12106 
Raleigh. NC 
27605 


MTU-13Q-2D 


$4598 


6501 


8 bits 


CODOS 


BASIC, UCSD 
Pascal 




NEC Home Elec. 
1401 W. Estes Ave. 
Oak Grove, IL 60007 


PC-8001 


$4814 


uPD 780 c-1 
(Z80-like) 


8 bits 


proprietary 


BASIC. COBOL, 
FORTRAN, Pascal 


Olivetti 

155 White Plains fld. 

Tarrytown, NY 

10591 


M-20 


$5489 


Z80O1 


16 
bits 


PCOS 


BASIC 



Radio Shack TRS-80 

One Tandy Center Model 

Fort Worth, TX 16 
76102 



$5798 



MC68000 



16/ proprietary/ 

8 bits TRSDOS 



Smoke Signal 
Broadcasting 

31336 Via Colinas 
Westlake Village, CA 
91362 



Chieftain 
9524 



S5229 



6809 




8 bits 




Systems Group 

1 601 W. Orangewood 
Orange, CA 
92668 


System 2814 


$5609 


Z80 


8 bits 


CPM, 
Oasis 


MPM. 




Vector Graphic 

500 N. Ventu Pk. Rd. 
Thousand Oaks, CA 
91320 


Vector 
2600 


$5195 


Z80 


8 bits 


CP/M 




BASIC, FORTRAN, 
COBOL, Pascal, 
OlherCP M 
compatible 


Xerox 

1341 Mockingbird La. 

Dallas, TX 75247 


820II 


$4895 


Z80 


8 bits 


CPM 




CBASIC. MBASIC, 
COBOL, other CP/M 
compatible 


Zenith Data 

Systems 

100 Milwaukee Ave. 

Glenview, IL 60025 


Z-89 


$4890 


Z80 


8 bits 


HDOS 


. CPM 


BASIC. FORTRAN, 
COBOL. UCSD p- 
Pascal, CP'M 
compatible 


Zenith Data 
Systems 


Z-100 


under 
$5000 


8088 


16 
bits 


MS-DOS, CP'M-86 


BASIC 



108 



Memory/Storage 



Expansion 



Keyboard 



I/O 



Display^ 



Comments 



64K<dual 8-inch 
disks-1MB 






1 05 keys, 

8* special function 



serial, 
parallel 



80 x 24 



12-inch 
green display 



64K/dual SVi-inch 
floppy disks 



serial, 

parallel 



80 x 24 



green 
display 



64K/dual 5%-inch 
floppy disks 



standard, serial, 80 x 24 text, 

numeric keypad parallel 32 grpahic symbols 



112K'dual5 1 /i-inch 
floppy disks 



ZSOcard 
added 



256K/dual S 1 /.-inch 
floppy disks 



other 

features 

unchanged 



64K'5V*-lnch 
floppy disk. 10 MB 
hard disk 



see PCS-42 






64K'dual S'/i-tnch 
floppy disks 






48K'dual 8-inch 
floppy disks 






serial 






48K/5V*-fnch 
floppy disks, 
5.7 MB hard 
disk 








64 (32) >: 16 




64K/dii 

(loppy disk, 5 MB 

hard disk 




standard 


serial 


80 x 24 


9-inch green display 


80K/dual 8-inch 
floppy disks 


MC68000 . 
adds 256K RAM 


96 keys, 

8 programmable 


2 serial, 
1 parallel 


80 x 24 


1 2-inch 
green display 


a; 'dual S'/i-inch 
floppy disks 




84 keys 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x 24 text, 

160 x 100 graphics 


1 2-inch color 
display 



128K/dual 8-inch 
floppy disks 



64K/dual 5Vi-inch 
floppy disks 



64K'dual-quad- 
density floppy 
disks 



64K/ 

dual 5Vi-Inch 

floppy disks 



64Kdual 8-Inch 
floppy disks 



quad- 



72 keys 



serial, 
parallel 



512 x 256 
graphics 



12-inch 
color 

display 



76 key keypad. 
special-function 
keys 



serial, 
parallel 



80 (40) x 24 



12-Inch 
green display 



micro- 
mainframe 



4 serial, 
2 parallel 



72 keys, 

1 key keypad 



3 serial, 
1 



80 x 24 



1 2-inch 
display 



96 keys 



2 serial 
2 parallel 



80 x 24 



12-inch 
display 



84 keys, 

1 2 key keypad 



3 serial, 
1 parallel 



80 x 24 



integral 
display 











O 

00 

m 


108K/dual 5V'4-inch 
floppy disks 


1 08 keys, 1 3 
special function, 
1 2- key keypad 


serial, 
parallel 


80 x 24 text, 

640 x 500 color graphics 


1 


109 
















105-key unii 



ion-keys. The disp 



10 

o 

z 
O 



O 

a 
110 



green phosphor CRT capable of generating the industry- 
standard 80 x 24 display. 

Systems Group 

[ 'wo computer systems similar to the Altos system are offered 
by the Systems Group, the $3035 System 2812 and the 55,609 
System 2814. Both computers contain an eight-bit Z80 CPU that 
is driven by a 4-MHz clock signal and both computers are 
capable of operating under CP/M, MP M and Oasis. Two 
single-sided, double-density or double-sided, double-density 
disks provide up to 1 .2 megabytes of mass storage, This system 
interfaces with peripherals via either parallel or serial ports. In 
Mich a system, the user provides the optional peripherals, 

Imsai 

The same is true of the Imsai series available at this price 
level. These computers are micromainframes driven bv 2-MH/ 
eight-bit 8080 CPU's, the S4850 PCS-4450. the 55 250 PCS- 
4410 and the 55750 PCS-44IS, provide system upgrades over 
the basic Imsai systems. The key upgrades for the 4450 is the 
addition of a 5-megabyte 5'/i-inch Winchester hard disk, while 
the 4410 upgrades with a 10-megabytC Winchester hard disk. 
The 44 18 has a 5VJ-inch. 18-megabyte Winchester drive. 

MA Com OSI 

Another micromainframe system that also appears in this 
price category is the MA Com-OSI 230C/0. Driven by a I 
MHz, eight-bit 6502 CPU. this $4890 micromainframe compu- 
ter is also the heart of a system. In the system box is48K of RAM 
and dual, single-density eight-inch floppy disks that arc capable 
of 275 K of storage. The operating system is the company's 
proprietary OS-65. 

Radio-Shack 

In this price category appears Radio-Shack with its Model 16. 
the most powerful computer Radio-Shack has ever introduced. 
This is another of the combination 1678-bil systems thai have 
recently come onto the market. And. it seems that each one has a 
different 16-bit CPU and a different eight-bit CPU. 

Making early use of the 16-bit MC68000 CPU, Radio- 
Shack's Model 16. also uses an eight-bit Z8f). Both are high- 
speed processors w ith the 68000 running at 6 MHz and the Z80 
running at 4 MHz. 

As in other systems, the 8-bit processor — the Z80 — handles 
ihe "housekeeping" for the 16-bit CPU. These chores include 
I/O and this design permits the Model 16 to use much more 
money and to process data at much higher speeds than other 
eight-hit micros on the market. 

This system comes with I28K of siandard RAM that can be 
expanded in 1 2XK increments to 5I2K, and it is software com- 
patible with the existing Model II system. This is especially 
important for the Radio Shack Model II owner who may be 
upgrading his system to the Model 16 and may have a sizeable 
investment in a Model II software library. 

Along with being software compatible with the Model II. the 
Model 16 operating system includes an editor assembler soft- 
ware package for assembly language program development. 
The editor allows extensive and sophisticated editing techniques 
and it is both line and character-oriented. The editor assembler 
package is supplied on the system disk and includes and editor, 
micro-assembler, linking loader, cross- re fere nee and bebuggcr. 

The keyboard is a 76-key professional unit and includ 
numeric keypad. The display is a 12-inch standard green CRT 
that is capable of the industry standard 80 X 24 or double-sized 
40 x 24 lines. Mass storage is available on one or two built-in 
quad-density eight-inch (loppy disks. In the one-disk version 
with 1,2 megabytes of mass sioi age. the price i> $4999 and in the 
two-disk version, the price is $5798. Tins system will interface 
with peripherals via a standard parallel port or two serial RS- 
232C ports. 



Other systems 

Into this price category also fall many other systems that reach 
their fully configured state. For instance, the Heath-Zenith 
Z-89's price climbs to S4890 when it is equipped with dual 
double-density H-inch drives. It still retains its 48K of internal 
RAM. However, when this system upgrades to 64K and be- 
comes theZ-90. the price increases to S5190. (A full description 
of this system was given earlier.) 

When two H-inch disks are added to the Xerox 820 II. the 
system's price rises to S4895. while when a 5-megabyu 
inch Winchester disk drive is added to the Mien ".Source 
M6000P, the price rises to $4795. (Please refer to previous 
description of these systems.) 

Olivetti's M-20. the first system to make use of the 16-bit 
Z800 1 CPU . also reaches its nearly fully 55480 configured state 
with the expansion of system RAM from I2KK to 160K. And. u 
is even further expandable. This system includes dual quad- 
density 5'A-inch mini floppy disks lor mass storage. (Please refer 
to the previous description of the basic system.) 

The S4598 MicroTechnologx MTU-130-2D is the fully con- 
figured system with the addition of 256K of RAM and an N-.MI1/ 
MC68000. 16-bit processor board. This gives this I -MHz. 6502 
system 16/8-bit capability. However, it should be noted the 
6K000 must interface with the relatively slow d5D2. so pn 
ing time may be slowed. 

Even Digital Equipment Corp. has a system upgrade in this 
price spectrum, the Professional 350. This is an upgrade of the 
325 and adds an internal 5Vi-inch Winchester hard disk drive as 
well as improved graphics. 

In its fully configured state, the Commodore CUM 8032, with 
dual disk drive and a dot matrix printer costs $51140. as does the 
CUM SuperPet SP900D m the same configuration. 

And even the Texas Instruments 77-90 4A tops out at a price 
of $5074 with two disk drives. 48K of RAM. a printer and both 
communications, voice and high-level video output. (Please 
refer to the earlier descriptions ol these systems.) 

These aren't all the systems available for under $6000. our 
cutoff point. For instance. A.B. Dick 'sMagnawriter is listed at 
$5995 and it is driven by an eight-bit 8085 CPU. Then there's 
Alpha Microsystem's personal, also driven h\ an MC68000 
16-bit processor. 

The Archives Inc. "s Model I . driven b\ an eight-bit Z80A, is 
priced at $5500. while the California Computer Systems' Sys- 
tem 300-3 — with terminal — costs $5450. Ihe 964 Plus by 
Columbia Data is also driven bj a Z80A eight-bit CPU and 
includes dual S'-.-inch minifloppy disk storage at S4995 The 
Corvus' Concept — one of the few MC68000 driven systems that 
has 512K of RAM dm\ 2.4 megabytes >^' mass storage on 
quad-density eight-inch disks is bargain priced at$5lXM). This is 
also one of the most powerful personal systems to date on the 
market. 

The Dynabyte model 5305 — another micromainframe — is 
priced at $5690 with two eight-inch double-density floppy disk 
drives. The Fortune Systems' 32116. MC68000 16-bit CPU 
system, is priced at S5995. 

In its maximum configuration, the IBM Personal Computer. 
is priced at $5 196. This price includes maximum RAM expan- 
sion to 256K and dual double-densitj mini floppies. 

Another system which reaches full power in this price range is 
the 55170 IMS International 5000SX with terminal. Another of 
the Z80A-driven systems, this one includes dual 5 1 ■ inch 
miiuiloppies and 64K of RAM 

Micro Computer Technology Inc. lakes the Radio Shack 
Model III and increases the mass storage capacity b\ st 
orders of magnitude. For $5399* ., buyer gets the 4SK Model in 
anda5 , /-i-ineh Winchester hard disk which yields 5.7 megabytes 
iii storage. This is combined with a quad-densitj S . inch minif- 
loppy. 

In its maximum configuration, the NEC PC800I reaches a 
powerful level. For $4814. the user gets I60K of RAM. ?2(iK ol 
storage on dual, double-density 5 ' 4-inch minifloppies and the 
high-resolution color monitor R-E 



8-bits 



ft. 



JOSEF BERNARD 

TECHNICAL EDITOR 



YOU'VE CERTAINLY READ OR HEARIi Of- x-m I' OK I ft- 11 1 I IOMPUT- 

ers, but what exactly do the terms mean'? Let's start at the 
beginning 

A hit, if you're not already familiar with its definition, stands 
for a Binary digit, the presence or absence of an electrical signal 
within a logic or computer circuit, and represents a "yes" or 
"no," "on" or "off," "logic- 1" or "logic-O" condition. By 
itself, a bit can convey little information — it's either there or it 
isn't. Collections of bits, however, with the bits lined up"sidc- 
by-side." can do a lot more. 

Two bits, in their various on/off combinations, can represent 
four numbers: zero, one, two or three. Add another bit. and you 
have eight different combinations available to give you the 
numbers zero through seven. Eight bits will give you 256 
possible combinations: sixteen bi'.i, 65.536 combinations. 

Since each bit can represent only one of two values — zero or 
one — we arc restricted to working with the numbers that can be 
built using powers of two. That's where the word "binary" 
comes in — it refers to the two states that a bit can be in. If we 
liked, wc could consider each bit to have a value of either /em or 
two, and add them together in longer and longer strings to gel the 
values we needed. It makes a lot more sense, though, to allow 
each bit-position to represent a power of two (sec Fig. 1 ). Thus, 
the first bit-position represents either zero or 2", or I. The 
second position would be 2 1 . or2 (for now we'll ignore the cases 
where no bit is present — that's always zero). 




f 


2 6 


2* 


2« 


?3 


2 2 


2' 


2° 


• 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


' 


128 


64 


32 


IB 


g 


•1 


2 


1 



' 



FIG. 1— LOGIC-HIGH BITS are traditionally represented by "1"s; logic- 
lows by "0"s. Binary numbers are read from right to left: the digit with the 
lowest value is at the right. 

The third bit would represent 2 : , or 4. and the fourth 2 '. or 8, 
If we had a 4-bit number where all the bits were "high" 
(present), that number would be equal to 15. the sum of 2" + 2 1 
+ 2 : + 2\ Of course, not all the bits have to be high. If bit-2 
were "low" (equal to "zero"), the sum of the binary digits 
would be 13, and so on. 

In computers, and other logic circuits, a "high" bit is usually 
represented by an electrical value of close to five volts; a "low" 
bit is close to zero volts. A microprocessor is set up to look For a 
specific number of bits. An eight-bit microprocessor will have 
eight lines available for binary data. It will always look for eight 
bits, arranged side-by-side. If some of those bits are zeroes, ii 
will take (hat into account and count only the "high" ones but, 
nonetheless, ii will still have to account for all eight bits. A 
si\teen-bit microprocessor will always look for a string of six- 
teen bits. 



8bitsvs.16 bits 



16-bit: 



The latest upheaval in 

the microcomputer revolution 

is the introduction of 16-bit computers. 

What makes them different, 

and are they for you? 



The important thing to remember is that a microprocessor is 
always looking out of a window that's so-inany-biis wide: an 
eight-bit microprocessor will always look for the combined 
value of eight bits at once — whether they're high or low — and a 
sixteen-bit one will do the same for a sixteen-bit word (a word is 
a binary number made up of a fixed number of bits — that's why 
we speak of eight- or sixteen-bil-word systems). 

To finish up this discussion of terminology, a 4-bil word is 
called a nybble, an 8-bit word a byie. and a 16-bit word is., .well 
...a 16-btt. or double-byte, word. 

Microprocessors and word-lengths 

The first microprocessors, like the 4004, 4040. and SOMP 
were 4-bit devices— not really useful for practical computing. In 
fact, they were originally designed for use in programmable 
calculators... but for various reasons that plan was never com- 
pleted. Some simple computers were built using them, but they 
found their greatest use in microprocessor-controlled appliances 
and in other applications that could benefit from a microp- 
rocessor, but that required only a limited amount of "smarts." 

The 4-bil devices were quickly followed by much more soph- 
isticated 8-bit microprocessors such as the 8008 and 8080 (used 
in such computers as the Affair and Imsai) and the 6800. which 
was adopted by SWTP (South (vest Technical Products) and 
Midwest Scientific, among others. A second generation of 8-bit 
devices followed close on their heels; included in that group 
were the 6502. used in the Apple 11 and many Commodore 
computers, and the Z80. used by — to name only one of many — 
Radio Shack's TRS-80. 

Among the most popular microprocessors were the 8080 and 
the Z80, and a powerful disk operating -system, CP/M. which 
was developed to run on systems using those microprocessors, 
gained popularity. (It is compatible with both microprocessors 
because the Z80 "understands" all the instructions used by the 
8080. The same holds for the 8085. an enhanced version of the 
8080.) 

For a long time — as microcomputer history goes — those 8-bit 



O 

o 

-H 

o 

CD 

m 

3) 

to 
oo 
rsj 



111 






microprocessors dominated the market. There were a couple of 
16-bit CPU's (Central Processing Units — another term for 
"microprocessor") around — Texas Instruments' TMS99(X)and 
Western Digital's WD 16 — but they found limited use because 
most microcomputers were set up to handle only 8-bit devices. 
Then, in 1978. announcements were made of a number of 
new 16-hit microprocessors — the 68000 from Motorola, the 
Z8000 from Zilog and the 8086 (and later the 8088) from Intel- 
Potential microcomputer owners began asking themselves 
whether they shouldn't wait until computers using ihem became 
available: after all. they would be much more powerful. 

8-bit computers 

As we mentioned earlier, computers using 8-bit micro- 
processors turned out to dominate the market. The main reason 
for that was that, as the microcomputer market was exploding, 
the most powerful CPU's were the 8-bit units — 16-bittcrs were 
still on the drawing board or in the testing stage. 

Consequently, languages, operating systems, and programs 
all were written using H-bit words. A tremendous library ol'8-hii 
material grew up and, as time went on. the 8-bit languages and 
programs became more and more sophisticated ( a term frequent- 
ly used in "computerese" to mean '■complex and versatile"), 
and there arose a number of extremely useful programs (and 
even more next-to-useless ones). 

There arc programs written for 8-bit computers that will do 
almost anything you need yourcomputcr to help you with. (This 
article was written on an 8-bit computer running a word- 
processing program). Some programs are more efficient than 
others, but that is due mainly to the skills the programmer 
applied to his work and, perhaps, to the languages in which they 
were written. 

If 8-bit software (programs) and hardware (computers) are 
capable of so much. then, why then do vvc need 16-bit 
machines? 

8 bits vs. 16 bits 

Mainframe computers — the big ones — use word lengths of 16 
bits, 32 bits, or greater and. we must admit, are more powerful 
than our 8-bit micros. What makes them more powerful'? There 
arc several factors. 

"flic first is that while an 8-bit microprocessor can recognize a 
maximum of 256 different instructions (they're never all used — 
the Z80. which probably has the most comprehensive 
instruction-set. uses only 158). a 16-bit CPU can recognize over 
65,000 instructions (also not all used). Many of the instructions 
for 8-bit computers, though, require several 8-bit words, one 
after the other. That requires the computer to go through several 
cycles to perform a single operation. 

In a 16-bil machine, multiple-byte instructions can be pre- 
sented to the computer all at once, which means that several 
time-consuming (even when you're working in microseconds — 
millionths of a second — time continues to fly) instructions can 
be swallowed all in one gulp, and the computing process 
speeded up considerably. 

At the other end of the microprocessor, where data is trans- 
ferred to and from memory, again, a longer word length makes 
for more efficiency. Possibly even more important is the fact 
that, while H-bit processors can directly address 65,536 memory 
locations, 16-bit processors can directly address millions of 
memory locations 
That means that, as programs become more complex, and 
w require more storage space for themselves and for the data they 
o process, a computer using a longer word-length can operate 
§ more quickly. There's the real reason for interest in 16-bit 
cc computers — speed! 
p To take advantage of the best of both worlds, a number of 




j recent computers contain both 8-bit and 16-bit microprocessors 
£ (sec Fig. 2). That generally means that they can run both "old" 
5 (but valuable) programs written for 8-bit computers as well as 



FIG. 2— A DUAL-PROCESSOR board, such as this one from CompuPro, 
allows the use of both B-bit and 16-bit software. 

Do you need sixteen bits? 

We always like to think that more or faster is hetter. The 
Concorde will get us to London in less than half the lime thai it 
would take on a 747. But is there any reason for most of us to pay 
the price to save those extra few hours.' 

Similarly, eight bits are better than four and sixteen bits are 
better than eight. But is that really the case? My 8-bit computer 
can manipulate the words I am setting down more rapidly that I 
can think of them or enter them from my keyboard. Do I need a 
computer that will work still faster, even though I can't? The 
answer is an obvious "no." 

I don't even need a faster computer to run an action-game 
program if my reflexes arc slower than the computer's. What 
good. then, is a faster computer? The I'irst modern computers — 
vintage World War 2 — were created to calculate the the 
trajectories of artillery fire. Obviously, ihe faster and more 
accurately those could be determined, the hetter the results. 

The performance of difficult and complex calculations, like 
those just mentioned, or even of simple but repetitive ones, is 
called number crunching. And number crunching is not res- 
tricted to just military applications. 

For example, there are programs for home or commercial UaC 
that require the solving of complex equations or the performance 
of the same type of calculations over and over (like calculating 
payroll deductions). Obviously, the faster the computer can 
perform the task, the more work it can do in a given time — and 
the sooner the results will be obtained, While that ma\ not have a 
great impact on your personal life, in business, time is money 
Also, very large numbers can be handled more easily and 
accurately by a 1 6-bit machine than by an 8-bit one because of 
the longer word-size. 

Furthermore, since computers are frequently used to store and 
rearrange other types of data than numbers— mailing lists, for 
example — the speed and efficiency that the 1 6-bit computers 
provide make it possible for those lists to be searched through 
and sorted faster. 

(Consider the addition of just one name to a mailing list. 
When it's added, everything else on the list has to be moved to 
make room for it, and, possibly — if the program requires it — 
rearranged. A 16-bit computer will perform a task such as that 
much more rapidly than an 8-bit one.) 

High-resolution computer graphics are more and more in 
demand, and the only way to generate them efficiently and 
quickly is through the use of computers using longer word- 
lengths and able to access more memory more rapidly. 

If your applications call for tasks where heavy number- 
crunching (including that which has to be performed in 
simulations — graphic and otherwise), complex data manipula- 
tion, or a very high degree of accuracy are required, a 16-bit 
computer could well be worth the investment. If. on the other 
hand, you will be using yourcomputcr for less complicated jobs, 
or if a few more seconds arc not a critical factor for you. then a 
good old, tried-and-true. 8-bitter is probably what you should be 
looking for. As long as your computer can keep up with your 
demands, there's no real need to look for a bitiaer one. R-E 



112 



Games and Leisure Time 




SOFTWARE 




Games and 
Leisure Time 



Once you've balanced 

your company's budget, 

completed your design 

project, and checked the late 

stock-market prices, it's time 

to give your computer—and 

yourself— a break. 

HERB FRIEDMAN 



WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY. JR.. THE SYNDICATED COLUMNIST. PUB- 

lisher, and TV personality, recently complained in his news- 
paper column that he had never read a good reason for owning a 
personal computer lor the home — other than for playing games. 

Actually, games are an important pan of personal computing. 
While I seriously doubt whether anyone ever spent several 
thousand dollars on a full-blown personal computer system just 
to play games, the ability to play games is inherent in all 
personal computers — so why not play them'.' There is nothing 
wrong with blasting a few Klingons after a three-hour stint 
building a VisiCalc or SuperCalc model of your company's 
financial situation for the next thousand years. And there's no 
reason why the programmer working on a computer design tor a 
perpetual-motion widget can't relax with a challenging game of 
computer chess, or by zapping another hundred Klingons. 

The truth is that personal -computer games are so popular that 
several manufacturers offer plug-in ROM (ficad Only Memory) 
game cartridges for iheir more-or-tess-conventional computers; 
that way. the engineer can switch from designing a missile 
defense-system to zapping space invaders with the flick of the 
wrist, and without waiting minutes or even just seconds for the 
game to load from tape or disk. 

Some game history 

The very first computer game [ came across was supplied vviih 
my Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I computer. It was a blackjack 
game written in BASIC, and typical of BASIC programs, it was 
s-l-o-w. The program was supplied on a cassette tape along with 
a computer version of backgammon. It took almost a minute to 
load, assuming the level from the recorder was correct; actually, 
it often took two or three tries to get a perfect load. 

The program would deal a hand by having the CRT screen 
s-I-o-w-l-y trace each card's rectangular outline on the screen, 
and then identify the card within the rectangle as "8 CLUBS," 
"'KING HEARTS." and so on. Watching the computer play 
blackjack was a new and exciting experience — the first hundred 
times. Then the novelty wore off; after the initial thrill of getting 
the computer to "do something useful" I would get restless 
waiting for the display to create the cards — but that was a fault of 
BASIC, the language used to write the program. Graphics 
produced by interpreted BASIC'S are slow, and there's no way 



to get around the problem. (Compiled BASIC'S are a lot faster, 
but that's an entirely different subject.) 

For the first few years of personal -computer history, games 
weren't much better than blackjack. The "biggies" were end- 
less versions of nim, electronic dice, and a host of other math- 
based programs you could just as easily write or type in yourself 
as purchase in prerecorded form. In fact, most of the early game 
cassettes were nothing more than a collection of simple, math- 
oriented BASIC programs that high school kids used to run on 
their school's time-sharing computers. 

But things have changed. While simple games written in 
BASIC are still sold, persona! computers have available almost 
every conceivable type of game, including some rather good 
simulations of standard arcade games. 

There are auto races and galactic wars; baseball, football, 
basketball, and other sports — and more galactic wars; superb 
chess and checkers, and still more galactic wars; Par Man and 
its innumerable imitators, and still more galactic wars; endless 
versions of "Breakout," and maze-type games; and — the latest 
craze— the adventure games where the player must figure out a 
means to bypass the dragons, spacemen, soldiers, creatures, 
pits, poisons, and passions, in order to: a) find the treasure, b) 
find the girl, c) just plain escape, d) do anything else he can 
possibly imagine. 

A variety of games 

There are "intellectual" games where you can plan a new 
world, "brain-teaser" or "brain-buster" games, and even com- 
puter versions of Monopoly, including Monopoly-type games of 
the "Wall Street wheeler-dealer" sort (complete with robbing 
widows and orphans— just like real life); and of course, the very 
popular galactic- war games. 

While personal-computer versions of arcade games such as 
Pac Man and Gaiaxian arc the hottest things going in games, 
there are high-resolution arcade-type games using color that 
have been written specifically for personal computers, such as 
the Eliminator game for the Apple 11. Eliminator, which is 
typical of the latest personal-computer color arcade-type games, 
uses high-resolution graphics, and its characters and action arc 
as detailed as you're likely to get from the arcade games at your 
local video-game emporium. 



s 

m 

XI 



113 



01' course, noi all arcade-type games arc high resolution. 
Radio Shack's computers, in particular, simply don't have in- 
herent lit-rcs (high-resolution) capability, but they get along 
quite nicely with a littic less resolution by creating plenty of 
exciting graphics. In particular, the Chess software fortheCo/or 
Computer uses color lor added excitement, and the game itselt is 
rated by knowledgeable players to be superior in both action and 
presentation t» the chess games offered for use with the home 



videogame consoles. 

While we're on the subject of high-resolution graphics, the 
new versions of blackjack give you a good ideaol what you can 
expect from current software . A lew paragraphs back I referred 
to the rectangles in "ancient" software that represented playing 
cards with their values printed within them. Well, the new hi-rcs 
versions of blackjack actually duplicate the playing cards you 
might find in a realtime deck. ("Realtime" is computerese for 



TABLE 1— DIRECTORY OF INDEPENDENT GAME SOFTWARE SUPPLIERS 



Game software Is available from computer manufacturers, and in addition, from many 
independent suppliers, such as the ones listed below. 



AARDVARK SOFTWARE, INC. 
783 N. Water Street 
Milwaukee, Wl 53202 

ACCENT SOFTWARE 
3750 Wright Blvd. 
Palo Alto, CA 94306 

ACORN SOFTWARE PRODUCTS 

634 N, Carolina Ave. S.E. 
I Washington, DC 20003 

ADVENTURE, INTERNATIONAL 
507 East Street 
Box 3435 
Longwood, FL 32750 

ALPHA PRODUCTS 
79-04 Jamaica Ave, 
Woodhaven. NY 11421 

ALPHA QUEUE SYSTEMS 
PO Box 20885 
Dallas, TX 75220 

ALTERNATE WORLD SIMULATIONS 
PO Box 941 
Milpitas, CA 95035 

AMBER SOFTWARE 
170 Parsippany Rd. 
Parsippany, NY 07054 

ARCADE PLUS 
5276 Hollister Ave. 
Santa Barbara, CA 931 1 1 

ARTWORX SOFTWARE CO. 

150 N. Main Street 
Fairport. NY 14450 

ATKIN RESOURCES 
1 693 Merribee Way 
Salt Lake City. UT 84121 

AUTOMATED SIMULATIONS 

1988 Leghorn 

PO Box 4247 

Mountain View, CA 94043 



BARGAINBYTE 
PO Box 23195 
Harahan, LA 70183 

BASICS AND BEYOND, INC. 
Box 10 

Amawalk, NY 10501 

BERUNERSOFT 
102 Jericho Turnpike 
New Hyde Park, NY 1 1040 

BIG FIVE SOFTWARE 
14619 Victory Blvd. No. 1 
Van Nuys, CA 91411 

BRODERBUND SOFTWARE 
2 Vista Wood Way 
San Rafael, CA 94901 

BUDGECO 
428 Pala Ave. 
Piedmont. CA 9461 1 

BULLSEYE SOFTWARE 
PO Drawer 7900 
Incline Village, NV 89450 

BUSINESS AND PLEASURE SOFT- 
WARE 

601 1 San Felipe 
Houston, TX 77057 

BYTE-A-BIT COMPUTING CO. 
PO Box D 
Levittown, NY 11756 

CAVALIER COMPUTER 

PO Box 2032 

Del Mar, CA 92014 

CE SOFTWARE 

801 73rd St. 

Des Moines, IA 50312 

THE CODE WORKS 

PO Box 550 

Goleta, CA 93116 



COMPUTERWARE 
Box 668 

1512 Encinitas Blvd. 
Encinitas, CA 92024 

COMPUTRONICS 
50 N. Pascack Road 
Spring Valley, NY 10977 

COMTRONIC SYSTEMS 
PO Box 3325 
Kent, WA 98031 

CONTINENTAL ADVENTURES 

4975 Brookdale Street 
Bloomlield Hills, Ml 48013 

THE CORNSOFT GROUP 

6008 N, Keystone Ave. 
Indianapolis, IN 46220 

CREATIVE SOFTWARE 

201 San Antonio Circle No. 270 
Mountain View, CA 94040 

CRYSTAL COMPUTER 

17120 Monterey Road 
Morgan Hill, CA 95037 

CYBERTRONICS INTERNATIONAL 

999 Mt. Kemble Ave, 
Morristown, NJ 07960 

DAKIN5 CORPORATION 

PO Box 21187 
Denver, CO 80221 

DATAMOST 

9748 Cozycroft Ave. 
Chatsworth, CA 91311 

DYNACOMP 
1427 Monroe Ave. 
Rochester, NY 14618 

ECHELON 

6513 Lankershim Blvd., No. 2212 

N.Hollywood, CA 91606 

EDU-WARE SERVICES, INC. 
PO Box 22222 
Agoura, CA 91301 



en 
o 

z 
o 
a: 

H 

o 

UJ 



o 

Q 



AVALON HILL GAME COMPANY 
4517 Hartford Rd. 
-Baltimore, MD 21214 

AVANT-GARDE CREATIONS 
PO Box 30161 
Eugene, OR 97403 

BARCLAY BRIDGE, INC. 

8 Bush Ave. 

Port Chester, NY 10583 



COMPUGAMES 
1 9 Booth Street 
Enfield, CT 06082 

COMPUTER CONSULTING 
6723 E. 66th Place 
Tulsa, OK 74133 

COMPUTER LEARNING CONNECTION 

One Boston Place 
Boston, MA 02108 



EL COMP PUBLISHING 
53 Red rock Lane 
Pomona, CA 91 766 

EN-JOY COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

PO Box 1535 
Goleta, CA93116 

FANTASTIC SOFTWARE 

PO Box 27734 

Las Vegas, NV 89127 



114 



"the world as we know it." 


as opposed to "the world as ers. are often spec 


acular, with an almost artistic use of color (for 




represented by a computer program.'*) Within the rectangle on color computers). 


Many arc licensed versions of arcade games. 




the screen is a reasonable facsimile of actual cards: the queen of and, as such, have a certain air of quality ( and a price to match). 




diamonds will show the queen 


along with the diamond suite. On the other hand 


many of (he less expensive older games were 




The same goes for the king and jack: while the aee of spades originally written 


for mainframe (giant-size > computers and 




would really look like an ace 


of spades. This enhances the have been scaled down for personal computers. Main scaled- 




"payability" of the game. 


down games arc 


strictly second-rate by my standards; others 




The newer games, written specifically for personal coniput- might claim that i 


hey are prime junk. 




WILLIAM A. FINK 


MEGASOFT, INC. 


SENTINENT SOFTWARE 


POBox 5912 


31 East 31st Street 


PO Box 4929 




Lighthouse Point, FL 33074 


New York, NY 10016 


Aspen, CO 81612 




FUTUREVIEW 


MELBOURNE HOUSE SOFTWARE 


SIRUS SOFTWARE, INC. 




POBox 101 


6917 Valjean Ave. 


10364 Rockingham Drive 




Joplin, MO 64802 


Van Nuys, CA 91406 


Sacramento, CA 95827 




GEBELLI SOFTWARE, INC. 


MERRY BEE COMMUNICATIONS 


SIR-TECH SOFTWARE, INC. 




1791 Tribute Road No. E1 


81 5 Crest Dr. 


6 Main Street 




Sacramento, CA 95815 


Omaha, NE 68046 


Ogdensburg, NY 13669 




HAYDEN 


METPHORIC ASSOCIATES 


SOFT SECTOR MARKETING 




50 Essex Street 


PO Box 6346 


6250 Middlebelt 




Rochelle Park, NJ 07662 


Pittsburgh, PA 15212 


Garden City, Ml 48135 




HIGHLANDS COMPUTER 


MICROLAB 


THE SOFTWARE EXCHANGE 




14422 S.E. 132nd 


2310 Skokie Valley Road 


6 South Street 




Renton, WA 98055 


Highland Park, IL 60035 


Milford, NH 03055 




HORIZON SIMULATIONS 


MUSE SOFTWARE 


SOFTWARE TOOLWORKS 




7561 Crater Lake Highway 


347 N. Charles Street 


14478 Glorietta Drive 




White City, OR 97503 


Baltimore, MD 21201 


Sherman Oaks, CA 91423 




I.D.S.I. 


NELSON SOFTWARE SYSTEMS 


SPECTRAL ASSOCIATES 




POBox 1658 


POBox 19096 


141 Harvard Ave. 




Las Cruces, NM 88004 


Minneapolis, MN 55419 


Tacoma, WA 98466 




1MB 




SPECTRUM SOFTWARE 




PO Box 289 
Williamstown, MA 01267 


ON-LINE SYSTEMS 
36575 Mudge Ranch Road 
Coarsegold, CA 93614 


142 Carlow 
Sunnyvale, CA 94087 




INFOCOM INC 




STONEWARE MICROCOMPUTER 




6 Faneuil Hall Marketplace 
Boston, MA 02109 


ORION SOFTWARE 
147 Main St. 


PRODUCTS 

50 Belvedere Street 






Ossining, NY 10562 


San Rafael, CA 94901 




INSOFT 

10175 Barbar Blvd., Suite 202B 


PICCADILLY SOFTWARE 


STRATEGIC SIMULATIONS 




Portland, OR 97219 


89 Summit Ave. 
Summit, NJ 07901 


465 Fairchtld Drive 

Suite 108 

Mountain View, CA 94043 




INSTANT SOFTWARE 


POWERSOFT, INC. 






Peterborough, NH 03458 


POBox 157 


SUBLOGIC COMMUNICATIONS 






Pitman, NJ 08701 


71 3 Edgebrook Drive 




KBYTE 

1705 Austin 
Troy, Ml 48099 


QUALITY SOFTWARE 


Champaign, IL 61820 




6660 Reseda Blvd., No. 105 


SUPERIOR SOFTWARE, INC. 




Reseda, CA 91335 


POBox 11676 




KRELL SOFTWARE 


RAINBOW COMPUTING, INC. 


Kansas City, MO 64138 




21 Millbrook Dr. 
Stony Brook, NY 11 790 


9719 Reseda Blvd. 
Northridge, CA 91324 


SYNERGISTIC SOFTWARE 
5221 120th Ave. S.E. 
Bellevue, WA 98006 




MACROTRONICS, INC. 


RIVERBANK SOFTWARE INC. 






1124 N, Golden State Blvd. 


Smith's Landing Road 


VERSA COMPUTING, INC. 




Suite G 


PO Box 128 


3541 Old Conejo Road. Suite 104 




Turlock, CA 95308 


Denton, MD 21629 


Newbury Park, CA 91320 




M.A.C. SOFTWARE 


ROCKROY, INC. 


VILLAGE SOFTWARE 




PO Box 27 


7721 East Gray Road, Suite 103 


31220 La Baya Drive, Suite 110 




Chilticothe, OH 45601 


Scottsdaie, AZ 85260 


Westlake Village, CA 91362 




MARK DATA PRODUCTS 


ROGO COMPUTER PRODUCTS 


VOYAGER SOFTWARE 


o 
o 


23802 Barquilla 


4752 DeBeers Drive 


PO Box 15-518 


Mission Viejo. CA 92961 


El Paso, TX 79924 


San Francisco, CA 941 1 8 


H 
O 


MED SYSTEMS SOFTWARE 


ROKLAN CORP. 


ZETA SYSTEMS INC. 


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3) 


PO Box 2674 


10600 West Higgins Road 


1725 Adelaide Blvd. 




Chapel Hill, NC 27514 


Rosemont, IL 60018 


Akron, OH 44305 


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115 









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Game types 

The really successful games— in the sense that they will keep 
you interested — are those specifically written for personal com- 
puters, and not some scaled-down main frame software that 
someone wrote at a university umpty-ump years ago. The games 
come in two principal types: the "thinking" game and the 
"action" game. 

An example of a "thinking" game is one of the many var- 
iations on the "Star Trek" theme, where in order to fight the 
Klingons you must keep track of your ship's propulsion energy, 
its phasor (gun) encrgj , force >hicld energy, and — in some 
versions— even food for the crew . 

Speaking of food, in "Hammurabi" you're the ruler of an 
ancient kingdom that must ration grain to get the people through 
a period of drought. You have to decide how much grain to 
plant, how much in use as food. and. you have to control the rats 
thai can devour the grain you store. It's another excellent 
"thinking" program thai can keep your muut percolating. It\ 
prohably good training if you ever become the despotic ruler of 
some backward desert country. 

"Adventure" games also provide food for thought. An in- 
triguing variation on the "adventure" theme is Infocom's De- 
adline, the first of a series to be marketed under the Interlogic 
name, that asks you to solve a murder mystery. Naturally you 
have to ask questions and search for clues, hut in addition you 
receive a sealed folder with police reports, photographs, a 
coroner's report, etc. That information is an integral pan of the 
game, and you probably won't be able to find out "whodunnit" 
without it, 

Depending on the program, the "thinkers" may have exten- 
sive graphics, or no graphics at all Radio Shade's version oi 
"Star Trek." called Invasion Farce (Fig. i ) gives you a map of 
an area out in space, while The Software Toolworks' Airport, 
for the Heath Zenith computers, puts you in the position of an 
air-traffic controller, displays the airways and beacons on the 
screen, along with an ever- lengthening list of planes entering 
and leaving your airspace. 

The "action" games are primarily arcade-type games, where 
you must blast a scries of space invaders, monsters, or planets 
from the screen; race a car (or box) across a screen filled with 
two-way traffic; demolish a wall of bricks, boxes, or whatever; 
defend a city (another galactic war}, or do just about anything 
that will produce exploding colors and great sound effects. In 
action games almost anything goes. If a Pac Man cats "energy 
dots." a "Scarfman" will "scarf" energy food. (Docs that 
sound familiar?) 

What to look for 

One of the problems in selecting games is the "comic hook" 
hype for the new action games. If you're old enough, you may 
remember the combat-oriented men's action magazines from the 
1950's and early sixties. Their covers leatured "boiler plate" 
(every rivet showing) drawings of diving planes with machine 
guns and cannons blazing, destroyers under kamikaze attack 
with 40-mm ack-ack cannon blazing trails in the sky. and 
marines storming some Pacific Ocean rock with flames spouting 
from (he muzzles of their guns. Well, the same type of artwork is 
now used to sell personal-computer action software. 

But. while the illustrations in the old magazines had some 
relation to real comhat. you are simply not going to see that kind 
of stuff on your screen. Oh. there will be cute little shapes that 
you can accept as basketball players dribbling down the court, 
and other funny looking shapes that will charge the line in 
football, but don't expect a reasonable facsimili ol Darth Vad- 
er's Death Star on the computer's screen — the screen can't 
duplicate the advertising artwork — vet' 

Another thing the programs can't duplicate arc the scantily 
clad girls who look like Raqucl Welch in the movie One Million 
B.C. Oh yes. on the software packaging there's our girl in a 
patch of fur from some intergalactic monster, and our muscular 
hero is dressed in a slightly larger piece of the same monster's 



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INVASION FORCE is Radio Shack's version of Star Trek. This is an ex- 
ample of a thinking game rather than an "action" game. Notice the com- 
plexity of the screen display and the number of factors you must keep 
track of to kill the invading Kllngon force. 

fur, but that's about as far as it goes. You may never even see the 
characters on your computer screen, and if you do, they'll just be 
peculiar little shapes. 

Buying games 

While quite a few computer games are sold by mail order, a 
surprising number are sold through local computer stores , There 
are several reasons for that, and you should consider them when 
adding to your games-software collection. 

First off, unless you are already familiar with a game, you arc 
buying a pig in a poke (whatever that means). The magazine ad 
showing some cute girl drapped over Mr, Musdehound's shoul- 
der doesn't insure a fun program. If you know the program — 
say , your friend has a version for his computer— and you like it. 
then you know what you're getting. But, if you know nothing 
about the software, it may turn out that the drawing is the best 
thing going for it. 

Next, a good computer store offers you the opportunity to try 
out an assortment of games before making the decision to buy. 
Many of the really good game-software houses don't advertise: 
they simply send their entire production to local stores. 1 once 
watched seven people try Eliminator (a "shoot-'em-out-of-thc- 
skies" game) on an Apple II during a one-hour session and every 
one of them purchased a copy at S30 apiece. 1 also saw the same 
people reject several other game programs as "too simple," or 
"not having enough action." or "too repetitive." You really 
should try before you buy, especially when software starts to 
cost more than a night on the town for two, 

Finally, a few words about computer manufacturers' own 
software. Game software is available on cassette tapes, on disks, 
and in plug-in R( )M modules. All low-cost computers can 
accommodate game software supplied on cassette tape. If the 
computer is also equipped with a disk s\ stem, disk- based games 
can also be used, though much disk-type software is initially 
supplied on cassette, with the changeover to disk made by the 
user Some of the low-cost computers such as the VIC 20, Radio 
Shack's Color Computer, and the Atari's have a socket for game 
software available on plug-in ROM cartridges. Frequently, the 
plug-in modules are licensed versions of games specifically 
modified for a particular computer. Virtually all of the low-cost 
personal computers announced for future production also pro- 
\ tde a special socket for the plug-in ROM module 

Though most of the plug-in module software is presently 
supplied by the computer manufacturer, a broad aftcrmarket is 
fasi developing for computers such as the VIC 20 and the 
Atari's, which are often sold through appliance stores. It really 
make-* no difference who supplies the soli ware as long as you 
enjoy it. R-E 



116 



SWD-1 VIDEO CONVERTER 



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FOR CABLE TV | 

i SWD-1 Video Conv*ft*r it Uti- 
t Hzed on tabic TV systems CO re- 
b .nova the KHz"s signal from a I 
distorted video (channel 3 in/ 
out) and alio pa" thru the 
(inimal undistortad/detocted 
audio signai Rocker switch 
se'ecu operating mode to remove *.Hz s 
n Inrjm the vi deo or peas ell ol hoi cha n- 
nals normally. Simple to asaomblc — toss Chen 30 
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75 ohms r 1 1 7VAC- 

SWD-1 Video Convener Kit, . $69.95 I 



VTR ACCESSORIES 



SIMPLE SIMON VIDEO STABILIZER 

Simple Simon Video Stabilizer. 
Model VS-125, eliminate! Che •-■€<■- 
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vidso tapes when playing through 
Ijryc SCreen prOpJCtOrS Qr on an- 
other VTR. Simple to us a. |US( ad|ust 
the lock cont'd for a stable pietura. Once the control is sol. the tape 
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1 2 V power supply, 

VS-1 25 Video StabiJizgr, wired $54.35 

SIMPLE SIMON VIDEO SWITCHING BOX 

The Affordable Video 
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Excellent in lactation and no Idsi 
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300 Video Switching Box enables 
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VSB-30Q Video Switching Bo* r wired S19.95 



UHF ANTENNAS and ACCESSORIES 



MDS-AMATEUR-ETV 32 ELEMENT 



• Not * HI 
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MAF.-2 32 Element YAGI Antenna SZ3.95 

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Designed In; Simple Sanon by former Japanese CQ Amaieur Magazine's UHF 
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IC and capacitors prc-5EidE:«] 
Model K50C-KIT 1.9 - 2.5GN: Down Converter Kit $34.95 

Ksto Sons' Regulated Varible DC Power Supply 

Fn use with KSD.C-KIT 19 - 2.5GHz Gown Converter Completely assembled 
with Alliactwe Cahnel, TV/Conyerter Mode Switch, Frequency Control and 
LED indicator 
Model KSPS-1A Assembled Power Supply $23.95 





SPECIAL 

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ORDER ALL THREE ITEMS 

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Revolutionary Ntw HYBRID IC Broadband Ampllliers 
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Our New STVA 14 5dB GAIN, 14 ELEMENT 
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makes switching, of your VCR/VTR, 
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easy as pushing buttons. 



its Bambi Electronic Video Switch 15 ill 
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directing the input* 10 anv Of all of the ihree outputs 

Now vou can eliminate , f . the drudgery of disconnecting ond 
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Chaok. the quality of Bambi against that of 

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Bambi' a Specifications: 

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• Power Raq. 1 17VAC 60 Hi. 2W 

• OiminiiDnt ' 0!^ w > ^i D n 3:-i h 



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7+11 SWD PARTS KITS 



MITSUMI 

VARACT0R 
UHF TUNER 

Modal UES-A56F 

$24.95 

Frco Ranga UHF47Q - 989MHz 

Antenna Input 75 ohms 
Channels 14-83 Output Channel 3 

HT PAtt 

HO HO DtfCHlMlOH 

1 VTI-SW Varactoi UNF Tuner, Model UES-AaBF . , 

2 CB1-SW Printed Cwewt Bnard, Pra-Oiillid , 

3 TP7-SW P.C.B. Peiervtiemeters, 1-2DK, 1-K. sod 

5-1 DK ohms. 7-pnc*l 

4 FH35-SW Risistir Kil, v, Watt. 5* Carbon Rim, 32-pi.tti 

5 PTI-BW Powb Tiansformi). PHI- 1 1 JVAC. SEC-24MC, 

250ma 

S FP2-SW Parul Mount PeiinnomiMs and Knobs. 1-1KBT 
and 1-SKAT w/Switcb 

7 SS14-SW i: ; 7-oa, Diadts 4-pn. Regulator! 2-pcs 

Heal Sink 1-pitcs 

B CEB-SW Elccrrn^itc Caoac.tor Kit. 9-piKls. 

9 CL33-SW Ceramic Disk Capacitor KiL 5G W.V.. 33-piKas 
IC Cl-SW Varible CaramK Trimnier Capactor Kil. 

5-BSptd, B-piacas 

CdH K.1. IBmlu. 2-piecK, 22tihi 1-pucH 
inductMS] and 1 T37-12 Fertile Tairoid 
Cwe with 3 ft ot #2B wire . . 
I,C Sockets. Tin inlay. 8-pin 5-pirca: 

■nd U-c i- 2-piec>s 

Speaker. 4x6" Oval and Prepunched 

wned Ertclnsura . . 

14 P4ISC-SW Mi;c. Parts Kit Includes Hardware. (B/32. B/32 
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When Dfdarino All Items. (1 thru t4). Tola! Prion 



emir 

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7+11 PWD PARTS KITS 



INTRODUCING OUR 
7+11 PWD 
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Ha Hd OEICmrTjON FBtCE 

1 lvn-FWD Vxaclor UHF Toner. Modal UES-A66F S24.96 

2 2CB1 -PWD Prirl-d Ciicuil Board. Pi a. dulled 18,96 

3 3TP11-PWD PCB Pmtmioioalaii 4-JJH, l-.SK, 2-1 OK, 1-K, 

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4 4FH-31-PWD Htsislor Kit. HW. 6% 2S-pts, » W 2-pcs 4.96 

5 5FI1-PWD Power TnistFanna). PBI- 11 7VAC, SEC-24VAC 

al 5C0ma 9.95 

B uPPJ-PWD Paod Mount Poteotiometeis and Knohs, 1-IKBT 

and l :■-.'." wilh switch 5.95 

7 75S17-PWD IC'i 7-pte. Diodes 4- pes, Regulators 2-acs 

Iraltseltors 2-prs. Heal Biflkl 2-pcs 29.95 

9 8CE14-PWD EIkrhVuc Capicttoi Kil, 14-pieses B.9S 

9 9CC20-PWO Cnamic Disk Capscitor Kil. 50 WV, 20- pes 7.95 

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1 1 I1ES-PWD Coil Kd. IBmlis 3-pes, .22juiii 1 -piece (pnewgond 

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13 I3SR-PW0 EneEnsura with PM SpaaVer end Pre-dnlled 

Backpanel lor moentino PCB end Ant Terms . . . 14.35 

14 14MISC-PWD Misc. Parts KiL Includii Hardware. IB.'32. 6/32 

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OPOT Am. Swilch. Fuse. Fusahaldet. etc 9.95 

15 15MC1B-PWD Mylar Capacitors. 14-pcj. and Silver 

Mica Capacitors 2-pieces ... 7.95 

When Ordering All Hants, {1.15). Total Price 159.95 



SIMPLE SIMON ELECTRONIC KITS," Inc. 

3871 S. Valley View. Suite 12, Dept. R, Las Vegas. NV 89103 

In Nevada Call: 702~O / 1 '2892 

1-800-782-3716 



MED EiOIWO* KAN ITEM* 

wnm Fan 

QUANTIir OSStOLINTS 



Outside -Nevada ChU: 



Available by Mail Order Only 
Send Check.* Or Money Order. Minimum 
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orders over $40.00, add 5% r Minimum 
Shipping and Handling $2.00. Cat. $1 .00 
— VISA and Mastercard Acceptable — 

'ChBcfc order? will be held 30 days before shipptng. 



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NO OTHER SCHOOL CAH MATCH. 

NTS HOME TRANNG INVITES YOU TO EXPLORE MICROCOMPUTERS, 
DOTAL SYSTEMS AND MORE, WITH STATE OF THE ART EQUIPMENT 
YOU ASSEMBLE AND KEEP 

Send for the full color catalog in the elec- 
tronics area of your choice -discover all the 
advantages of home study with NTS! 

NTS also offers courses in Auto Mechanics, 
Air Conditioning and Home Appliances. Check 
card for more information. 



Without question, microcomputers are the 
state of the art in electronics. And NTS is the 
only home study school that offers you 
training for this booming field with a choice 
of 3 production-model micro computers. 

We'll explain the principles of trouble- 
shooting and testing your microcomputer and, 
best of all, we'll show you how to 
program it to do what you want. 

You'll use a digital multimeter, a 
digital logic probe and other 
sophisticated testing 
gear to learn how to 
localize problems 
and solve 
them. 




We 

believe 
that training 
on production 
model equipment, 

rather than home-made learning devices, 
makes home study more exciting and rele- 
vant. That's why you'll find such gear in 
most of NTS's electronic programs. 

For instance, to learn Color TV Ser- 
vicing you'll build and keep the 25" 
(diagonal) NTS/HEATH digital color TV. 

In Communications Electronics 
you'll be able to assemble and keep 
your own NTS/HEATH 2-meter FM 
transceiver, plus test equipment. 

But no matter which program you 
choose, NTS's Project Method of instruction 
helps you quickly acquire practical know-how. 




3. The NTS/Heath HN-89A Microcomputer 

features floppy disk storage, "smart" video 
terminal, two Z80 microprocessors, with 
32K RAM Memory, expandable to 64K on 
board. 4. The NTS/Heath GR 2001 Digital 
Color TV (25" diagonal) features 
specialized AGC-SYNC muting, filtered 
color and new solid-state high voltage 
tri pier rectifier. 



NATIONAL 

TECHNICAL 

SCHOOLS 



1 The NTS/Rockwell AIM 65 
Dedicated Microcomputer A Single 
board unit featuring on board 
printer and display— 4K RAM 
(expandable). Application Functions: 
C entra I p rocessor- Con tro I fe r/ Mon i tor— 
Development System. 2. "The 
NTS/SYM-1 Microcomputer" 6502 
Based CPU-4K bytes ROM 
(expandable)- IK RAM (expandable). 51 
active I/O lines for versatile interfacing: disk 
drives, ASCII key boards, cassette tape, etc. 



NTS Triining fTognna 

In CQflUMTwf Odd 
Induitrtlir ' 



I ^ 



TECHftJ I CAL-TRADE TRAINING SINCE 19D5 
Resident and Home-Scudy Schools 

4000 SO. FIGlEFiOA ST., LOS ANGELES. CA. 90037 

NATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOLS 

4000 South Figueroa Streel, Depl. 206-102 
Los Angeles, California 90037 

Please rush FREE color catalog on course checked below 

D Auto Mechanics 
H Air Conditioning 
D Home Appliances 



; M i c roCo m pu te rat M i c ro P ro c essor s 
G Communications Electronics 
D Digital Electronics 
D Industrial Technology 



Name 



□ Color TV Servicing 

Age 



Address 



Apt. _ 
State 



_City 



Zip 



TJ Check if interested in G.I. information. 

i j Check if interested ONLY in classroom training in Los Angeles. 



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121 



Software for the Home 



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Whether it's balancing your 

checkbook, keeping track of 

your coupons, or helping 

your children learn, your 

computer can be quite a 

help around the house — if 

you have the right software. 

Here's a look at what's 

available. 



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BACK IN THE EARLY DAYS OF PERSONAL COMPl TING (A COUPLE 

of years ago) we frequently heard and read of how the new 
computers would make our lives easier by lowering our energy 
costs, keeping burglars out of our homes, insuring perfect rec- 
ords for an [RS audit, and so on. It turned out. though, that there 
was a larger and more lucrative market for business-oriented 
software than there was for software for personal use. As a 
result, somewhere along the line the "home and family" got 
lost — at least as far as the major software suppliers were con- 
cerned. Most of the home-and-family software that was avail- 
able came from computer hobbyists, and consisted of spruced- 
up editions of old games and various versions of checkbook- 
balancing programs. 

But while the business-software industry grew, a quiet revo- 
lution was taking place in software design specifically for the 
home and family. Imaginative programmers discovered there 
was money to be made in software for the home. More impor- 
tant, it was easier to sell far-out ideas for a modes [ price than to 
compete head-on with the major software houses. 

Today, homc-and-family software is no longer another ver- 
sion of some card game, or a checkbook-balancer, or another 
mailing list, or text editor, or word processor, or a way to 
convert the navy's recipe for 5000 portions of chipped-heef-on- 
toast to four family servings. Home-and- family software can 
now [each office skills, overcome reading disabilities, improve 
SAT (Scholastic .Aptitude Test) scores, provide easy aceess to 
information sources, and... well, the best way to illustrate the 
revolution in home-and-family software is to show some prac- 
tical examples. Bear in mind the fact that someol the homc-and- 
family software mentioned here may not be available for the 
particular computer you own: but. as a general rule, similar 
software is available for all popular personal computers. 

Home-and-family software covers a very broad range of 
applications. Some — perhaps most — is inexpensive, light- 
weight Huff that will make a routine task more fun. provide an 
evening's entertainment while it accomplishes a routine task, or 
uses a new method to do an old chore. For example, there's a 
program from Cottage Software that simply prints labels for 
cassettes. If you have a large cassette- library it's a great pro 
gram. That type of software generally costs little more than 
pocket change, so don't expect to be overwhelmed when you run 
it. 



HERB FRIEDMAN 

Improving reading skills 

Other home-and-family software offerings are real 
heavyweights and are priced accordingly:, but they do something 
important, something you usually can't get done any other way 
within the normal constraints of your budget, time, or lifestyle. 
For example, when I went to school a child who couldn't learn to 
read was considered a "dummy," or worse. Usually, he or she 
was the butt of a teacher's insensitive remarks. Today, we 
realize that many children who can't read suffer from the disabil- 
ity known as dyslexia; they don't perceive letters and numerals, 
or even whole words or phrases, the same way that you and I see 
them. There were also the slow readers: I was one of them. I 
simply did not see multiple phrases and/or sentences: I had to 
read everything two or three times to get an idea of what was 
being said. (Many years later, as an adult. I took a speed-reading 
course, and, after a few sessions, was able to read and com- 
prehend at normal speed.) 

Today, we have the opportunity to nip that type of reading 
problem in the bud, at an early age and right in the home, with a 
program called SpcedRcad+ from Optimized Systems Soft- 
ware, Inc. Presently available for Apple and Atari computers, 
the program teaches speed reading and comprehension by allow- 
ing the user to program the phrasing, speed, and organization of 
standard text on the computer's screen. As the user's ability 
improves he or she can reduce the display time (flash rate I ol 
each phrase, group of phrases, or paragraph, restructure the 
display, or do whatever else is needed to push on to faster 
reading and better comprehension. The program even comes 
with "tests." 

While the program obviously isn't for everyone, consider 
that, today, schools have reading specialists who have ways to 
uncover reading programs at an early age. We no longer call the 
child with a reading program a "dummy" and sit him or her in a 
corner. Perhaps convenient, flexible, reading-practice with a 
computer program in the home has greater value than the few 
minutes a day the child might spend with a reading specialist in 
the scool. Again, I'm not advocating that specific type ol soft- 
ware for everyone with reading difficulties; but I think it's an 
excellent example of the quality and importance of much of the 
homc-and-family software available today. 

Obviously, home-and-family software covers a rather broad 
range of interests. As a general rule, the type of software we'll 



122 



discuss either meets the criteria lor reasonable performance 
from a low-cost computer system, or unusual value (in some 
areas) for the family, even if a full-blown, business-type sj stem 
is required. 

Personal finance 

Let's start out with our old friend the checking-account pro- 
gram. Early versions simply took the place of check stubs; you 
could balance your month I \ or quarterly bank statement, and 
maybe "pull out"' checks of a specific type. Modern checkbook 
programs, such as Money Manager from Acorn Products, keep 
track of all your expenditures on a monthly basis. They can 
"split" acheek, or payments — for example, allocating $40.67 
ol a SI 01) check to pay the phone company and the remaining 
$59.33 for ihe supermarket. They can even lake into account 
automatic withdrawals (such as a monthly mortgage payment), 
provide subtotals in various categories, allow you to extract 
lax-deductable expenditures, and provide formatted printouts by 
category and date. While that may sound like a "business" 
database, it's not; it is intended for home-and-l'amdy expenses 
and is easier to use than a business-oriented program. 

Many software houses provide checking-account software 
similar to Acorn's, but few that are so extensive in co\ eragc and 
so easy to use. One of the other "easy" home money-managers 
is Radio Shack's Budget Management, it is somewhat different 
in that it concentrates primarily on providing great detail about 
exactly how your money was spent. Speaking from personal 
experience, 1 was absolutely astounded to discover how 
seemingly insignificant daily expenses can add up. 

Other home-and-family money-manager programs arc those 
such as Koapon Keeper from Kensott. that keep track of the 
cents-off and refund coupons you get in newspapers and junk 
mail. The exact functions of those programs vary somewhat bul 
they all work in a similar manner to help you stretch the shop- 
ping budget. Daily, weekly, or whenever you have lime, you 
enter the information from [he cents-off and refund coupons into 
the computer: their values, expiration dales, and most impor- 
tant, the types of food or products they're for. Before you go out 
for the next big family shopping-expedition you enter your 
shopping list in the computer. The program then compares your 
coupons against your shopping list and lets you know what 
coupons are available for specific items or brands. For example. 
if your list contains the entry "coffee." the computer will tell 
you which brands you have coupons for. and how much of a 
discount each offers: you then decide which to use. You can also 
call for a listing of coupons for a specific brand, or for coupons 
with a certain expiration date. If you're a dedicated coupon- 
clipper the software can really help you save! 

The cassette label-maker software from Cottage Software that 
I mentioned earlier isn't a money-saver hut it's sure to be 
valuable for someone. Thai one prints cassette labels, the kind 
you slick to both sides of the cassette. It prints on labels supplied 
on a tractor-feed paper carrier (a strip of paper with holes 
punched on both sides). If you have an extensive cassette collec- 
tion you'd like to label in library style, or you're into making 
recordings and copies for the local rock bands, or reading for the 
blind, or even distributing your own computer programs, it's a 
great way to give your cassette tapes the "pro" look, as well as 
putting a lot of data on the labels automatically. Unfortunately. 
Cottage supplies only a sample strip of the labels with the 
software; additional labels are available from them. 

Until they start itemizing their possessions, lew people have 
any idea of what ihey really own. or how much it's worth. A 
home-and-family program that could help you if you were 
burglarized is Haydcn's Personal Property Inventory. It does 
exactly what its name implies — it keeps a record of each item 
you own with a description, serial number, and value. While 
you can keep all that information on paper, it's much easier [o 
update alphabetically or chronologically if it's in the computer. 

One modification I'd like to see in "personal inventory" 
programs is the use of one of the fields to accommodate a 
"purchase number" for the purchase receipt or sales slip. That 



SOFTWARE 



I c 



would make it easier to find the actual record when it was 
needed. Each time an item was entered into the inventory, its 
sales slip would be given a purchase number. Assume, for 
example, that your home was robbed an you lost a valuable 
camera. When you ran the inventory program to find its value, it 
might also show that the sales receipt was numbered 1364. If 
you filed the sales slips in order — as you should have — it would 
be easy to find the original sales slip for the insurance company. 
The same applies to repairs. If your TV set broke down and 
your warranty required you to present the sales slip to get it 
fixed, it would be easier to locate a numbered sales slip than to 
search through a stack of them going back several years. 

Self improvement 

Education is a category in which just about everyone has an 
entry: unfortunately, much of what there is has little value. You 
do not really need a computer to teach a four-year-old that if you 
take two purple boxes from four purple boxes you arc left with 
two purple boxes fbut it looks good on a color computer). 

When 1 think of educational software I much prefer to think of 
materials that will actively assist someone to pursue an interest 
in a manner, or to a level, not normally available: or of software 
that will train someone — such as a teenager, a housewife ready 
to return to the work force, or a college student needing summer 
employment — for tomorrow's skills. 

Today, most entry-level white-collar jobs require touch typ- 
ing. College students, and others, stand a poor chance of finding 
the sort of part-time or summer employment that used to be 
called a "file clerk's" job if they can't type. Computers make 
fantastic typing teachers. Most typing programs Hash a series of 
letters on the screen which student must match in sequence by 
typing on the keyboard. The computer keeps track of errors and 
linger motion, and provides a readout of the student's "effective 
speed" after the errors are factored in. As the student pro- 
gresses, the complexity of the exercises can be increased. 

In the field of computer-aided instruction, or C.A.I, as it is 
more commonly called, the sky appears to be the limit on what's 
oflered for home-and-family use. But you must always ask 
yourself: "Does it really do any thing /or to>?" Or, better still. 
"Is this C.A.I, program worth anything?" There's a lot of 
worthless stuff around. 

Consider for a moment learning a language by computer. 
Why bother? In addition to the program, you will need an audio 
cassette to teach pronunciation. And if there is no such tape, how 
are you supposed to leam pronunciation from the screen 7 (And. 
indeed, there is a program teaching a foreign language — one of 
the most difficult to learn -that has no accompanying pro- 
nunciation tape.) 

Then there are programs that will translate a limited foreign- 
language vocabulary to English. Supposedly . that will teach you 
to read, if not speak, that language. What a waste of good 
computer time! There's a 30-dollar handheld device that will do 
the same thing.. .for what it's worth. 

But don't get me wrong — there is good C.A.I, for she home. 



O 
to 
m 
a 















TABLE 1— INDEPENDENT HOME AND FAMILY SOFTWARE SUPPLIERS 




Home and family software is available from computer manufacturers, and also from many 






independent 


suppliers such as the ones listed below. 








ACORN SOFTWARE PRODUCTS 
INC. 


COMMSOFT 

665 May be II Ave. 


DYNACOMP 

1 427 Monroe Ave. 






634 N, Carolina Ave. S.E. 


. Palo Alto, CA 94306 


Rochester, NY 14618 






Washington, DC 20003 




EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES 






ACTIVITY RESOURCES INC. 
PO Box 4875 
Hayward, CA 94540 


COMPUMAX, INC. 

POBox 1139 

Palo Alto. CA 94301 


1937 Grand Ave. 
PO Box 87 
Baldwin. NY 11510 








COMPUTER-ADVANCED IDEAS, 


EDUCATIONAL MICRO SYSTEMS 






ADDISON-WESLEY PUBLISHING 


INC. 


PO Box 471 






COMPANY 


1442A Walnut St, 


Chester, NJ 07930 






2725 Sand Hill Road 


Ciiitp -jai 








Menlo Park, CA 94025 


'., • 1 1 ' ■. O't 1 

Berkeley, CA 94709 


EN-JOY COMPUTER PRODUCTS 
PO Box 1 535 






ADVANCED OPERATING SYS- 
TEMS 


COMPUTER AIDED & MANAGED 


Goleta, CA93116 






INSTRUCTION 








450 St. John Road 


PO Box 2030 


ENTELEK 






Michigan City, IN 46360 


Goleta, CA 931 1 8 


Ward-Whidden House 




ADVENTURE INTERNATIONAL 


COMPUTER-ED 


Th° Hill 

PC Box 1303 




507 East Street 


1 Everett Rd, 


Portsmouth, NH 03801. 






Box 3435 


Carmel, NY 10512 








Longwood, FL 32750 




ETRONIX 






APPLE-CATIONS 


COMPUTER INFORMATION EX- 
CHANGE 


14803 NE 40th St. 
Redmond, WA 98052 






21650 W. Eleven Mile Road 


PO Box 159 








Suite 103 


San Luis Rey, CA 92068 


EZ SOFTWARE 






Southfield, Ml 48706 




PO Box 591 






ARTWORX SOFTWARE CO. 


COMPUTER LEARNING CONNEC- 


Novato, CA 94947 






150 N. Main Street 
Fairport, NY 14450 


TION 
One Boston Place 
Boston, MA 02108 


FUTUREVIEW 
PO Box 101 






AVANT-GARDE CREATIONS 




Joplin, MO 64802 






PO Box 30161 


COMPUTER SHACK 


GOOTH SOFTWARE 






Eugene, OR 97403 


1691 Bason 
Pontiac, Ml 48054 


931 S. Bemiston 
St. Louis, MO 63105 






BARGAINBYTE 










PO Box 23195 


THE COMPUTERIZED SHOPPER 


J.L. HAMMETT COMPANY, INC. 






Harahan, LA 70183 


3545 El Camino Real 
Palo Alto, CA 94306 


Hammett PI 
PO Box 545 






BASICS AND BEYOND, INC. 




Braintree, MA 02184 






Box 10 


COMPUTRON1CS 








Amawalk, NY 10501 


50 N. Pascack Rd. 
Spring Valley, NY 10977 


HARTLEY SOFTWARE 
PO Box 431 






BELL AND HOWELL 




Dimondale, Ml 48821 






7100 N. McCormick Road 


COOK'S COMPUTER COMPANY 








Chicago, IL 60645 


1905 Bailey Dr. 


HAYDEN 






BLUEBIRD'S COMPUTER SOFT- 


Marshalltown, IA 50158 


50 Essex St. 






WARE 




Rochelle Park. NJ 07662 






2267 23rd Street 


COTTAGE SOFTWARE 








Wyandotte, Ml 48192 


614 N. Harding 


HIGH TECHNOLOGY SOFTWARE 






Wichita, KS 67208 


PRODUCTS INC. 






BRAIN BOX 




PO Box 14665 






Rm W 9Rth Street 


CREATIVE COMPUTING 


8001 N. Classen Blvd. 




, New York, NY 10003 


39 E. Hanover Ave. 
Morris Plains. NJ 07950 


Oklahoma City, OK 73113 




BUSINESS AND PLEASURE SOFT- 




HOWE SOFTWARE 




WARE 


CREATIVE SOFTWARE 


14 Lexington Rd. 




601 1 San Felipe 
Houston. TX 77057 


201 San Antonio Circle #270 


New York, NY 10956 




Mountain View, CA 94040 












INFORMATION UNLIMITED SOFT- 






CALIFORNIA SOFTWARE 


CYBERTRONICS INTERNATIONAL 


WARE 




tf> 


PO Box 275 


999 Mt. Kemble Ave. 


281 Arlington Ave, 




O 

2 


El CerritO. CA 94530 


Morristown, NJ 07960 


Berkely, CA 94707 




o 
a. 


CLASS 1 SYSTEMS 


DR. DALEY'S SOFTWARE 


INSTANT SOFTWARE 




6 


17909 Maple St. 


Water St. 


Peterborough, NH 03458 




_i 

HI 


Lansing, IL 60438 


Darby, MT 59829 


INTELLIGENT INVESTOR 




6 


COMMDATA SYSTEMS 


DRESEN ASSOCIATES 


810 Camelview Plaza 




D 


PO Box 325 


PO Box 248 


6900 E. Camelback Rd. 




< 

a. 


1 ^^ U^A *«*£_*■* 

Milford. Ml 48042 


Dresen, ME 04342 


Scottsdale, AZ 85251 _^_^_ 




124 


[ 

















INTERNATIONAL SOFTWARE 


MERRY BEE COMMUNICATIONS 


PRESCRIPTION LEARNING 


MARKETING, LTD. 


815 Crest Dr. 


1301 S. Wabash Ave. 




120 E. Washington St. 


Omaha, NE 68046 


Chicago, IL 60605 




Syracuse, NY 13202 










META SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 


PROGRAM DESIGN, INC. (POI) 




INTERPRETIVE EDUCATION 


4737 Trumbull SE 


11 Idar Court 




2306 Winters Dr. 


Albuquerque, NM 87108 


Greenwich. CT 06830 




Kalamazoo, Ml 49002 










MICROGNOME 


THE PROGRAMMER'S INSTITUTE 




INVESTOR SOFTWARE 


5843 Montgomery Rd. 


PO Box 3191 




48 Iron Ship Plaza 


Elkridge, MD 21227 


Chapel Hill, NC 27514 




San Francisco. CA 941 1 1 










MICROLAB 


PROGRAMS FOR LEARNING 




J & S SOFTWARE 


2310 Skokie Valley Rd, 


PO Box 954 




140 Raid Ave, 


Highland Park. IL 60035 


New Milford, CT 06776 




Port Washington, NY 1 1050 










MICRO LEARNINGWARE 


PROGRAM RESEARCH AND SOFT- 




KATES KOMPUTERS 


POBox 2134 


WARE CORP. 




PO Box 1675 


N. Mankato, MN 56001 


257 Central Park West 




Sausalito, CA 94965 


MICROMATIC PROGRAMMING CO. 


New York, NY 10024 




KENSOFT 


POBox 158 


QUALITY EDUCATION DESIGN 




2102 50th St. 


Georgetown. CT 06829 


PO Box 1 2486 




Kenosha. Wl 53140 


MICRO POWER & LIGHT CO. 


Portland, OR 97212 




KRELL SOFTWARE 


12820 Hillcrest Rd., No. 224 


QUALITY SOFTWARE 




21 Millbrook Dr. 


Dallas, TX 75230 


6660 Reseda Blvd. No. 1 05 




Stony Brook, NY 11790 


MONUMENT COMPUTER SERVICE 


Reseda, CA 92335 




LEARNING TOOLS INC. 


Village Data Center 


RELL 




4 Washburn PI. 


PO Box 603 


1145 Stanford Ave. 




Brookline, MA 02146 


Joshua Tree. CA 92252 


Redondo Beach, CA 90278 




LEVEL IV PRODUCTS INC. 

32461 School Craft 
Livonia, Ml 48150 


MUSE SOFTWARE 
347 N. Charles St. 
Baltimore, MD 21201 

NATIONAL SOFTWARE MARKET- 


RESOURCE SOFTWARE IN- 
TERNATIONAL 
1 40 Sylvan Ave. 
Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632 




THE LIBERTY SOFTWARE CO. 


ING 


RIGHT ON PROGRAMS 




635 Independence Ave. SE 


4701 Mckinley St. 


PO Box 977 




Washington, DC 20003 


Hollywood, FL 33021 


Huntington. NY 11743 




LIGHTNING SOFTWARE 


OCO, INC. 


SCOTT, FORESMAN & CO. 




POBox 11725 
Palo Alto, Ca 94306 


1001 J. Bridgeway, Suite 128 


1900 East Lake Ave. 




Sausalito, CA 94965 


Glenview, IL 60025 




LITTLE GENIUS 
34-38rd St. 
Jackson Heights, NY 


OPTIMIZED SYSTEMS SOFTWARE 
10379 Lansdale Ave. 
Cupertino, CA 95014 


SERENDIPITY SYSTEMS INC. 

225 Elmira Rd. 
Ithaca. NY 14850 




L & S COMPUTERWARE 


OPTIONS-80 


SILWA ENTERPRISES, INC. 




1589 Fraser Dr. 


PO Box 471 


PO Box 400 




Sunnyvale, CA 94087 


Concord, MA 01 742 


Big Flats, NY 14814 




MACROTRONICS, INC. 


OSBORNE McG RAW- HILL 


SOFTBYTE COMPUTING 




1125 N. Golden State Blvd. 


630 Bancroft Way 


Box 217 




Suite G 


Berkeley, CA 9471 


Wallingford, CT 06492 




Turlock, CA 95380 










PCD SYSTEMS 


THE SOFTWARE CONNECTION 




MANHATTAN SOFTWARE 


PO Box 143 


10703 Meadowhill Rd. 




PO Box 1063 


Pen Yan, NY 14527 


Silver Spring, MD 20901 




Woodland Hills, CA 91365 








MASTERWORKS SOFTWARE INC. 


PEAR SYSTEMS CORP. 


THE SOFTWARE EXCHANGE 
6 South St. 




1823 W. Lomita Blvd. 
Lomita, CA 90717 


27 Briar Brae Rd. 
Stamford. CT 06903 


Milford, NH 03055 
SOFTWARE HOUSE INC. 




MED SYSTEMS SOFTWARE 


POWERSOFT CORP. 


695 East 10th North 




PO Box 2674 


PO Box 157 


Logan, UT 84321 




Chapel Hill, NC 27514 


Pitman, NJ 08071 


SOFTWARE RESOURCES, INC. 




MENTOR SOFTWARE 


PRACTICAL PROGRAMS 


286 Alewife Brook Pkwy. 


O 


Box 791 


1104 Aspen Dr. 


Suite 310 


3 


Anoka, MN 55303 


Toms River, NJ 78377 


Cambridge, MA 02138 


3 

OT 


MERCER SYSTEMS INC. 


PRENTICE HALL 


SOLARTEK 


rrt 


87 Scooter Lane 


Sylvan Ave. 


PO Box 298 


CO 


Hicksville, NY 11801 


Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632 


Guiderland. NY 12048 


m 
w 

125 









SOUTHFORK SOFTWARE 


STORYBOOKS OF THE FUTURE 


TYCOM ASSOCIATES 


68 Fairlake Dr. 


527 41st Ave. 


63 Velma Ave. 


Hattiesburg. MS 39401 


San Francisco, CA 94121 


Pittsfieid, MA 01201 


SOUTHWEST EDPSYCHE SER- 


TARA 


MAX ULE AND CO., INC. 


VICES 


PO Box 118 


6 E. 43rd St. 


PO Box 1870 


Selden.NY 11784 


New York, NY 10017 


Phoenix, AZ 85001 








TERRAPIN, INC. 


UNICOM 


SPECTRUM SOFTWARE 
142 Carlow 


678 Massachusetts Ave. 
Cambridge, MA 02139 


297 Elmwood Ave. 
Providence, Rl 02907 


Sunnyvale, CA 94067 


T.H.E.S.I.S. 

PO Box 147 


VERSA COMPUTING, INC. 


STANDARD AND POORS CORP. 


3541 Old Conejo Rd. Suite 104 
Newbury Park, Ca 91320 


25 Broadway 


Garden City, Ml 48135 


New York, NY 10004 




WE SOFTWARE 




3 R SOFTWARE 


800 Greenwich Dr. 


STEKETEE EDUCATIONAL SOFT- 


PO Box 3115 


Chico, CA 95926 


WARE 


Jamaica, NY 11431 




4639 Spruce St 




WINDOW INC. 


Philadelphia, PA 19139 


TIME SHARE CORP. 


469 Pleasant St. 




Hanover, NH 03755 


Watertown, MA 02172 


STERLING SWIFT PUBLISHING 






CO. 


TYC SOFTWARE 


XPS INC. 


1600 Fortview Rd, 


40 Stuyvesant Manor 


323 York Rd. 


Austin, TX 78704 


Geneseo, NY 14454 


Carlisle, PA 17013 



CO 

y 

z 
o 

o 

LU 
-J 
LU 

6 



126 



For example. Atari has a lovely reading-comprehension pro- 
gram for youngsters ages X and up. and nicely structured basic 
ant! advanced vocabulary builders. 1 1 you have a youngster with 
some reading ami vocabulary problems in school a good, fun- 
filled, home-and-family program can be a decided asset It 
work> because the computer is doing what it does best — 
patiently repeating itself, over and over, without becoming 
bored or tired. (Others besides Atari offer reading and vocab- 
ulary builders, but some are belter than others. Take a look at the 
software before you buy: make sure it's suitable for your child.) 

As for unusual education, consider a map of the heavens. 
There are probably ten programs thai prim a map of the U.S. ami 
ask the child to indicate the slate capitals. But what about the 
budding astronomer in your family? For him or her. high adven- 
ture might be a trip to the local planetarium: but imagine a 
planetarium — actually a map of the heavens — on your home 
computer! The Star Search Astronomy Guide from Softbyte 
Computing will display a map of the overhead skies for north 
and south of the equator, with double stars, galactic and planet 
ary nebula, open and globular clusters, and the external galaxies 
all shown in scale according to their polar coordinates for any 
24-hour period of any day in the year. The screen also displays a 
lot oi information such as the Messier number (if assigned). 
magnitude, right ascension, etc. li's pure gold to an amateur 
astronomer, and it costs only $20 lor the cassette \crsion. 

Speaking of gold, one of the hoi commercial databases is the 
one supplied by Dow Jones lor the professionals w ho wheel and 
deal in Stocks and bonds. The problem for the amateur dabbler in 
ihe market is that the professional databases aren't cheap. 
There's lots of home-and-family software around, though, spe- 
cifically intended lor those who think they can outperform the 
professional money-managers. There's software that lets you 
create bar charts of trading prices on a daily, weckl) . monthly or 
yearly basis, create comparison charts, and construct any model 
that you think will outperform the Dow Jones averages. If you 
the tune in fuss with ihosc programs— meaning loading 
them with data — you probably could play the market with some 
reasonable degree of computer-aided expertise. 

For those who don't want to develop new ways to gamble in 
die stuck market, hm who own stocks and bonds, there arc 
several programs — at least one forevery model computer — that 
simply keep track ol your investments, income, sales, ete. 

Recreational programs 

Getting away from the serious end of personal computing for 
the home and family . do you know who your ancestors are, how 



they interrelate, and where you and yours stand in the order of 
things.' Well, a program such as Your Family Tree from Acorn 
Software traces your ancestry, shows who is related to whom, 
and might even show that you are ninty-sixth in line to the 
English throne. Naturally, the more data you can locate and feed 
into the program, the more detailed the results will be. While the 
family tree might not be your cup of lea, there are many good 
people who get a lot of pleasure out of discovering who married 
whom — and who didn't. 

And when you finally assemble the living members of the 
family tree and get them together for a family blow-out, how 
will you fare when you serve the libations — otherwise known as 
drinks'? Arc you the type who serves whiskey sours in a wine 
glass? Do your pina eoladas look more like brandy alcxanders? 
If you want to make like a pro bartender at the family feast, but 
can't tell a cocktail glass from a wine decanter, there's a pro- 
gram especially for you called Bartender . from En-Joy Compu- 
ter Products that lists 84 different drinks. It tells you the recipe 
and gives a graphic display of the correct glass to serve it in . You 
can either run through the entire list alphabetically to learn the 
craft, or call up a specific drink. It sure makes for great con- 
versation to have your computer on the bar and let the guests 
watch you prepare drinks according to its instructions. 

Got a yen to make like the folks who created the computer 
grpahJcs in TRON? Skewh-80 from quality Software will let you 
draw figures on the computer screen, move them around, en- 
large and shrink them. In short, you enter the world of computer 
art. Who knows: the next call from Hollywood might be foryou. 

Are you a coach in Little League or Midget football, or do you 
help run the PAL (Police Athletic League) basketball program? 
Your local computer shop will probably have a goodly assort- 
ment of computer scoring-systems that will determine each 
player's performance for various skills for each game, or cumu- 
latively for all games played. It's a heck of a way to run a kids 
team, but if you're one of those coaches out to win at any cost, 
there's a team -perform a nee program just made for you. 

As you can see, there's home-and-family software tor just 
about any application, and at just about every intellectual level. 
We've only looked at the lip of the iceberg to give you an idea of 
the large subject-range available for personal computers. 

While not every program we've mentioned is available for 
every personal computet , as we stated way back at the beginn- 
ing, there is similar software for the most popular models. Write 
to the companies mentioned here and in Table 1 , read the ads, 
and- — of course— check svith your local computer store to see 
what they have or can get for you . R-E 



Telecommunications 



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V*r*Un 116.11.11 







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Hook your computer into 
a vast network of 
resources and information. 
AH you need is a modem, 
software, and a telephone 

HERB FRIEDMAN 



IN THE EARLY DAYS OF COMPUTING THERE WAS NO SUCH THING 

as a personal computer. There were mainframe computers and 
minicomputers, which were sort of scaled -down mainframes. 
Users generally accessed the computers through terminals that 
consisted of essentially two devices in a common cabinet: a 
keyboard that sent signals entered by the user to the computer, 
and a display that displayed the information the computer sent 
back to the user. Depending on the particular terminal, the 
display generated either a "hard copy," meaning it was printed 
on paper, or a "soft copy," meaning it was displayed on a CRT 
screen. 

If the terminal was located close to the computer, it was 
usually directly connected through wires. If the terminal was 
remote from the computer, it was normally connected through 
some form of telephone circuit — either a dedicated high-speed 
line, or the slower (usually 1 10 to 300 baud) voice-grade dial-up 
telephone system. 

Naturally, if one can feed information in and out of a compu- 
er through a terminal, it's almost as easy to have computers talk 
to each other, passing data back and forth even when no one is 
around. Any of the mainframe computers can be instructed to 
automatically dial-up or interconnect with another computer to 
swap data. 

The terminal system was adequate for many, many years, 
particularly for ■'time-sharing" systems. In time-sharing, the 
computer automatically samples the input from many terminals, 
all feeding in at the same time. It samples information in the 
correct order, maintains the input/output from each terminal 
independently, and automatically holds up input from the ter- 
minals if necessary; in effect, time-sharing makes it appear as if 
each terminal user is the only one using the computer. Another 
feature of time sharing systems is that they usually provide 
access to several programming languages, data storage and 
processing, and special services. The system works well, except 
for the fact that the printers and all other peripherals are usually 
located at the computer, miles away from the terminal. 

Now, thanks to the personal computer, all of that has 
changed. The user can have everything at his or her fingertips: 
tape or disk storage, printers, card readers, and the like. Ik- or 
she also can use many programming languages, including ex- 
tended MicraSoft BASIC, a powerful high-level language. 



Even somewhat decent versions of Fortran, Cobol, and Pascal 
are available for personal computers. 

Personal computers do have one major limitation, however: 
They can not access the major databases, or software written for 
other machines, very easily. For example, if your friend on the 
other side of town has written exactly the software you need to 
run your bowling league, but his version is written for a Com- 
modore or Atari computer and you have an Apple, there's no 
way you can run his software directly, even if he gives you a 
copy of his disk or tape. 

Then again, there are many people writing good software they 
are willing to share at little or no charge if you can access their 
computer through a CBB (Community bulletin Board). That, in 
its most basic form, is simply a personal computer that can be 
accessed by anyone by simply placing a telephone call. There 
are also commercial databases, such as The Source and Com- 
puServe Information Service, which provide various services, 
including stock data, newspaper and magazine articles, forums 
for computer user groups — the list is almost endless. All of that, 
and more, can be accessed directly by a personal computer, if 
the computer could be made to "think" that it is a terminal . That 
is easy enough to do because there is software for that purpose 
available for virtually any personal computer. Some can even be 
obtained from CBB's or user groups, again at little or no cost; 
we'll look at the commercially available terminal programs later 
in this article. 

Before we confuse the subject, let's take time out to explain 
the difference between a terminal and something called a 
"host." A host is simply the computer that is accessed by a 
terminal or another computer. In our example of the early 
mainframe computer and time-sharing systems, the computer 
was the host. 

There was no problem here because it was the only host. But 
personal computers are something else. Load one with one type 
of software and it serves as a terminal. Use other software and it 
serves as a host to which other terminals or computers can be 
connected. For example, assume you have created a database of 
all the articles in Radio-Electronics tor the past 20 years. Your 
buddy on the other side of town wants to locate an article on the 
invention of the transistor. If he programs his Commodore 
computer to function as a terminal . and you have programmed 



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your computer to serve as a host (sometimes it doesn't even need 
a special program), he can dial your phone, your computer will 
answer and download the data from your Radio-Electronics 
database — your computer serves as the host. Got the picture"' If 
not. read it again because it's important if you're to understand 
the rest of this article. 

When computers talk to each other or to terminals, that is 
called telecommunications, and all that is ever meant when 
someone refers to "personal computer telecommunications" is 
that a personal computer is being used to exchange data or 
software with another computer or terminal. 

Modems 

Two things make personal computer telecommunications 
possible: the modem and the software. The term modem is an 
acronym derived from MOdulator/Z?£Modulator. It's a device 
that converts the electrical signals of a computer to audio signals 
that can be transmitted over the telephone line. 

For persona! computers, modems are usually Bell- 103 com- 
patible, meaning they're compatible with the type- 103 modem 
used to transmit data at up to 300 baud over the voice-grade 
telephone system. (For commercial use, especially when the 
computers are mainframes, there are modems that can transmit 
at 9600 baud, but those require the use of a special dedicated 
telephone hook-up.) 

Modem technology was originally developed for use with 
mainframe computers and the technical terms used to describe 
modem operation arc left over from those days. Since the access 
to the computer originated at the terminal, the modem used at the 
terminal was called an originate modem, transmitting to the 
computer on 1 270 and 1070 Hz and receiving from the computer 
on 2225 and 2025 Hz. Since the computer answered the ter- 
minal, the modem used at the computer— or host — end of the 
circuit was called an answer modem: it transmits on 2225 and 
2025 Hz and receives on 1270 and 1070 Hz. the exact reverse of 
the answer modem. For many years the only modem commonly 
available to users of personal computers were originate-only, 
because "home" computers only served as terminals. With few 
exceptions, there was very little thought given to providing a 
way for personal computers to "converse" with other personal 
computers. 

But the modem user of personal computers finds there is often 
a need for his computer to converse with another, such as when 
swapping software or data. The way that is done is to provide 
one terminal with an answer modem: it doesn't matter which 
computer has the answer modem as long as the telecommunica- 
tions circuit consists of one answer and at least one originate 
modem. Because of the considerable interest that is developing 
in telecommunications between personal computers, many low- 
cost modems are now available with switch-selected or automa- 
tic originate and answer operating modes. The user with the 
double- function switch -selected modem flips the selector to the 
opposite of that being used by the other computer. If it is an 
automatic modem, it senses the frequencies of the received tones 
and automatically shifts to the required operating mode (origin- 
ate or answer). 

There are several types of modems available for personal 
computers, with new ones seemingly appearing every month or 
so. The most basic models are the manually switched originate 
and originate/answer modems. Personal -computer modems 
have an RS-232 input7output. (Commercial modems can also 
include a 20 mA current drive. orTTL. or whatever: but mod- 
ems for personal computer use always have, at the very least, an 
RS-232 I/O.) 

If the computer doesn't have an RS-232 interlace it must be 
added to the computer. For example, the RS-232 interface is 
optional on the Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I and Model 111 
computers. Commodore computers require a special interlace to 
covert their IEEE^I88 I/O to RS-232. In addition, there are two 
very popular non-RS-232 modems. One is from the Mi- 
cropcripheral Corp.: it connects directly to the TRS-80 Model 1 
keyboard, eliminating the expense of the expansion and RS-232 



TABLE 1— UNITERM COMMAND LISTING 

A - ACTIVATE AUTO BUFFER OPEN/CLOSE FEATURE 

B - LOAD AND SAVE BINARY FILES 

C -CLOSE BUFFER 

D -DISPLAY OR PRINT BUFFER 

E - EXIT TO DOS 

H - SELECT HALF OR FULL DUPLEX 

I - DEFINE INITIALIZATION PARAMETERS 

L - LOAD ASCII FILE TO BUFFER 

M - CHANGE MODEM PARAMETERS 

O - OPEN AND ZERO BUFFER 

P - TRANSMIT BUFFER IN PROMPT FORM 

R - TRANSMIT BUFFER WITH AUTO 

OPEN'CLOSE BUFFER CODES 
S - SAVE BUFFER IN ASCII FORMAT 
T - TRANSMIT BUFFER (NORMAL) 
W - SET SCREEN WIDTH 
X - TYPE TO BUFFER 



interfaces. Another variation is the D.C. Hayes Micromodem 11 
modem for the Apple computer. It plugs directly into one of the 
slots in the Apple computer and docs not require an RS-232 I/O, 
There are modems that automatically dial a telephone number 
from a disk directory, or from the computer keyboard, and 
models that automatically answer the telephone and connect the 
computer when a "carrier" tone from another is received. But 
all that is a subject for another time, so let's move along lousing 
the modems for telecommunications, and the special software 
necessary. 

TERMINAL OR 
PERSONAL COMPUTES IN 
TERMINAL MODI 



I 




FIG. 1 — IN FULL DUPLEX operation, the keyboard sends a character to the 
computer and the computer "echoes" the character back to the display. 

The standard modem circuit used for terminals, and personal 
computers functioning as terminals, is "full duplex", meaning 
that the terminal functions as a separate keyboard and display , as 
shown in Figure I . The keyboard transmits a character to the 
computer. The computer echoes the character back to the dis- 
play, confirming that the transmission is correct. If the character 
displayed doesn't match what was sent to the computer, the user 
knows that he has big problems somewhere in the circuit. The 
echo is usually instantaneous, and it is often assumed by new- 
comers to personal computing that the display shows what the 
keyboard is sending. Not true. It shows what the computer 
assumes it has received; it's confirmation from the computer. 

Some modems can also operate in what is called half-duplex, 
which has two operating modes. Generally, the display shows 
what is sent by the keyboard and then the echo from the compu- 
ter. For example, the transmission HELP would appear in half- 
duplex as HHEELLPP. Some so-called half-duplex modems 
actually cancel the echo, displaying only the keyboard entry. 
HELP would appear as' HELP; it looks correct but it is not a 
computer confirmation. While that system has its applications, 
it is not particularly good for use with personal computers. 

Terminal software 

None of the popular personal computers can operate directly 
as a terminal, At the \vr\ least they require some "terminal" 
software, if not some special hardware in addition to the modem 
itself. Selecting the appropriate terminal software is important. 



as ii is the software that determines how much flexibility you can 
get from your personal computer. 

The terminal software is of two varieties: dumb and smart. A 
dumb terminal is the functional equivalent of the basic terminal 
consisting of the keyboard and the display. Your compute! 
might have four disk drives, and many-thousand bytes of mem- 
ory, but if it functions as a dumb terminal all you can use is the 
keyboard and the display. Smart terminals, depending on the 
particular software, can use the disk and tape storage systems as 
well as all memory and external peripherals. They also can 
exchange software with other computers, and some even auto- 
matically convert the peculiarities of one computer system for 
another. For example, most personal-computer terminals output 
data in ASCII, but mainframes often use EBCDIC (Extended 
Binary Coded Decimal /nterchange Code). If your personal 
computer is "talking" to a mainframe, the proper software will 
convert the incoming EBCDIC code to ASCI I . and the outgoing 
ASCII to EBCDIC. Or, it can automatically correct for whatever 
the user wants, substituting different characters for standard 
codes. 

The exact terminal features provided by your personal com- 
puter will depend on the type of terminal software you purchase , 
and its price. As a general rule, the more you pay the more you 
gel. For example, the original terminal software for the TRS-80 
was very basic, providing the standard full duplex configuration 
but leaving a few non-standard codes in place of standard ASCII 
characters. On the other hand. The Microperipheral Corpora- 
tion's basic TRS-80 software, which is supplied with their mod- 
ems for the TRS-80 computer, provides the special ASCII sym- 
bols required by some time-sharing services that arc not inherent 
in the TRS-80; and the software provides a notable "extra" 
feature— a screen print feature that allows whatever is displayed 
on the screen to be printed (provided, of course, that you have a 
printer). 

To use all the capabilities of your personal computer for 
telecommunciations you need smart terminal software, and here 
the sky's the limit as to functions and price. On the surface it 
seems that every software writer has his own idea of what is 
important and desirable. Some inexpensive smart software pro- 
vides the most commonly desired features, has but a few com- 
mands, and is extremely easy to use. Other smart terminal 
programs are loaded with every conceivable feature, and are so 
difficult to use that the casual user must often make frequent 
references to the documentation in order to perform what should 
be an insignificant procedure. 

How smart you want your computer to be. and the number of 
desired functions, will determine the complexity of the particu- 
lar software you need. For example, a universal terminal pro- 



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OMNITERM, from Lindbergh Systems, is a smart-terminal program thai 
displays the command list on your computer's screen. 

gram from BT Enterprises called Uniterm can automatically 
configure itself for one of four possible computer/ modem com- 
binations. It can accommodate a variety of printers, be con- 
figured in different "permanent" versions for various host 
computers, and accommodate different screen widths. It can 
also upload or download software in both ASCII and binary, 
transmit automatic sign-on-messages, and — well, the list is 
seemingly endless, because Uniterm was intended to accommo- 
date almost every possible desired or necessary smart-terminal 
procedure. It can even skip over the perforations on continuous- 
form paper (tractor feed or web-mounted single sheets) used 
with friction feed printers. 

Documentation is notably good (not excellent — very little 
software documentation can be accurately described as ex- 
cellent), going into specific details on using several popular 
brands of modems. One of the really nice features is that the 
screen will display the command list, as shown in Table I , 
which the user can access directly. 

Another smart-terminal program that displays the command 
list on the screen is Omniterm from Lindbergh Systems. It has 
many similar features and functions as Uniterm. A major differ- 
ence is that Omniterm is very heavy into special character 
configurations (conversions). It can be reconfigured to receive 
and transmit virtually any deviation from standard ASCII, even 
the complete code if necessary. 

A much more basic smart-terminal program, also much less 



TABLE 2— DIRECTORY OF INDEPENDENT MODEM MANUFACTURERS 

In addition to computer manufacturers, modems are available from many independent manufacturers, 

such as the ones listed below. 



APF ELECTRONICS, INC. 

1501 Broadway 
New York, NY 10036 

BIZCOMP 

Box 7498 

Menlo Park, CA 94025 

HAYES MICROCOMPUTER PRODUCTS 

5385 Peach tree Corners East 
Norcross, GA 30092 

LEXICON CORPORATION OF MIAMI 

1541 NW 65th Avenue 
Plantation, FL 33313 

LIVERMORE DATA SYSTEMS 

2050 151 st Place NE 
Redmond, WA 98952 



THE MICROPERIPHERAL CORP. 
2643 151st Place NE 
Redmond, WA 98052 

MULTI-TECH SYSTEMS, INC. 

82 Second Avenue SE 
New Brighton, MN 55112 

NOVATION 

18664 Oxnard St. 
Tarzana, CA 91356 

OMNITECH DATA 

2405 South 20th St. 
Phoenix, AZ 85034 

QUEST ELECTRONICS 
P.O. Box 4430E 
Santa Clara, CA 95054 



RACAL-VADIC INC. 
222 Caspian Drive 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 



TNW CORP. 

3351 Hancock St. 
San Diego, CA92110 



US ROBOTICS 

203 N. Wabash, Suite 718 
Chicago, IL 60601 



UNIVERSAL DATA SYSTEMS 

5000 Bradford Drive 
Huntsville. AL 35805 




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TABLE 3— INDEPENDENT TERMINAL SOFTWARE SUPPLIERS 


In addition to computer 


manufacturers, terminal software is available from many independent suppliers, 




such as the ones listed below. 




ACE COMPUTER PRODUCTS 


EIGEN SYSTEMS 


NELSON SOFTWARE SYSTEMS 


OF FLORIDA 


PO Box 10234 


PO Box 19096 


1640 NW 3rd Street 


Austin, TX 78766 


Minneapolis. MN 55419 


Deerfield Beach, FL 33441 


INSTANT SOFTWARE 




APPARAT, INC. 

4401 S. Tarmarac Parkway 


Peterborough, NH 03458 


SMALL BUSINESS SYSTEMS GROUP 


Denver. CO 80237 
B.T. ENTERPRISES 


MICROCOM 

1 400A Providence Highway 

Norwood, MA 02062 


6 Carlisle Road 
Westford, MA 08166 


1 71 Hawkins Road 






Centereach, NY 11720 

CAWTHON SCIENTIFIC GROUP 

24224 Michigan Ave. 


MICROSTUF, INC. 
1900 Leland Dr. 
Suite 12 


SOUTHWESTERN DATA SYSTEMS 
PO Box 582 
Santee, CA 92071 


Dearborn, Ml 48124 


Marietta, GA 30067 




DYNACOMP, INC. 


MUMFORD MICRO SYSTEMS 


VISICORP 


1427 Monroe Ave. 


Box 400-E 


2895 Zanker Road 


Rochester, NY 14618 


Summerland, CA 93067 


San Jose, CA 95134 



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expensive, is Telcom from Mumford Micro Systems — u nice 
program to use between two personal computers because it has 
programmable echo, will exchange both ASCII and binary data, 
and is fuss-free. It also has a very simple printer control that 
prints both the incoming and outgoing characters. It has an 
associated spooler that will store up to 256 characters if the 
printer should be slower than the information input to it. Unlike 
the super-smart terminal programs that can redefine virtually 
every code, Telcom provides up to ten special characters and can 
store eight custom messages. There is no on-screen command 
display, but the documentation supplied with the program is 
good 

A somewhat unusual smart-terminal program for personal 
computers is the Heath/Zenith CPS (Computerized Phone Sys- 
tem) for their H8 and H89/Z89 computers. CPS is configured 
specifically for use with CompuServe and other Heath/Zenith 
computers, and it uses the special-function keys found on the 
H89/Z89 computer, it will automatically log the user on to 
CompuServe at the touch of a single function key (though many 
other smart terminals can be programmed to do the same thing). 
It has the automatic protocols for transmitting files (from disk) 
through CompuServe's Micronet, or another Heath Zenith com- 
puter (or it will operate with no protocols >, and it has most of the 
other smart-terminal features such as a rcsetahle clock and echo 
(when serving as a host or for computcr-to-computer com- 
munication). 

One very nice feature is that text can be saved in memory. 
Everything coming in can be saved in memory automatically, as 
it appears on the screen, or just selected portions can be saved by 
turning the buffer on and off from the terminal's keypad without 
entering the command mode. A count of available bytes in the 
buffer is continuously displayed. Finally, the memory can be 
dumped to disk under a specific file name . to be printed or edited 
at a future time. It's all very similar to what's available with 
other smart-terminal software, but what sets this software apart 
is that it is considerably more convenient to use; that is mainly 
because the operating functions of the terminal's special- 
function keys are always displayed in reverse video on the 
bottom line. 

One notable difference between CPS and other smart- 
terminal software is that CPS can handle data files only in ASCII 
form; the presently available version does not accommodate the 
transfer of binary files. 

Virtually alt Other terminal software tor personal computing is 
similar to those that we have already coveted. It is logical to 



assume, however, that many personal computers will also 
used for business applications, and the casual user in the home 
might want or require access in the Western Union Telex li 
(TWX) network. For them, there is software such as TXL Telex 
Link from the Cawthon Scientific Group, TXL allows the per- 
sonal computer to function as an intelligent telex station, replac- 
ing the conventional paper-tape telex machine. With a paper- 
tape telex machine, the outgoing message is first punched on a 
paper tape, which allows correction of typing errors. When the 
tape is "perfect", it is passed through a paper-tape reader that 
transmits the message from the tape. With the TXL software, the 
user prepares the message using a text editor: then TXL auto- 
matically formats the text tor telex and transmits the file, Incom- 
ing telex messages are received and displayed, the date and time 
is added to them, and they are then written to disk storage 
Essentially . TXL is smart-terminal software tailored for a specif- 
ic kind of telecommunications. 

From one computer to another 

Finally, let's close with an unusual application of smart- 
terminal software. 1 have several different personal computers al 
the office, Often. 1 find that software I have written in BASIC 
for one computer might be better running on another system, or a 
department with a different computer asks for a copy . What I do 
in that instance is to load one computer with elementary .smart- 
terminal software. 

The other computer is loaded with smart-terminal software 
that permits extensive reconfiguring of the ASCII codes, and it 
is reconfigured for the first computer. For example, when feed- 
ing TRS-W BASIC programs to a Heath H89. The RS-232 1'Os 
of the computers are connected together with the send and 
receive connections at one computer reversed. Press the buttons 
and the program goes hassle-free from One system to another. 
About the only remaining problems would be to clean up a few 
syntax errors caused by the different versions of BASIC so that 
the program runs correctly. 

That is exactly the same procedure you would use to exchange 
programs between different computers via a telephone link: the 
only major difference is that I have substituted a direct-wire 
connection for the modem-based telecommunications circuit. 
Obviously, a link between different computers must be done in 
ASCII: for personal computers, binary files can be transmitted 
only between the same type of computers, using smart-terminal 
software that specifically allows binary upload and download of 
the memory . R-E 



SOFTWARE 



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Dial-up 
Software Networks 



The large databases offer a 
vast array of information and 
services, but just how useful 
or necessary are they for the 
personal computer user? 



Dial-up 




HERB FRIEDMAN 



Networks 



Till-. WOK 1. 1) Al YOUR COMMAND! rOMMOROVv S NfiWS Today! 

Weather reports from around the world! Advice by experts on 
everything — from what's new in electronics and photography to 
advice to the lovelorn! Stock market information that will make 
you an instant millionaire — assuming you started with S2 mil- 
lion (that's a stock trader's joke)! More information than was 
stored in the legendary great library at Alexandria. 

And where is this fountain of information? It is in the data- 
bases of The Source (1616 Anderson Road, McLean, VA 
22102) and the ( tompuServc Information Service (5(XX) Arling- 
ton Centre Blvd. , Columbus, OH 43220)— at least that's what's 
implied by the claims made by both, 

From humble beginnings 

CompuServe, which is owned by H & R Block (the tax 
people), and The Source, now owned by Reader'-- Digest, both 
Started out primarily as a way for computer hobbyists wiih 
"home" computers to obtain mainframe computet services at 
moderate cost. This included better programming languages 
(such as advanced version of BASIC, APL, FORTRAN, and 
now Pascal), text editors, disk storage, and even printouts of 
their work, i Remember, that was back in the days when a disk 
system for personal computers was extremely rare, and printers 
cost almost as much as the computer. ) Both provided electronic 
mail delivery between their subscribers, a national bulletin 
board for users, and electronic versions m CB radio that memb- 
ers could use for "on air" (or is it "on computer?") meetings oi 
user groups (The CompuServe Apple user group is one of the 
rnosl famous). 

the original concept behind all of that was to sell the compu- 
ter hobbyist — the forerunner of the personal computerist — 
mainframe computer time and data services at a very attractive 
rate during time periods the computers normally weren't used — 
the off-peak periods. The idea was to make the off-peak rate so 
low that the typical hobbyist would be inclined to use The 
Source or CompuServe, therein producing revenue from the 



computers during those hours. But the personal computer 
explosion or revolution, depending how it appears to you — 
almost instantly eliminated the appeal of programming on those 
services; as a result, their primary use now is as an "informal ion 
database." providing access to many varied information ser- 
vices. 

Both The Source and CompuServe offer many similar in- 
formation services; even then operating prices are similar after 
the initial membership fee. CompuServe is sold (at the lime this 
article was prepared) as part of Radio Shack's videotex package 
lor S^M.'js.-i Mm. OS. impending on whethci you use a computer 
as a smart terminal or are using a dumb terminal. Standard 
service i-- bilk 1 at $5.00 per hour of connect time between 6 pm 
and 5 am local time. Prime lime service from 8 am to 6 pm is 
522.50 an hour. CompuServe assigns a local phone number for 
you to use. If they don't have one in your area you must connect 
through Tymnet; the surcharge for that is $2.00 per hour in the 
contiguous 4H states. CompuServe membership includes I28K 
of disk storage, with additional memory available for a small 
charge. But, the storage must be accessed monthly: you can run 
upchargesjust to keep the disk storage active Main services are 
free, though there are surcharges for stock market quotes, a 
computer buying service, billing details, etc The monthly 
charges can he billed to Visa. MasterCard, or directly billed for 
an extra S3. 00 per statement surcharge. 

Membership in The Source, available through local computer 
•.tores, cost- S 100.00. Connect lime charges are ,S5. 75 pel hour 
during the evening, weekdays and a few holidays, and $4.25 per 
hour midnight to 7 am daily. Prime time (7 am to 6 pm) charges 
are SI 8.00 per hour. The special features that would usually 
require selective surcharges (as with CompuServe), such as 
Stock quotes, legislative reports, and [he like, are rolled into a 
basic package called SOURCJ i PLUS; thai package has I'lal per 
hour conned time fees of $15.00, $10.00, .\\k] $40.00, corre- 
sponding to the bask sen ice hour-,. The user can purchase disk 
storage at prices ranging from S.50 to s 0? per 2K of memory. 



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ding on the total order. (20K and more is i.05-per-2K). 
Tjicre are. however, some additional small monthly charges for 
account maintenance and lor each connect. The Source assignsa 
local access telephone number! usually through the Telenet or 
Tymnet systems, whose cost is included in the basic lees: there 
is no extra charge. 



Is it for you? 

Both The Source and CompuServe arc jam-packed with data- 
base services. Virtually anything you can imagine is available. 
11' you just can't wail to see the news headlines you can get them 
through your computer: The Source has L' PL CompuServe has 
AP. You can even read the syndicated features: The Source will 
teil you this Tuesday what columnist Jack Anderson will say 
next week Need stock market information? Both will give ii in 
you. Want to read what's new in anything.' Popular Science has 
an information service on CompuServe Looking lor financial 
aid for a college student'. 1 Both services claim to provide the 
information. The list of information that's available is almost 
endless. Much of it comes from the information sen. ices of other 
sources, such as the New York Times and other newspapers. 
Value Line (for the stock market's outlook). Diltlcr Bros.. Inc. 
I for llight information), and so on. (There is generally a sur- 
charge for finanical and legislative reports.) Both services fea- 
ture an electronic shopping service called Comp-U-Star. which 
sells goods at discount prices through the personal computer 
The cosl is charged to your credit card. That also has a surcharge 
in the form of a membership fee 

Another popular feature of those services is that you can play 



re 



I 



S 

_J 

LU 

o 

Q 
< 



JtNfLI HUB JACK 



Ydt *rw Jt odd* wUD A computer dealer m o fl** Bl IllacfcJlCfc. oath you 
and th(! dPdrfli* try to Hel the irunripr <nw* on yflur Hnls 4* doit to /! 41 
ptVISlMt wlthmit lalnq Mtf I Bm 1 1- nrj ] , toil W.tl autocue J I ly I mi? i( 
you hust. Mikf n turner for ejth tnand M you Wilt. Ilir> honpit liiuler will 
KitP t njftnUwi tally of yewi-if H i in 1 nq ", T 



To ESftCtit*: "ILftV iHACiMW 

»H* coPlWftBr will H-m MCh harirl tiy prlritin*) 'LfftlitM:'. Typr the anq- 
tau Hull to hit on the nem ha«rt. [j yon Wdnt to stop the qjrtp vyp« 
'fj* ffltr your wjqer h nr depress trip ^HflEW key at -my Hup. 

Reritmber, in the flame of HlacKjack; jLT face: cards count *4 Hi h *« 
Acei can fop worth 1 or 1L painfi « rtM i red , 



Al 1 oT Tn'ir resoar 


S« Should ftp nun&rrs. In a Tei/nfr-Eyite qdtsnon 


a reigns* rtt ' I ' 


jiq<nn« yB3 and a l U' KlQftHlH no. 


SApVU UUTi'Ul 




>PLAT BLACKJACK 




HAGER! S 




1 SH01I 


3 OF HEARTS 


first Mini ts 


J OF HEAR15 


M£IT CMS 15 


7 IJF DlAhTJNGS 


HI IT IES 




INPUT djLn error 




nor 1 




«« caio IS 


3 Mi SPADES 


WITT 1 




KIT URO IS 


JACK IF IHAHINOS 


TOO OUSTTU, Tipjll 


njTAL 15 tt 


HI HOLE Clm IS 


•) Uf SPAMS 


YOU K BEHINO S 5 




RAGER: 5 




1 SHOW 


I OF CUIUS 


FUST CUI) IS 


ODE EH OF CLUBS 


NEXT CASH [S 


ACE UF SPADES 


•"BLACK JAW" 




HT 101 F CARD HAS 


JACK OF HEARTS 


VUU PC AHEAD 5 If. 5 


VAUER: 10 




1 WW 


A OF OIAMQNQS 


F 11151 CMai" 15 


7 OF' VAUI 5 


NETT CARD 15 


; iff cuius 


HIT? 1 




NEXT CARS 1.5 


2 OF 5PAOES 


HIT? 1 




HEAT CASH IS 


3 "F CLKWS 


HIO 1 




MEAT MRU 15 


JACK IIF VAOES 


T'W R'JJFEU . TOUR 


TMTAL 15 /« 


w* pan CASH is 


' HEARTS 



A SAMPLE RUN of Blackjack, one of the many casino-style games avail- 
able on The Source. 



I 



GAMES L1BSART - NO PRINTER RELRJIREO < 



APVENTUSE-ElPl.lJBt COLOSSAL CAVE | SURER GAME! 1!). ..PEAT .OVERTURE 

BACKGAHHO* PLAT SACtuAHHilN 

CASINO 5TVLE 2E. ...PLAT BLACKJACK 

CIVIL HAR SIMULATION AGA51ST THE COMPUTER.... .PLAT CHILWAR 

CHECK CHECKERS CKALLENlit .DATA CMECt 

COIN fllPPtlffi PLAT C0I« 

SWH1T CRAPS. PLAT C«APS 

STATISTICS CONCERNING A PARTICULAR OATE .......... .PLAT HATES 

TIC 1AC 10E IN SI'ANISH PLAT LSTIC 

GET THE FARMER. FOX, CHICCEN, ANO GRAIN ACROSS PLAT FARfltN 

MONDAT NIOWT F001HALL .....PLAT F00T6ALL 

GOLF FOR ONE OR BORE PLATERS PLAT GOLF 

GUESS iHi C0M<'0TLR"5 NUMBER.............. .PLAT GA1ES5 

HANGHAH W5RD GAME PUT HAKHU 

EOTENH ANCIENT SONENTA.. PUT HFMBI 

HORSE RACE GAME .PLAT 'tORSF. 

10 GA1* Uf SKILL.. PLAT I0TE5I 

GCNERH THE 15LW1Q UF SEFATS UETINU PLAT rIWi 

LARGE GAME Of GOLF ...PLAT IGOLF 

LIFE (COLON! GEHEKATION) PLAT IIFE 

LUNAR LANDING SIMULATION PLAT LUN1X 

CCU4PAKIE5 COHPETE 10 SELL A fHOOuCl PLAT MARSET 

HASTEFWIHD PLAT HJHP 

AUCIEHT GAME UF N3H ....PLAT NIM 

MOTHER HIH PLAT HIMJ 

CARE TO TRT TOUR LOCK ON THE SLOT MACHINE?. PLAT UAEAHM 

P[CA-CE*TR[ (HUHBER GOESSIHC GAME) PLAT PICA 

A NEW ADVENTURE GA« fLAT PITS 

RANDOH POETRT PLAT POL TNT 

POKER AGAINST THE IXWV1FP PLAT rtJKEK 

SCORE FOUR ACHNS1 THE COMPUTER PLAT 5CUR1F1HW 

RAHDOH 5HAKE5PERIAH SONNETS ...........PLAT SONNE! 

FILL IN THE NISSIKG LETUBS,, PUT SPELL 

STAR TREK (SUPER VERSION!!!) PEA! -TMK 

PLAT THE STOCK MARKET ....PLAT STOCKS 

ROLE ANCIENT SUHEH1A (A DIFFERENT ONE) PUT iOMER 

TARGET PRACTICE AS KEAfONS OFFICER ON WE EHTEN PRISE. PLAT 1ARGI? 

1IC TAC TOE................. .PLAT TIC1AC10E 

A REGOLAR MSIHO OF GAHES FROM LAS VEGAS PUT VEGAS 

ROULET FOR OP 10 5EYEN PEOPLE PLAT mlEl 

PATRTJL THE CITT STREETS. PLAT WATCHMAN 

HUNT THE htJMPUS ..PLAT WUK?US 

1MTE: 

FOR 1NF0RHAT1ON ON ANT GAME TTPE.......1HF0 (GAMERANE) 

I.E.. IHFO ADVENTURE; TO VIEW A UEMOtSTHATluN UF CEH1A3N 
OF THE WR£ COUPLET GAMES. T'PE DEW? IGAPE'.AME). 



GAMES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION are among the many seruices available 
on The Source and CompuServe. This listing Is from The Source. 



games, or chat through the CB-t) pe simulators. You can have an 
entire lifetime of entertainment through The Source arid Com- 
puServe , 

Now is all of that information and are all of those services 
worthwhile for the non-commercial user'.' We aave both a work- 
out using the services that we thought might appeal to the 
average home user of a personal computer, someone \\ ithtuil a 
business expense account to refund the charges incurred. 

First off, getting anything is slow . Except for special locali- 
ties and a substantial surcharge for 1200 baud service, both 
services run at a top speed of .it)0 baud. Thai might sound fast ii 
you"re trying to follow it on your screen, but it is deadly slow. 
Both systems come up (in an initial menu that directs the user to a 
particular area. In both systems the user can access a .specific 
subject through a sub-menu — usualK a chain of sub-menus (1 
have gone as high as five). The user also can mov e directly to the 
desired page from the main menu if he is familiar « ith the direct 
access cexIcs; those are provided by both services, although it is 
done a lot more clearly by The Source. I'm certain there is 
someone out there who remembers every page of both sen ices 
and can punch up anything in seconds, but there are so many 
codes and so many different access menus, that everything is 
extra slow if you don't use the services frequently. 

Also, the systems are wordy. Almost everything is spelled out 
in great detail, and CompuServe goes in for a lot ol double 
spacing and scroll pauses when the screen fills. It's little bits and 
pieces of time but it adds up to big dollars when spread out over 
thousands of users: it is also frustrating. Accessing Comp-U- 
Star to see what bargains might he available used up 18 minutes 
of connect time, and that's a lot of time and access charge to sec 
what's on "special sale." 

And when we finally did get to the computerized buying 
service, n left something to be desired. For example, we were 
offered a well-known camera with a "standard" lens, un- 
specified electronic flash, gadget bag. and an unknown wide 
angle lens. The lens could he the polished bottom ol a miikbottlc 
for all we know, as no other information is provided. A similar 
offer was made for a Nikon EM camera: The standard package 



132 




plus an unknown electronic Hash lor almost S200. The prices 
might be terrific for the equipment offered, hut precise!} what 
equipment is bciny sold? A list of sewing machines featured 
some remarkably good prices. Bui. I have had many years of 
experience with sewing machines thai don't work when un- 
packed. Do you suddenly become a shipper if the thing doesn't 
work right.' 

Moving along. I looked for some financial aid for a college 
student. Nol one meaningful word on loans or scholarships. 
Instead, a long printoul of" the general statements provided by 
every high school to students and their parents, the same materi- 
al provided by every college to prospective students, and exten- 
sive detail on some special government co-op program that after 
15 minutes of conneel time still hadn't said what the program 
was or which schools or agencies were making the offer. It was 
endless fluff, which is one of the major problems with much of 
the "free" information. Most of it chews up connect time 
without providing anything of substance. There arc long in- 
troductions and special items of news. Even attempting direct 
access usually puts the user in a menu that Hows into another 
menu. 

Since much fanfare had accompanied Popular Science join- 
ing the CompuServe database I figured I'd give that a try. What 
could he better than reading a review of personal computer 
software. In most publications the term "review" means some- 
one actually tried something. I fit's equipment they really turned 
the power on. If it's a computer program I assume someone ran 
it. But what did I get for my money? Fluff there was no user 
report or opinions, just short descriptions that read like they 
came straight from the manufacturer's brochure. The same stuff 
I read in the advertisements in the computer magazines. 

he .something of value for the personal 



>'JH1 II II enlSuf 

EKTBi SiMtliHG f EWDIW IWH - UH WES5 «Etll«N HM IlKJM 



>IOf 4 STWriWi 5TIIBI N0M1IEK - RUM 1 [ THE EM.I151) 

TO Ij (Tut LH1FSTI. 
13 

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SCAN raKHlHJ (Sf] Ifl 5CUI KMMrtun IH07 



13 07-03 03:110 nee- 

(0. qref lean, dlcsiip 4th qraft the trip us _ carter attaces rcaoan taa 
cut) 

tta * StUBTIMi STWH KdtlBEK - HON 1 (THE EMLItil) 

10 13 [IHE 11IEST). 

13 

Ht;.!l f;|.'y.VPIl [N T I HE IKE), BEAU HACKWAlLO H9), 

scii Fiimnutn (sft or sew wiOMan (5»)' 






carter attaccs reaqan taj 



13 01.113 113 :UI1 fled- 
(S qraf lead, nciuin itli nrafi the tell 

cut] 

iirqrnl 

previous x.i % '■ ' nqtnn 

Carter attacks Heaqan tax proposal 

H.y 'ilt EX TMI1HAS 

UP I Irtlfte HOUte Reporter 

LOS nrKClFS tuTE] President Carter today mac led konald Keaqan's 
tajL cut nroposal i* Irresponsible, inflationary and finHBSloi> to carry 
nit without cuttlflfl federal social services. 

For his first niihUc consent on the ta*-reduetlon proposal nide lay 
his urnrrahle Republican qpeoaeftt. for the prestqencr in Havener, the 
nrrsident flew to the fpmer Cali'orma uoreppor's ftwi state. 

He told a rrfltlnn ni iipe national Education Association, which Has 
Strnhqlv wrojrtsd Certeril cantwilqo, that Heaoau's si.i|hested 5JU 
Mil Inn !ii wt "S "a classic fi^e lunch _ sonethinq for nothing,. 

"That tlncl nf hasty offer can onlv nc called oy one word 
irresponsible," the president said. 

"It Is sheer detention to prmlse the African people that we can 
have this rnomomly exoeht*ve and unfair ta* cirt _ that we can 
dranaticil Ir increase defense spendine* and st'l l~namtain social 
proqraps, he said, 

Carter did not nentlon iteaqan tiy naii* hut flff^ secretary Jody 
Lowell nado It clear the orcsidrnt was direction his repacks at tte&qan 
awl other OOP 'ai-tut proponents. 

I'owrl 1 also told reporters Carter has not nade up his own "ind 
aonut a tan cut, nn: has aqreed tq worst with House and Senate deicicrats, 
who want !n nasi thei' man _ lessee _ tei col to ri*el the 5eonhlica" 
propottl- 

barter was net at the airport qy California liow, Eonund Brown Jr., 
a forner rnjl tor the Denocrjric ores f deflt I a 1 noainatlon. Ilrown praised 
Carter's coonerafion with California officials .md s.iin there Is no 
i.ns"ilifv Between the two nen. 

flrfwr. h.is net ennnrsed Easter. Asked whether he wsuld, llrown 
replied: ''n J this nrrtinq ... ;.'s hf>' ilir appropriate fflnn 'nr 
that,* 

'he trin. whith will tw oartly [Mid *or ny the Carter-«san 
Id AU[ PIN SliiEr 13 

hi'e '»' »* ■.' ii r ■•'■ ■■■■••■ • i SOUK" 

Olltl 









GET UP-TO-THE-MINUTE news Stories from the wire services on either 
database, UPI is available on The Source; AP on CompuServe. 




SOFTWARE 




Software 
for the Home 



computer user. How about The Source's airline schedules'.' I was 
about to visit my family in Rochester and a schedule would help. 
The schedule included everything 1 wanted to know about all the 
tlights leaving New York for Rochester, except three things: 
which flights had the special discount fare (there most always is 
one); what were the requirements for the discount, and which 
flights had open seats. 1 had a beautiful prim of the schedule and 
no important information. A three minute call directly to the 800 
number of the airline gave me all the information 1 needed free 
(except for the price ol the toll-free phone call), and in a lot less 
time then it took the computer. Maybe a businessman who flies 
First Class on an expense account might be interested solely in 
what time the plane leaves, but as a family user I'm more 
interested in the important things, like what's the cheapest way 
to fly. and do my children get a discount. That information just 
wasn't in the computer. 

About this time my son came home from school, announced 
he was going on vacation and would buy a used car when he got 
to his destination. What an opportunity to test computerized 
classified ads. Since he w-as headed for Washington, DC, I 
checked the classified ads in the Washington Post. Now that 
worked just great. There I was in New York checking out used 
cars in Washington. DC — a perfect use for a computerized 
information service. 1 punched in the type of car my son wanted, 
how much he had to spend, the equipment he wanted, and wcgot 
a print of cars for him to inquire about when he got to Washing- 
ton. The system worked flaw le-sly and sviih virtually no fluff: it 
went right into the classified ads with a minimum of unusually 
clear instructions — someone did a superb iob w ith this database. 
It was certainly worth the SI .00 or so in computer time. 

flushed with success I figured I'd try the database on how to 
purchase a used car. It was full of the usual platitudes we've 
heard tor years; "Have an expert check the car." "It's someone 
else's problem." and junk like that. It was on such a low level I 
kept expecting a recommendation to kick the tires One would 
figure that if it's worthwhile putting the information on a compu- 
ter there'd be something new and substantial — but no such luck. 

Another area that proved valuable when doing some research 
was the New York Times Consumer Database (NYTCD). which 
consists of ahstraets from the blew York Times and sixty other 
publications. It's undoubtedly valuable for business people 
wanting to do some research on a subject, hut it's also great lor 
students or anyone else needing generalized information. It's 
possible to pick up a story or subject and then trace it backwards 
or forwards to see how il developed. That is another no-fluff 
database that gets right into the meat of things. 

Quite possibly, the NYTCD is a precursor of w hat to expect if 
the Encyclopedia Britannica or the World Hook Encyclopedia 
ever gets on The Source or CompuServe. If that should happen. 
it will be a fantastic breakthrough for young schoolchildren. 
Many will have access to a personal computer, which in turn 
would give them access to most of the information they'll need 
for school through a computerized encyclopedia and a database 






such as the NYTCD. 

Deciding to try something different. I looked into a demon- 
stration of electronic banking. It was rather interesting! Aside 
from the fact there was apparently no hard copy of any 
payments — my records being only what was entered on my disk 
storage — I wondered how many people would get access to my 
entire financial and personal life through electronic banking. In 
this day and age it appears nothing is sacrosanct, and many 
organizations exist lor the sole purpose of selling all the personal 
information they can get their hands on; my state even sells the 
names and addresses of everyone that holds a driver's license. I 
just wonder how long it would lake before all that computerized 
banking information — information on everything I purchased, 
every doctor I visited, every lawyer I paid, every debt I owed — 
was sold to the highest bidder? 

Computing services 

While both The Source and CompuServe are presently con- 
centrating on information, they do offer something else — 
mainframe computer services for personal computer owners. 
Both permit the subscriber to create files of the type used in 
mainframe data processing. For example, on The Source you 
can activate a file automatically each time you sign on. The files 
can be "mailed" to other subscribers, and the electronic mail 
service will even inform you when you sign on that you have 
mail wailing. Your files can be personal or public — that is. you 
can permit anyone to peck at them. 

Of course, if you can create files you must have some way to 
edit them, and an editor is provided. It has more or less standard 
advanced editing features such as "global change," section 
moves, tabulation, sorting, and automatic spelling checking. 

The services also offer a super timesharc BASIC, FOR- 
TRAN, and Pascal. If you're into FORTRAN and Pascal, you 
most likely will end up with more powerful versions than you 



can purchase at reasonable cost tor your personal computer. The 
Source also pro\ ides INFOX, a business database manager that 
can generate special forms. INFOX has its own manuals and 
those can be purchased, it yon wish. Essentially, both The 
Source and CompuServe provide a lot of computing power. If 
you're into sell -development in the programming area (remem- 
ber, we're not covering business here) you probably can't get a 
better dollar value than from The Source and CompuServe. But 
don't expeel to gel off cheap. FORTRAN and Pascal are very 
time consuming when you're first learning. 

I am certain that everyone can find something of value on The 
Source or CompuServe. In the area of computer services it's 
everyone for themselves, only you know how much computer 
power you need or could use. In the area of information, howev- 
er. I feel the most valuable data of any kind was from the 
professionals who have spent years accumulating and dispens- 
ing information in a highly competitive market — newspapers, 
stoek/eommoilit) news services, and the wire services 

For the first few months it's a lot of fun irying oui the varied 
information services of The Source and CompuServe, not to 
mention the assortment of games, but if you have no specific or 
frequent need for "hard information.' ' it's questionable whether 
a permanent commitment or the monthly expense is justified lor 
"just fooling around." 

Obviously, there arc many personal computertsts who find 
The Source and/or CompuServe an important part of their 
lifestyle - especially if they are into user groups of any kind. 
And certainly, for business applications the databases can be 
important tools, but we are talking about personal computing, 
and that means primarily home and family. Before putting any 
money on the line, a logical question to ask is 'After the initial 
fun and excitement, do 1 have any real need for or interest in any 
of the services offered? It's a question everyone must answei fot 
themselves. r-e 



The American series of 

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• MATH I: +, -, ^-, 
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4 levels 
ALL THE ABOVE PROGRAMS 
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^w^ju^ 




Part 3 



THE FIRST TWO PARTS 

of this article dis- 
cussed the theory of operation of the main 
board of the Picture Phone. We'll now 
describe the telephone adaptor board and 
power supply. We'll also begin to look at 
the construct ion of the device. As always, 
it will be helpful to have the previous 
parts of this article as we proceed. 

Telephone adaptor board 

The telephone 
adaptor board, shown 
in Fig. 8, serves two 
purposes: it serves as 
an interface between 
the main board and the 
telephone line, and 
also allows the user to 
switch between voice 
and picture modes. 

Transformer T601 
provides impedance 
matching between the 
main board and the 
telephone line's 600- 
ohm requirements. It 
also provides electric- 
al isolation between 
the phone line and the 
Picture Phone. The 
transformer contains a 
grounded electrostatic 
shield (indicated by 
the dashed line) to re- 
duce hum. Additional 
protection to the 
phone line is provided 
by a static-discharge 
device, DTI . 

It must be noted 
that, while those pre- 
cautions should pro- 
vide sufficient pro- 
tection to satisfy 
your telephone com- 
pany's requirements for connecting 
non-company equipment to its lines, 
the Picture Phone must be used with a 
coupling device approved by the phone 
company. 

The Picture Phone is connected to the 
phone line by a standard four-conductcr 
phone cable terminated in a modular 
phone plug. A modular jack on the rear of 
the Picture Phone cabinet accepts the plug 
from an ordinary telephone. The tele- 
phone can be used normally when the 
Picture Phone is off or when it is in the 
voich mode. Connections between the 
modular jack and the adaptor board arc 
made through an 8-terminal barrier strip. 
TB601. 

The second function of the telephone 
adaptor board is to provide switching be- 
tween voice and picture modes. Two 
relays, RY601 and RY602 provide that 
function. They are controlled by pushbut- 



tons S2 and S3 on the front panel. When 
turned on. the Picture Phone "comes up" 
in the voice mode and the telephone can 
be used normally. When the picture 
switch is depressed, though, several 
things happen. 

First, the telephone is disconnected 
from the line. Usually, that would cause 
the phone company's equipment to 
"think" that you had hung up. and dis- 




The telephone adaptor board, the power supply, and con- 
struction of the device are the topics covered in this month's 
look at the Picture Phone. 



JOSEF BERNARD, 

TECHNICAL EDITOR 

connect you. The Picture Phone, howev- 
er, through relay R601 . provides a "hold- 
ing voltage" which, as far as the phone- 
company equipment is concerned, means 
that (he phone is still off the hook, and the 
connection is maintained. 

With the telephone out of the circuit, 
audio is routed to and from the main board 
of the Picture Phone in the form of a 
slow-scan video signal, composed of 
tones ranging from 1500 Hz to 2300 Hz 
(see Part I), The mode switch, S 1 , in the 
center of the front panel determines 
whether the slow-scan audio will be trans- 
mitted or received. 

When the picture switch is pushed, 
the relays latch, and the Picture Phone 
remains in the picture mode until the 
voice button is pushed. 

Associated with those two switches are 
LED2 and LED3. which indicate the cur- 
rent status of the device. 



Power supply 

The Picture Phone requires five working 
voltages: plus-and-minus five volts DC, 
plus-and-minus 12 volts DC, and —20 
volts DC. The power-supply schematic is 
shown in Fig. 9. While a single transfor- 
mer with two secondaries can be used to 
obtain all those voltages, it may be di- 
fficult to locate; such a transformer is 
available from the supplier indicated in 
the Parts List (see last 
month's issue). 

You may, howev- 
er, choose to use two 
transformers. Both 
should be center- 
tapped. The first 
should be capable of 
supplying about 12.6 
volts on each side of 
the center tap, for a 
total of about 25 volts 
at one amp. The 
second transformer 
should be capable of 
supplying about 6.3 
volts on either side of 
the center tap. for a 
total of 12.6 volts at 
1.5 amps. 

Standard bridge- 
rectifier/capacitor cir- 
cuits are used, along 
with tab-type regula- 
tors to obtain the final 
working voltages. 
The -20 volts is taken 
from the input to the 
-12-volt regulator. A 
0.6 -amp circuit break- 
er, CB1 , is used for 
protection. 

The output of the 

+ 5-volt supply is 

used to drive LED1, 

the power indicator 

mounted on the front panel. 

Front-panel controls 
The functions of some of the front-panel 
controls have already been explained; this 
is what the others do: 

Snatch button (unlabelled). S4, is used 
when you wish to "grab" a frame of 
video to be transmitted. It is active only 
when S5. the manual/automatic 
switch is in the manual position. When 
S5 is in the automatic position, a new 
frame will be snatched automatically ev- 
ery eight seconds. 

The brightness and contrast con- 
trols, R307 and R305. control the quality 
of the image that you arc transmitting, 
(There will be more about them in the 
section on using the Picture Phone.) It is 
assumed that the party with whom you are 
exchanging video is sending a good quali- 
ty picture, so no external controls are 



O 

o 
m 

33 

CO 
00 

135 



Professional Books That Help You Get Ahead-And Stay Ahead! 

jom the Ei ec t ron j GS am i control Engineers' 

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INTUITIVE IC ELECTRONICS: A 
sophisticated Primer for En- 
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T. M, Frederiksen. 208 pp., illus. 
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617/988 Pub. Pr., 535.00 Club Pr., 526.50 

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OPTICAL FIBER SYSTEMS: Tech 

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ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS' HAND- 
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Christiansen, Associate Editor. 2nd 
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209/912 Pub. Pr.. 175,00 Club Pr.. S5T.50 



ELECTRONICS CIRCUITS NOTE 

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RADIO HANDBOOK. By W. Orr. 

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MODERN ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS 
REFERENCE MANUAL. By J. Mar 
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INTRODUCTION TO THE THEORY 
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want to be able to look at a received image 
while discussing it in the voice mode. 

Finally, the function of the receive 
position should be obvious — it loads 
video into the Picture Phone's memory 
for display on your monitor. 

There is one connector on the rear of 
the cabinet that should be explained. That 
is a 25-pin DB25-S socket of the type 
used on computer equipment. It can be 
used for the connection of remote switch- 
es for snatch, voice/picture, etc. 

Construction 

Construction of the Picture Phone can 
be divided into two parts — the three 
boards (main, phone adaptor, and power 
supply)— and chassis wiring. It's prob- 
ably best to complete the first two boards 
first, and then combine the power-supply 
board and chassis wiring. 

Because of the large size and complex- 
ity of the double-sided main board 
(almost 10 x 12 inches) it is impractical 
to reproduce foil patterns for it here with 
clarity. If you want to try to make your 
own board (it's available from the sup- 
plier indicated in the Parts List), f un- 
sized printed (not film) positives can be 
obtained by sending $1 .50 — along with a 
note indicating that you want the foil pat- 
terns for the board and the address to 
which they are to be sent — to: Picture 
Phone, Radio-Electronics, 200 Park 
Avenue South, New York, NY 10003. 

The parts- placement diagram for the 
main board is shown in Fig. 1 0; refer also 
to Fig. 11. Assembly of the board is 
straightforward, and should present little 
difficulty as long as you proceed with 
care. Don't rush the job, for that is sure to 



FIG. 8— TELEPHONE ADAPTOR BOARD pro 
vides switching and impedance-matching tunc 
tions, and also controls status indicators. 



provided for receive adjustments. 

The final control that needs explaining 
is the five-position mode switch. SI. In 
its fully-counterclockwise position. 
gray scale, it loads a four-level gray 
scale into memory for calibration pur- 
poses. The next position, camera, al- 
lows you to view a real-time digitzied 
image from your camera on your monitor. 
That permits both focusing and composi- 
tion, as well as allowing you to set the 
brightness and contrast controls for 
best results. 

The transmit position is used when 
you are in the picture mode to transmit 
the video stored in the Picture Phone's 
memory. The next position, hold freezes 
a frame of received or transmitted video 
in memory and displays it indefinitely. 
regardless of whether new video is avail- 
able or not. It is particularly useful if you 



FIG. 9— POWER SUPPLY provides ±12 volts, 
month's issue) for T1 information. 



1 5 volts, and -20 volts. See text and Parts List (in last 




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FIG. 10— ALL IC'a face in the same direction. Note that resistors and diodes are mounted vertically to 
conserve board space. 



lead to problems, and it will be a long 
time before you solve them and have your 
Picture Phone operating. 

It's best to insert all the IC sockets first 
(note that they all face in the same direc- 
tion) and make sure that you don't insert 
14-pin sockets where there should be 16- 
pin ones. Be sure that all the pins are 
soldered — with that many connections, 
it's easy to miss one, and you'll spend 
hours or days before you discover that one 
unsoldered socket-pin is the reason that 
the equipment isn't functioning. 

Next install the resistors and diodes. 
Note that they are all mounted vertically 
(standing on end). Be extremely careful 
about the polarity of the diodes, and don't 
forget the two short jumpers. Finally, in- 
stall the capacitors, again being careful to 
observe the polarities of the tantalum 
types. Do not insert any IC's into their 
sockets yet. When you're finished with 
the main board, set it aside temporarily 
and go on to the phone adaptor board. 

That double-sided board, whose foil 
patterns are shown in Figs, 1 2 and 13. and 
parts-placement diagram in Fig. 14, is 
easy compared to the main board. The 
parts should slip right into the holes — just 
make sure that the electrolytic capacitor. 



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FIG. 11 — THIS PHOTO shows how the main board should look when it is correctly assembled. It is 
shown here mounted in the enclosure. 



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FIG. 12— FOIL PATTERN tor top of telephone 
adaptor board. 



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FIG. 14 — USE SMALL PC-BOARD pin connectors at positions 1 -1 5 to make it easier to connect wires to 
telephone adaptor board. 



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FIG. 13— FOIL PATTERN lor bottom of tele- 
phone adaptor board. 

C601, is oriented properly, and that the 
8-terminal barrier strip is inserted so that 
the phone wires can be connected from 
the outside of the board. Using small PC- 
board pin-connectors at positions 1-15 
will make it easier to make connections to 
the board later. 

Most of the power supply, shown in 
Fig. 15, can be constructed on a piece of 
perforated construction board: the two 
large capacitors, C3 10 and C312, and the 
four regulators will be chassis-mounted 
and wired to the board. Be sure to allow 
for the many ground connections that will 
have to be made from that board. 

The two off-board capacitors should be 
bracket-mounted to the chassis as shown 
in Fig. 15, and the regulators secured to 
the top side of the bottom of the case. Be 
sure that the tabs of (he. positive regulators 
make good electrical contact with the 
case, and be sure that the negative regula- 
tors are insulated from the case (use nylon 
hardware, mica insulators, and silicone 
grease). 

When the three boards are complete, 
you can install the chassis- mounted com- 




FIG. 15 — POWER SUPPLY and associated components. Bottom of enclosure Is used as heat sink for 
regulators. 



ponents, such as the power transformer, 
switches, jacks. LED's, the two large 
capacitors, etc. It will probably be easier 
not to mount the 36/72-pin edge con- 
nector for the main board at this point, 
because doing so will make it awkward to 
make connections to it. You'll find that 
the liberal use of terminal strips will make 
routing of supply and control voltages 
more convenient. 

Mount the power- supply board in the 



case first, using standoffs, and connect it 
to the two large capacitors and to the 
regulators. Use "spaghetti" on the leads 
of the regulators, as shown in Fig 15, for 
safety. 

When we continue our look at the Pic- 
ture Phone, we will finish up the con- 
struction of the device. We'll also look at 
how it is aligned as well as how it is used. 
Also covered will be how to connect it to 
the phone lines, R-E 



NEW IDEAS 



DMM Add-On 



ON MOST DMM S, THE HIGHEST RESIST- 

ance range is 20 megohms. But if you 
need to read higher resistances you are 
usually out of luck. Here, however, is a 
simple add-on for your DMM that can 
solve that problem. The meter readout 
will have to be converted to read the re- 
sistance, but that's relatively easy to do, 
especially if you have a calculator. 



pp 



tion of it and the meter's input impedance 
is the same 0.5025 megohms. 

In use, the R x terminals are shorted, 
and R2 is adjusted so that the DMM reads 
8 volts when the DMM is switched to the 
appropriate range. Then the short is re- 
moved, the unknown resistance is con- 
nected to those R x terminals, and the 
DMM is switched to the 200-millivolt 



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FIG 

The circuit is shown in Fig. 1 . In it, the 
voltage from 9-volt battery is dropped 
across a voltage divider. Potentiometer 
R2 is adjusted so that the divider's output 
is exactly 8 volts. The odd value of Rl , 
0.5291 megohms, was chosen so that the 
parallel combination of it and the 10- 
megohm input impedance of the DMM 
equals 0.5025 megohms. If that is done, a 
100-megohm resistance will result in a 
midscale reading on your meter (more on 
that later). As Rl is a non-standard value, 
it is formed by connecting either precision 
or selected 200K and 330K resistors in 
series. Note that the input impedance of 
some DMM's is not 10 megohms. If 
yours is one of those, Rl should be re- 
calculated so that the parallel combina- 



-*} 



range. To find the resistance of the un- 
known, simply divide 4000 by the meter 
reading. The result is the resistance in 
megohms, including proper placement of 
the decimal point. That's all there is to it. 

Here are two notes that may come in 
handy: 

When checking leakage resistance of 
large capacitors, be sure that the capaci- 
tors have charged up completely before 
switching to the 200-milllivolt range. 
Otherwise, you'll be subjecting your 
meter to the rather high voltage caused by 
the changing current. Also, for best re- 
sults, wait a few minutes after switching 
on the add-on before adjusting R2. That 
will allow the circuit to stabilize.— Don 
R. King 




jpH 



p. 

'Interference is along network lines and is not the fault of your illegal desaambler' 




NEW IDEAS 

This column is devoted to new ideas, 
circuits, device applications, construc- 
tion techniques, helpful hints, etc. 

All published entries, upon publica- 
tion, will earn $25. In addition. Panavise 
will donate their model 333— The Rapid 
Assembly Circuit Board Holder, having a 
retail price of $39.95. It features an eight- 
position rotating adjustment, indexing at 
45-degree increments, and six positive 
lock positions in the vertical plane, giving 
you a full ten-inch height adjustment for 
comfortable working. (See photo below.) 




I agree to the above terms, and grant 
Radio-Eiectronics Magazine the right 
to publish my idea and to subsequently 
republish my idea in collections or com- 
pilations of reprints of similar articles. I 
declare that the attached idea is my 
own original material and that its publi- 
cation does not violate any other copy- 
right, I also declare that this material 
had not been previously published. 



Title of Idea 



Signature 



Print Name 



Date 



Street 



City 



State 



Zip 



Mail your idea along with this coupon 
to: New Ideas Radio- Electron ics, 
200 park Ave. South, 
Mew York, NY 10003 



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143 



HOBBY CORNER 



And the winner is... 

EARL "DOC" SAVAGE, K4SDS, HOBBY EDITOR 



SEVERAL MONTHS AGO I TOLD YOU ABOUT 

some problems I had trying to help a 
friend build a small audio oscillator into 
an existing device (see the May, 1982 
issue of Radio-Electronics). There was 
very little space and we had to find the 
smallest possible circuit. 

As you may recall, I asked for your 
help and made it into a contest of sorts. 
That "'contest" apparently caught the in- 
terest of many of you, as there were plen- 
ty of responses. To give you an idea of 
how tough the competition was, entries 
came from almost half of the states as well 
as from three countries. 

The circuits themselves have been 
quite fascinating. Most were of expected 
types but a surprising number were un- 
usual (or at least they used approaches 
that had not occurred to me). Many cir- 



cuits used the 3909 LED flasher/ 
oscillator, which indeed makes for a 
small device. 

Also popular were transistor (bipolar 
and unijunction) circuits; all but a few of 
those used designs that eliminated the 
bulky audio transformer usually associ- 
ated with such circuits. And, of course, 
there were a number of circuits using the 
555 timer in an astable configuration. The 
rest of the circuits used less common tech- 
niques, and some were unique. 

I would like to show you all of the 
different designs sent in but space will not 
permit that. Instead, I have included 
several of the circuits in Fig. 1 so that you 
can see some of the approaches used. 

I hope you will try out some of those 
oscillators. Better yet, build and do a bit 
of experimenting with several of them. — 




* £.2~23t' 



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ftps a&&/r/&iviti $ecr->8A>s *>f 
74/32 /# prfjefittet /r 

SPA'/? /AfP^mA'CS /&2AST 



FIG. 2 



■ 22* 



LED 








FIG 



find out how and why they work. If you 
can't do it right now, file the circuits away 
until you can, or at least until you need a 
small oscillator. 

Getting back to the contest, you can 
imagine just how difficult it was to decide 
upon a winner. The one 1 eventually 
chose, shown in Fig. 2. was submitted by 
Peter Lefferts of San Martin, CA; it won 
out because of the unusual nature of the 
design. 

As you can see from the schematic, the 
design certainly does not have the small- 
est parts count. However, as it uses a 
tear-drop-shaped tantalum capacitor, %.- 
watt resistors, and a sub-miniature LED, 
it is a small oscillator. 

Congratulations to you, Peter; your 
"prize" — a box of miscellaneous com- 
ponents (there may even be something in 

AN INVITATION 

To better meet your needs, "Hobby 
Corner" will undergo a change in di- 
rection. It will be changed to a 
question-and-answer form in the near 
future. You are invited to send us 
questions about general electronics 
and its applications. We'll do what we 
can to come up with an answer or. at 
least, suggest where you might find 
one. 

If you need a basic circuit for some 
purpose, or want to know how or why 
one works, let us know. We'll print 
those of greatest interest here In 
"Hobby Comer." Please keep in mind 
that we cannot become a circuit- 
design service for esoteric applica- 
tions; circuits must be as general and 
as simple as possible. Please address 
your correspondence to: 
Hobby Corner 
Radio- Electronics 
200 Park Ave. South 
New York, NY 10003 



there that you can use) — should have 
reached you by the time you read this. 

Many tharjks to all of you who entered 
the contest. My only regret is that every- 
one could not be a winner. 

Another contest? 

Many of you have said that you en- 
joyed working on Hobby Comer contests 
like that last one. I'll see what 1 can come 
up with along that line. In the meantime, 
if you have an idea for something that 
would make an interesting contest, pass 
your thoughts along. 

In fact, it occurs to me that we can have 
a "contest" contest. Let's see who can 
come up with the best idea for a contest. 
This time, I'll let someone else pick the 
winner. Remember that speed may count, 
too (in case more than one of you submits 
the same winning idea, we will have to 
make the final decision on the basis of the 
postmark). And, by the way, please type 
or print your name and address clearly on 
your entry . 

More on weather instruments 

A few months back (November. 1981) 
this column presented information on build- 
ing several types of weather instruments. 
Reader Mike Lozano ( 1 100 Walnut Street, 
Des Moines, 1A 50308) wrote about his 
plans for building a wind vane and an an- 



emometer. Mike is a meterologist and drew 
them up for viewers of his weather broad- 
casts. His plans are detailed and include part 
numbers. If you are interested in building 
these instruments, he will send you copies 
of his plans postpaid upon receipt of S3. 00, 
You might also want to ask him about the 
plans for the rain gauge he is working on. 

Reader requests 

Peter Stutz of Richen. Switzerland is 
looking for a design for an amplifier for 
his frequency counter. He needs sensitiv- 
ity of about 10 mV and a useful frequency 
range of from DC to 14 MHz. 

Jere Welch (APO. NY) would like to 
find a circuit for an underwater pinger and 
surface receiver that could be used for 
marking wrecks. 

Dave Beasley of Parachute, CO is 
wondering if there is any way to convert a 
battery-powered analog quartz clock with 
a 12-hour readout to one that has a 24- 
hour readout. 

From Madera. CA. Richard Roden- 
beck would like to build a programmable 
down-counter to control an irrigation sys- 
tem. What he would like is the one on his 
wife's microwave oven, but she won't let 
him anywhere near it. 

Well, friends, those requests should 
keep you pretty busy until next month. 
See you then. R-E 



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COMMUNICATIONS CORNER 



Reading the mail 

HERB FRIEDMAN, COMMUNICATIONS EDITOR 



OCCASIONALLY THE MORNING MAIL 

brings some unsolicited material that 
screams for attention. Generally, I'll give 
anything a first reading; if it's aimed at the 
SWL, I'll read it twice because there isn't 
much written for SWL's, even though 
there's a lot of interest in shortwave 
listening. Recently, I received some 
booklets (if you can call 178 pages "a 
booklet") from the International DX'ers 
Club of San Diego, and I have yet to work 
my way through them once, even after 
giving them all my time on the morning 
commuter train. 

Those booklets are obviously a labor of 
love from active DX'ers and SWL's, with 
feature articles on all aspects of short- 
wave listening, and reviews of all sorts of 
receivers, antennas, and whatever else 
could be useful for shortwave listening. 
The reviews are best described as ' 'hard 
hitters," calling the shots as they see 
them. 

Not every booklet is as thick; the aver- 
age appears to be about 50 pages — but it's 
a well-packed 50 pages. Sample copies of 
the club's monthly bulletin are only 
SI .00. If you're intoSWL'ing, give your- 
self a treat and try a sample issue. Their 
address is The DX'ers Club of San Diego, 
i 826 Cypress St. , San Diego, C A 92 1 54- 
1151 (Yep! That's a 9-digit zip code). 

Another kind of mail 

Notwithstanding the so-called "lead- 
ing edge of technology," most of the 
digital CW and RTTY "readers" have 
left me singularly unimpressed. The CW 
units could not track a sloppy fist, and 
when the fist was adequate, the readers 
often could not display longer words 
completely. If you've ever used one of 



those you know how difficult it is to fol- 
low what's going on when you can read 
only bits and pieces at a time. As for 
RTTY, I have spent more time trying just 
to tune a reader to a signal than I have 
"reading the mail." Until now the best 
way to copy RTTY — at least for me — 
was with a real TU (Terminal Unit). 

Well, technology has finally caught up 
with CW/RTTY readers in the form of the 
$315.00 Kantronics Mini-Reader. That 
unit is small enough (5 3 /4 x 3 5 /a x 1 '/*) to 
fit it in an oversize shin pocket, even 
though it has a 10-character fiourescent 
readout. Power for the unit ( 1 2- volts DC) 
is supplied by a wall-plug-type adapter. 
Each character readout has 14 segments, 
which allows the display of almost any 
alphanumeric character, including most 
special punctuation characters (although 
for some you need a rather flexible 
imagination). 

Among other features, the unit can 
handle CW speeds of 3 to 80 words-per- 
minute (I think it's actually more precise 
at the higher speeds), RTTY at 60, 66, 
75, and 100 words-per-minute, and stan- 
dard ASCII at 1 10 or 300 baud. In addi- 
tion, it does all RTTY decoding auto- 
matically at any frequency shift. 

That's a lot of features for a shirt 
pocket — even a large one — and, what's 
more amazing, the thing works well. For 
one thing, the 10-character display is 
adequate, allowing a display of one or 
more complete words. The words move 
across the display from right to left. (It's 
amazing the difference two or three extra 
characters makes in "reading" the mes- 
sage.) 

But, what's more important is the way 
the CW and RTTY signals are decoded. 




BANDPASS 
FILTER 



BANDPASS 
FILTER 




AMP 



LOW- 
PASS 

FILTER 



•'. 



ALPHANUMERIC 








MICRO- 
PROCESSOR 


±Ji_ ivCi iu 









-4- 



LED 

TUMPVG 
INDICATOR 




TTL 

CLAMP 



FIG. 1 



Instead of using tricky digital timing- 
circuits, decoding is done by a pre- 
programmed microprocessor that recog- 
nizes character patterns. As the precise 
timing of the signal pulses is less impor- 
tant in this decoding technique, even rea- 
sonably sloppy Fists can be decoded. At 
worst some characters might be lost or 
words might be run together. For RTTY, 
the touch of a button programs the word 
or baud rate. If you are unsure of the rate, 
it can be adjusted while watching the 
readout — -when the displayed message 
becomes intelligible, you've found the 
proper rate. 

Normally . RTTY uses two tones — one 
for the mark and one for the space. Here, 
only one of the tones — the mark tone — is 
used for decoding. What happens is that 
the microprocessor assumes the presence 
of the space when ever the mark is miss- 
ing. That is a common "trick" used in 
RS-232C computer communications 
when only one power-supply polarity is 
available. Normally, the voltage pulses 
that create characters in computer com- 
munications alternate between approx- 
imately + 15- and - 15- volts. But if only 
a -t-15-volt supply is available, some- 
thing must be done to compensate for the 
missing information. What is done is that 
a phantom bit is created — the computer is 
"tricked" into believing the - 1 5- volt 
pulse is there anything the + 15-volt 
pulse is missing. If it sounds confusing 
just imagine my reaction the first time I 
ran across a circuit that worked perfectly 
"with half the pulses missing." 

The advantage of doing that with the 
decoder is that it allows the use of a highly 
selective bandpass filter ahead of the mi- 
croprocessor; that filter screens out much 
of the natural and man-made noise that 
can prevent effective decoding. 

Figure 1 shows how it works. The sig- 
nal from the receiver's speaker or head- 
phone output is bridged into an op- 
erational amplifier. From there, it is fed 
into two feedback bandpass filters and 
then into yet another amplifier that serves 
as a waveform shaper. The output of the 
shaper feeds through a low pass filter and 
on to a clamp that provides a pulse wave- 
form at TTL levels for the micro- 
processor. 

An LED in the clamp circuit serves as a 
tuning indicator. Normally, the LED is 
out when no signal flows to the clamp. 



146 



This Publication 
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BUt, when the received signal is tuned so 
that the heterodyne tone falls within the 
decoder's passband, signal flow to the 
clamp begins. The increase in the clamp's 
collector current causes current to flow 
through the LED — the more current that 
reaches the clamp, the brighter the LED. 
To tune a signal, the user first adjusts the 
receiver tuning or BFO for maximum 
LED brilliance, and then adjusts the tun- 
ing until the display shows legible copy. 
It's not the easiest tuning system — but it's 
inexpensive; eventually you will be able 
to tune the thing easily by just listening to 
the pitch of the received tone. 

Kantronics sends out a nice package of 
information on the Mini-Reader. It's 
available from Kantronics, 1202 E. 23rd 
St., Lawrence, KS 66044. R-E 




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STATE OF SOLID STATE 



A new high-power op-amp 

ROBERT F. SCOTT, SEMICONDUCTOR EDITOR 



o 

UJ 



o 
□ 
< 

148 



I HAVE WONDERED, AND 1 SUPPOSE YOU 

have also, about the performance and the 
circuitry involved in those LSI audio- 
power amplifiers that are offered by a 
number of mail-order electronics supply 
houses. I haven't been able to come up 
with any technical data on those devices 
but was fortunate in running across an 
application note on a new and interesting 
device from National Semiconductor. It 
is the LH0101 low-distortion high-power 
wideband operational amplifier designed 
to deliver a high current into a variety of 
loads. It is conservatively rated at 2 amps 
with negligible crossover (zero-crossing) 
distortion. Frequency response is from 
DC to above 4 MHz. It is in a hermetically 
sealed TO-3 package. Table I shows the 
typical performance characteristics at 
25°C ambient and a + 15-volt supply. 

The LH0101, shown schematically in 
Fig. 1, has three basic sections: an op- 
amp, buffer amplifier, and power ampli- 
fier. The op- amp uses a BI-FET con- 
figuration to take full advantage of the 
superior DC performance offered by the 



TABLE 1 


Parameter 




Conditions 


Value 


Output current 






2A 


Input offset voltage 






5m V 


Input bias current 






50pA 


Input offset current 






25pA 


Input resistance 






1G ,2 Q 


Large signal voltage 








gain 






2Q0V/mV 


Output voltage swing 


Hl 


= 100Q 


* 12.5V 




R, 


= irjfi 


1 11.6V 




R, 


= 5.0Q 


±11V 


Slew rate 


Ay 


= +1 


10V, >s 


Full power bandwidth 


A v 


= + 1,R L = 10O 


300kHz 


Small signal rise time 


A v 


= +i,r l = ion 


100 NS 


Small signal setting 








time to 0.01 % 


V,K 


= 10V. A v = +1 


2^s 


Gain bandwidth 






4 MHz 


Harmonic distortion 


f = 


1kHz, P = 1W 


0.005% 




R, 


= 10H, A v = +1 






f = 


20kHz, P = 1W 


0.05% 




Rl 


= 10Q, A v = +1 





FET input and the desirable slew rate, 
settling time, and low bias-current char- 
acteristics of this type of device. In addi- 




tion, the internal frequency compensation 
makes the Bl-FET an ideal around which 
to design a power amplifier. 

Most power amplifiers designed for 
high-current output over a wide frequen- 
cy range are either designed for Class AB 
or Class B operation. Both of those de- 
signs have a tendency to produce crossov- 
er distortion. For minimum crossover dis- 
tortion, a power amplifier must maintain 
a low output impedance throughout zero- 
crossing. To do that, the push-pull output 
transistors must smoothly drive the load, 
alternately switching current-sinking and 
current-sourcing duties at the crossover 
point. 

In a Class-8 configuration, both output 
transistors are completely cut off at the 
crossover point. Thus, output impedance 
is relatively high and crossover distortion 
is severe. In a Class- AB design, both 
output transistors are biased on during 
no-load conditions, thus providing a low 
output resistance and thereby eliminating 
crossover distortion. 

However, in a Class- A B design, cros- 
sover distortion can develop with high- 
level input signals. For example, when 
the input-signal voltage causes full output 
current to be delivered to the load, the 
increased base-emitter voltage of the 
driving transistor tends to bias the resting 
transistor off. Now, when the input signal 
reverses polarity, so that the output 
swings negative, the amount of crossover 
continued on page 156 



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149 



SERVICE CLINIC 



Derating components for longer life 



JACK DARR, SERVICE EDITOR 



HOW MANY TIMES HAS THIS HAPPENED TO 

you? You change a shorted power transis- 
tor, operate the set long enough to be 
certain that everything is OK, and finally 
close up the back of the set. And in about 
a week the set is out again — only this ti me 
the new transistor has shorted. What goes 
on here? After all , you had used an exact- 
duplicate replacement. 

Actually, there are several things that 
could have caused that. But among those 
is the possibility that the original transis- 
tor might not have been derated enough to 
hold up. 

What does "derated" mean? The 
shortest definition for "derated" is 
"safety factor," When you find a power 
transistor shorted, check the applied DC 
voltage, and. after replacement, the cur- 
rent it's drawing. That is often shown on 
the schematic, which is a big help. Or, if 
the original is an EIA-type number (un- 
likely!) you can check for its breakdown- 
voltage and collector-current rating. Too 
many sets these days seem to be driving 
the power transistors almost up to the 
limit of their ratings; there is practically 
no safety factor allowed for surges, etc., 
which are always with us. Unlike tubes, 
transistors are very intolerant of surges. 

So, what's the cure? Look up the ori- 
ginal type in one of the many transistor 
guides and handbooks. Note its collector 
breakdown-voltage and maximum col- 
lector-current rating. Now, to increase 
the derating, go and look for another tran- 
sistor of the same type, case, etc., but 
with a higher breakdown-voltage and col- 
lector-current rating. If the original had 
an 800- volt breakdown- voltage and a 2- 
amp collector-current rating, pick one 
with at least a 1200- or 1500-volt break- 
down-voltage rating, and as high a col- 
lector-current rating as you can get. Some 
go up to as high as 20 amps , and that extra 
current-carrying ability is very useful. 
You've now derated the new transistor as 
much as possible to give it an extra mar- 
gin of safety to deal with any surges or 
momentary overloads — those may have 
been what was killing the original transis- 
tors. 

After the leplacement, be sure to check 
for correct bias, drive signal, idling cur- 
rent, and so on. Check the current actual- 
ly drawn in operation, and make sure that 
it is well within limits. Also — and this is 
very important — ran it for a while and 



then check the transistor's case tempera- 
ture. Make sure that the screws are tight 
and that enough silicone grease was used. 
If it runs too hot, but other things seem to 
be fine, you may have to add more heat- 
sinking. That can be done in any of sever- 
al ways. If you can't find any other way, 
bend a small piece of sheet aluminum into 
a "U" shape, and cement it to the top of 
the case as shown in Fig. 1 , Make sure, of 
course, that it doesn't touch anything that 
could short it to ground. 




EP0XY 

TRANSISTOH 

CASE 



FIG. 1 

Derating isn't limited to transistors; it 
applies to everything else in the set as 
well. If you find that a filter capacitor 
rated at 1 6 volts is always shorting, re- 
place it with one rated at least a 25 volts — 
or better still, one rated at 50 volts. Doing 
that will give you much lower leakage and 
more ability to withstand surges. In some 
of the older sets, we were always finding 
that the coupling capacitor was leaky, 
causing distortion in the audio. Many of 
those were rated at only 400 volts; for 
replacement, we always used ones rated 
at 600 volts — with those there was far less 
leakage. (I once asked an engineer for one 
of the set manufacturers why capacitors 
rated at 600 .volts weren't used. He said 
that they cost eight cents more, and, while 
they may not sound like much for one set. 
when you consider thousands of sets it 
begins to add up. Frankly, it still does not 
make much sense to me, but I guess that's 
the way they have to look at those kinds of 
things.) 

Resistors should also be derated if they 
seem to fail too soon . The cure for that is 
to find out why the current is so high, and 
correct the problem. For luck, it won't 
hurt to increase the power rating of the 
resistor to make it a bit less likely to fail 
again. For instance, '/i-watt resistors can 
be replaced by '/i-watt units and '/--watt 



ones can be replaced by resistors rated at 1 
or even 2 watts, if space permits. 

Let's look at one final thing before we 
finish up for this month. I get a lot of 
letters asking about power transformers 
for small import stereos, tape decks, etc. 
Often, there is just no service data avail- 
able for those devices. It's easy enough to 
guess the voltage rating for those trans- 
formers; check the filter capacitors — if 
those are rated at 16 or even 25 volts, the 
chances are that the transformer's secon- 
dary was 12 volts. But what about the 
current rating? 

Here's how to find out: Replace the 
unit's power-supply circuitry with a vari- 
able DC power-supply. Hook a DC volt- 
meter across the supply and a DC am- 
meter in series with it. Slowly bring up 
the power until the device begins to work. 
Note the voltage and current readings. 
Then turn the volume all the way up to 
find the maximum current. If that is 1.3 
amps, for example, choose a transformer 
with at least a 2-amp rating to make cer- 
tain that it can stand up. There you have 
it — the only possible problem here is 
physical size; be sure to check on how 
much space is available before obtaining 
a replacement. R-E 

SERVICE 
QUESTIONS 

WEAK SOUND 

1 wrote you a while back about weak 
sound on this Katone 2100. You gave me 
some things to try and I did. Fed a signal 
to the volume control and traced it 
through the circuit with a scope. What I 
found was a defective transistor in the 
audio output. Replaced it and everything 
now works fine — thanks! — Clement 
Guitbauli, Deny, NH 

MISSING 3.58-MHz SIGNAL 

Here's one that I ran into on my own 
bench a while back. The raster was good, 
but the picture had a pale greenish tint. 
There was no color in the picture. Tracing 
through the color stages, I found that 
there was no 3.58-MHz signal. The color 
bars were getting through fine. The burst 
signal was at the input to the crystal, but 



150 



not at the output. This circuit uses the 
crystal as a narrow bandpass "filter." So 
if the crystal is bad, there is no burst and 
no 3.58-MHz signal. There is no oscilla- 
tor in this circuit; the burst itself is ampli- 
fied to provide the reference signal. One 
caution here: Don't use a stock oscillator 
crystal in this type of circuit — only crys- 
tals cut for that application will do. 

HOT FLYBACK 

The main problem in this Sanyo 91 C4 1 
seemed to be a very hot flyback. You've 
always said "Check everything else, and 
if they are OK, it's the flyback." Well, 
everything else did check out OK, so I got 
my courage up and ordered a new one. 
Once that was put in every thing worked 
fine. — David Daniel, Bin bank, CA 

MISSING CAPACITOR 

This Sylvania EO-5 was continuously 
blowing output transistors; I think I final- 
ly tracked down the reason why. I found 
that R448 (3300 ohms, 1 watt) on the 
driver collector had burned up. I also 
noticed that C437, a .0047mF capacitor 
that was supposed to be between the base 
of the horizontal output and the emitter 
was missing. In fact, it appeared that it 
had never been there to begin with. Any- 
how, I put one in and applied power using 
a Variac. Things are going much better 



now — everything works including the 
+ 120- volt DC supply. The set has been 
going for several hours and none of the 
readings have changed. — John Ward, 
Mishawaka, IN 

VERTICAL LINES 

The vertical lines in the picture of this 
Sears 562/10121 show a distinct bend. 
That bend slowly moves up the picture 
from the bottom to the top. What is going 
on here?—D.G., Green Valley, AZ 

Well, I can't tell you exactly where the 
problem is, but I can tell what is causing 
it. What you are seeing is 60-Hz ripple 
that is getting into either the horizontal 
oscillator or the AFC. That causes a slight 
phase shift — just enough to make the ver- 
tical lines bend. To find the problem, use 
a scope on the DC power-supply and look 
for any sign of 60-Hz rippie. Keep the 
vertical gain of your scope high to spot 
any small ripple voltages. 

PLASTIC CASE TRANSISTORS 

A big problem with heating plastic- 
cased transistors to find intennittents is 
that the cases tend to melt. To avoid that 
problem, place a piece of mica insulation 
between the tip of your soldering iron and 
the case. That will let you heat the transis- 
tor, but keep the case from melting— 
Gene Corn, Greenville, SC R-E 



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TRANSCEIVER, model TS-930S, is all solid 
state, designed to cover all amateur bands 
from 160 through 10 meters; it also in- 
corporates a 150 kHz to 30 MHz general- 
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model TS-930S is a built-in automatic an- 




CIRCLE 141 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

tenna tuner. There are also full break-in, dual 
digital VFO's, 8 memory channels, dual- 
mode noise blanker, IF notch filter, fluores- 
cent tube display, RF-type speech processor, 
RF step attenuator, 100 kHz marker, and 
voice-controlled operation. Special circuitry 
is also incorporated that allows operator 



adjustment of the IF passband characteris- 
tics for best rejection of interfering signals, as 
well as a tunable audio filter for CW rejection. 
Power input is 250-watts PEP SSB, CW, and 
FSK, and at 80-watts on AM. The built-in 
power supply operates on 1 20-. 220-, or 240- 
volts AC only. 

The model TS-930S is priced at 
$1 799.00.— Trio-Kenwood Com- 
munications, Inc., 1111 West Walnut 
Street, Compton, CA 90220. 

STANDBY POWER SYSTEM, model 
SPS0200, provides 200 watts of emergency 
electrical power at 120 volts for 20 minutes 
and takes over the job of power supply auto- 
matically within one cycle of power failure. Its 
key applications are for business and per- 
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traps and eliminates dangerous "spikes" in 
current during normal usage. 

The model SPS0200 is plugged into a pow- 
er outlet and the computer devices, including 
mainframe, terminal, and other pe- 
ripherals are plugged in the SPS, As long as 
the power is constant into the SPS, the cur- 
rent passes through to the computer. Howev- 
er, if power drops below 1 02 volts, a sensing 
device immediately switches to output from 
its internal battery and a red indicator light 
warns the user what has happened. Since 
most small computers will not notice a power 
failure for approximately 3 cycles, the SPS 
inverter will be in action long before the com- 
puter knows that anything is amiss in the 
line- power supply. 

The battery inverter will deliver 200 watts at 
1 20 volts for 20 minutes under maximum load 
conditions, which should give a computer 
user ample time to get off the machine in 
orderly fashion without the loss of a single 
byte of data. If the power outage is brief, or is 
only a "brownout", with power returning to 



normal in a few seconds, the device wil I auto- 
matically transfer back to line power, and the 
integral regulated recharger will restore the 
battery to full power. 

The model SPS0200 is priced at $489.00. 
A more powerful model, the model SPS04Q0, 
rated at 400 VA for 1 minutes, is priced at 
$689.00.— Gould, Inc., Portable Battery Di- 
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CLEANERS, model VCR 130 (VHS format, 
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are non-abrasive, wet-system cleaners that 
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path. Each unit comes with a 2-ounce can of 
Nortronics Video Spray Cleaner in a package 
that lists the advantages of the Nortronics 
drop-in system. The model VCR 130 and the 
model VCR 135 have the same price: $30.00 
each.— Recorder Care, Nortronics Com- 
pany, Inc., 8101 Tenth Avenue North, Min- 
neapolis, MN 55427. 

AUDIO FUNCTION GENERATOR, model 
1 00, provides a precise frequency from 1 00.0 
Hz to 100 kHz in three decade ranges. There 
is fully synthesized frequency selection to 
four significant digits throughout the frequen- 




panel thumbwheel switches. Two separate 
outputs are provided, one fixed at TTL levels 
for triggering or sync capability and one con- 
tinuously variable from 0-volt to 8-volts P-P 
into a 50-ohm load or 0-volt to 1 5-volts P-P 
into a 600-ohm load, in all modes. The TTL 
output is asquarewave capable of driving two 
standard TTL loads. 

The model 100 is priced at $252.00.— HF 
Signalling, Inc., PO Box 17510, Kansas 
City, MO 64130. 

COMMUNICATIONS TEST-SET. the model 
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CIRCLE 144 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

cy range of the audio/function generator in all 
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0,05 PPM oven oscillator, plus high- 
resolution frequency- error meter (simulcast 
paging); 10 Hz to 9999,9 Hz variable audio 
generator, plus, audio-frequency error meter; 
internal rechargeable battery (2-hour battery 
operation); +10 dB high-output amplifier; 
microphone, and telescopic antenna. 

The model FM/AM-500 is priced at 
$4995.00— IFR, Inc., 10200 West York 
Street, Wichita, KS 67215. 

INTERFACE BOARD, model AiO-li, is de- 
signed for the Apple II and provides a highly 
flexible, full-function serial/parallel interface 
that virtually eliminates the need for any other 
I/O boards by combining two boards into one 
compact unit. 




The package includes manual, jumpers, 
and wiring information to support a wide vari- 
ety of printers, including Epson, Anadex, 
Centronics, IDS, Okidata, NEC, Diablo, 
Qume, and more. The model AIO-II is priced 
at $225.00.— SSM Microcomputer Pro- 
ducts, Inc., 2190 Paragon Drive, San Jose, 
CA 95131. 

SATELLITE-TV RECEIVER, the Sky Eye IV, 
uses the latest single-conversion electronics 
to deliver video and audio. An easy-to-read 
slide-rule dial and "center tune" LED make 
accurate, drift-free tuning simple. Audio tun- 
ing is frequency-agile, 5.5-7.5 MHz, for 
obtaining optimum sound or seeking audio- 
only programming. Other features include 
video- polarity control, AFC defeat, and LED 
signal -strength bar. The remote downconver- 
ter unit mounts at the dish, and is packaged in 



CIRCLE 146 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

The model AIO-II can perform four in- 
dependent interface functions, including se- 
rial modem, serial terminal/printer, parallel 
Centronics-compatible printer, and a 
general-purpose parallel port. It permits 
simultaneous output to both one serial and 
one parallel device using the Apple control 
code protocois. There is no need for "phan- 
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CIRCLE 147 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

a weather-sealed case. The Sky Eye IV is 
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THe recommended price of the Sky Eye IV 
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Put Professional Knowledge and a 

COLLEGE DEGREE 

in your Electronics Career through 

HOME 
STUDY 




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DEGREE 

No commuting to class. Study at your 
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In the Grantham electronics program, 
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then your B.S.E.T. These degrees are ac- 
credited by the Accrediting Commission 
of the National Home Study Council. 

Out free bulletin gives full details of 
the home-study program, the degrees 
awarded, and the requirements for each 
degree. Write for Bulletin R-82. 
Grantham College of Engineering 
2500 So. LaCienega Blvd. 

Los Angeles, California 90034 



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1-800-621-4627 



$K precision 



156 



' DYNASCAN 
CORPORATION 



6460 West Cortland Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60635 • 312/809-9087 

Intl. 513.. MM W, Cortland SI.. Cmic.tjo. It £0&3S 
Canadian S*1m: Atlas Electronics. Ontirlo 

CIRCLE 39 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



STATE OF SOLID STATE 



continued from page 148 



distortion, if any, depends on how fast the 
resting transistor can turn on and assume 
its share of duty cycie. The condition 
worsens as the frequency of the input 
signal increases. 

The output stage of the LH0101 com- 
bines both Class B and Class AB designs 
to achieve smooth distortion-free switch- 
ing at the crossover point. 

ThebufferstageoftheLHOlOl (Fig. 1) 
is a unity-gain current amplifier consist- 
ing of transistors Q3-Q 1 1 and Q5 and 
QIC, Operating in the Class AB mode, 
what the buffer does is to provide dis- 
tortion-free drive during the zero cross- 
ing. Bandwidth extends beyond 50 MHz 
to eliminate the possibility of bandwidth- 
induced distortion. 

FET's Q7 and Q8 limit the buffer-stage 
output current to 50 mA. However, the 
output stage, consisting of Darlington 
transistors Ql and Q2, is set up so that 
both transistors turn on as the output- load 
current reaches 25 mA. Under operating 
conditions, the buffer drives the load at 
currents up to 25 mA. Above that point, 
the output stage takes over, delivering 
power up to the rated output limit. Thus, 
the power-driving ability of the buffer 
stage is used to "smooth" the turn-on 
delay of the output stage and eliminate 
crossover distortion. 

Transistors Q6 and Q9 are in the circuit 
to prevent the output stage from being 
over-driven. Current- sensing resistors 
(R sc ) may be connected between the 
supply and sc terminals to set the limiting 
level. A drop of approximately 0.6- volt 
across a sensing resistor turns on either 
Q6 or Q9. That in turn, turns on Q12 or 
Q4, respectively, to prevent excess base 
current from driving the output stage be- 
yond the design limit. Current-sensing 
resistors R sc = 0.6/I sc - When I sc = 2 
amps, R sc = 0.3 ohms. 

Low distortion 40-watt power amp 

Figure 2 shows how two LH0101 's can 
be used in a bridge configuration to obtain 
maximum available power output from a 
specified supply voltage. Amplifier dis- 
tortion curves are shown in Fig. 3. A slew 
rate of 10 volts-per-MS extends the full- 
power bandwidth to beyond 100 kHz. 

Application precautions 

In this and other high-current high- 
power amplifiers, particular attention 
must be given to ground connections and 
the length and diameter of PC traces 
carrying high currents. Keep them short 
to minimize the development of error vol- 
tages. Figure 4 shows a suitable method 
of circuit grounding. The heavy lines 
represent paths or traces carrying high 
currents. 



INPUT 



OUTPUT 




0.1517, ZW 

5K 

15K 



CURRENT LIMIT 
RESISTOR 

FEEDBACK 
RESISTOR 

FEEDBACK 
RESISTOR 

R7-R1Q INPUT RESISTORS TDK 

BYPASS 47fif, 25V 

CAPACITORS ELECTROLYTIC 

BYPASS tOfiF, 25V 

CAPACIT0HS TANTALUM 

CImF, 25V 

CERAMIC 



R1R4 
RB 

R6 



C1-C4 
C5CB 



po.ni BYPASS 
U ^ UU CAPACITORS 



FIG. 2 




0.001 



10 100 IK 10K 100K 

FREQUENCY -Hz 

FIG. 3 

The importance of minimizing error 
voltages can be seen as we examine the 
current-sensing circuitry in the amplifier 
in Fig. 2. The current-sensing resistors 
are Rl, R2, R3, and R4; 0.15-ohm, 2- 
watt units that develop the 0.6-volt 
needed to trigger the current-limiting cir- 
cuit. A PC trace with a resistance of only 
10 milliohm (0.01 ohm) carrying 2 amps 
will develop a 20-mV error voltage. Add 




FIG. 4 

to that the possible error voltages that may 
develop across the 5-milliohm resistance 
of a good solder joint and the 10-milliohm 
resistance of a socket contact. 

A heat sink is a must to keep the 
LHOlQl's operating temperature within a 
safe range. It should have a thermal resist- 
ance of 3. 5 °C- per- watt ambient. A typ- 
ical heat sink, with that rating, and suitable 
for a TO-3 device package, is the Ther- 
malloy 6141. It should be mounted with a 
mica insulator and a liberal application of 
a thermal -contact fluid or silicone grease. 

Other applications 

The LH0101 is ideally suited for serv- 
ice as a programmable current source, 
coaxial cable driver, CRT yoke driver. 



and a driver for inductive loads. For in- 
formation on adapting the device to those 
applications, refer to Application Note 
AN-261 — Low-Distortion Wideband 
Power Op Amp and LHOWl Power Op- 
erational Amplifer Data Sheet available 
from National Semiconductor, 2900 
Semiconductor Drive, Santa Clara, CA 
95051. 

Divide-by-four-prescaler 

The RCA CA3199E divide-by-four 
pre scaler takes signals in the VHF/UHF 
band (up to 1 .3 GHz) and reduces them to 
low -frequency logic levels. The device's 
high sensitivity eliminates the need for 
preamplification in most cases. Applica- 
tions include digital frequency synthesis 
in VHF/UHF receivers, frequency stan- 
dards, and as high-frequency dividers in 
UHF timers and counters. 

Accepting either single- or double- 
ended AC-coupled input signals, the 
CA3 199E provides complementary emit- 
ter-follower outputs at standard ECL 
levels. With unloaded outputs, the typical 
logic 1 level is 4.2 volts while the logic 
is 3.4 volts. The device operates from 5 
±0.5 volts. The nominal input signal is a 
100 mV sinusoidal waveform in the range 
of 100 MHz to 1000 MHz; the maximum 
RMS input voltage is 0.5 volt. 

Transition time of logic output is 0.6 ns 
for both risetime and falltime. In an 8-pin 
mini-DIP, the device is $2.79 at the 100- 



piece level.— RCA Solid State Div. , Box 
3200, Somcrville, NJ 08876. 

Video Generator 

Solid State Scientific has introduced 
the SND video generator that includes 
such desirable features as reverse video, 
underline, strikethrough, and character 
blink. It operates with the company's 
SND5037 CRT timer/controiler to pro- 
vide the display functions required of a 
video display terminal. The device has an 
expandable character set, video shift 
register, four character and graphics 
modes, and two programmable blink 
rates. The 28-pin device operates from a 
5- volt supply, the price is $15.95 in lots 
of 100.— Solid- State Scientific, Inc., 
Montgomery vi lie, PA 18936. 

Microminiature infrared LED 

Motorola expands its line of infrared 
LED's with the addition of the MLED15 
in a tiny clear plastic housing only 0,092 
inch in diameter and 0.058 inch high. It 
has an output of 1 . 3 mW at a forward peak 
current of 30 mA, The peak emission 
wavelength is 930 nanometers so the 
MLED15 is physically and spectrally 
matched to the MRD150 phototransistor 
detector for use in interrupter modules 
and reflective couplers. The price is 
$2.00 in 1-99 quantities. — Motorola 
Semiconductor Products Inc., PO Box 
20912, Phoenix, AZ 80536. R-E 




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Pollution, 

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Isolated 3-prong sockets; integral Spike/ 
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ISO-1 ISOLATOR. 3 Isolated Sockets; 
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Technical & Nort BOO t 617-655 1532 



CIRCLE 41 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



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The FM-2400CH provides an accurate fre- 
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The FM-2400CH with its extended range cov- 
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The frequencies can be those of the radio fre- 
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Frequency stability with built-in thermometer 
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RF crystals (with temp. 

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CIRCLE 50 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



v; 






CIHCLE 42 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



O 

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157 



Vital protection 
for PC Boards 




Be safe. Desolder PC components 
with Endeco irons. Get proper HEAT 
TO MELT and strong VACUUM 
ACTION TO LIFT solder and cool 
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without damage 

These PC components replaced fast 
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il#tfiT I ft 

Endeco professional features include 
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Contact your distributor for Endeco 
desoldering and soldering irons, kits 
and equipment — or write us today. 

Enterprise Development Corp. 

5127 East 65th Street 
Indianapolis. IN 46220 
Phone: (317) 251-1231 



CIRCLE 46 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



NEW BOOKS 



For more details use the free information card 
inside the back cover. 



TESLA— MAN OUT OF TIME, by Margaret 
Cheney, Prentice-HafI, Inc., Englewood 
Cliffs, NJ 07632, 320 pages, including In- 
dex, 6x9 inches, hard cover. $16.95. 

Nikola Tesla was probably the greatest of 
all' American inventors. His alternating- 
current system, developed by a mind that 
couid "see" the electric fields in space and 
thereby the rotating electromagnetic field, is 
the foundation of our modern civilization. His 
radio-frequency oscillation transformer (Tes- 
la coil) was invented in 1891, and he demon- 
strated radio transmission and reception in 
1893. In 1899 he demonstrated a radio- 
controlled boat in Madison Square Garden. In 
the same year, in his Colorado Springs lab- 
oratory, he produced electric discharges of 
over 12 million volts. His more than 900 pat- 
ents range from therapeutics to mechanical 
engines. 

Yet Tesla is practically unknown today. 
Why? The consensus seems to be that it was 
because he was a "loner" and built up no 
organization to carry on his raame as well as 
his work, whereas the Marconi and Edison 



companies had and have a vested interest in 
promoting the name of their founders. 

Mrs. Cheney has done much to correct the 
impression of strangeness and alienation. 
She presents a Tesla quite different from the 
one we have seen in earlier works. Instead of 
a detached being, with no interest in com- 
mercial affairs, Tesla emerges as a person 
with very real worries, trying to find ways 
around his financial problems. His social life 
is well covered, and his non-technical writ- 
ings (poetry and biographies of Yugoslavs he 
admired) are cited. 

Mrs. Cheney's research appears to have 
been fantastic. She finds no evidence for the 
famous "$1 million cash and $1 per horse- 
power royalty" George Westinghouse is sup- 
posed to have offered him. Westinghouse 
records, Mrs. Cheney says, indicate that Tes- 
la was paid $60,000 for his 40 patents. The 
royalty was, however, $2,50 per horsepower 
instead of $1 . That led to the confrontation in 
which Tesla tore up his contract. He was paid 
$216,000 at that time, in lieu of royalties. 

The Tesla-Edison Nobel-prize story is 



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CIRCLE 40 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



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CIRCLE 37 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




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equally in dispute, and Cheney is not sure 
that the facts were ever brought out, Another 
interesting story is that of the 200 lamps lit 26 
miles away from his Colorado station. Teste's 
notes, Cheney says, contain no mention of 
that feat. 

In discussing Tesla's achievements, she 
goes into details that have not been made 
clear previously. Describing his robot boat of 
1899, she points out that the remote radio 
control could be activated only by the simulta- 
neous reception of two or more waves at 
different frequencies, rendering it invulner- 
able to outside jamming or interference. 

She devotes a chapter to "The Great Radio 
Controversy" between Tesla and Marconi, 
resolved in Marconi's favor in 1915, but re- 
versed by the Supreme Court in 1 943 (after 
Tesla's death) with full acknowledgment that 
"Tesla had anticipated all others with his fun- 
damental radio patents." 

The Tesla turbine is covered in much great- 
er detail than heretofore. The original mod- 
el — about the size of a derby hat — weighed 
1 pounds and produced 30 horsepower. It is 
still not certain whether it can be mass- 
produced practically with state-of-the-art 
materiais. She also goes deeply into what 
happened to the "missing papers" in Tesla's 
safe after his death, devoting a full chapter to 
the subject. 

With her diligent investigation into matters 
about which other authors have simply used 
the last writer's information without verifica- 
tion, or skimmed over, or overlooked entirely, 
combined with her sympathetic presentation 
of Tesla as a human being, Mrs. Cheney, and 
her book, have made an important contribu- 
tion to the history of science. 

CIRCLE 151 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

PRACTICAL TV TROUBLESHOOTING US- 
ING A VIDEO ANALYZER, by Robert L. 
Goodman. TAB Books, Blue Ridge Sum- 
mit, PA 17214. 308 pages including appen- 
dix and index; 5Va x 8Vi inches; hard- 
cover; $18.95. 

The video service technician has always 
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Sencore model VA48 TV-VTR-MATV and 
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other time-saving features for the video tech- 
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This book is a troubleshooter's manual, 



relating to the model VA48, combining all 
information from technical articles, instruc- 
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in the Sencore news on the model VA48 for 
the past few years. The reader has at his 
fingertips all of the test and troubleshooting 
procedures for the Sencore Video Analyzer. 
The book is fully illustrated with photographs 
and diagrams. 

CIRCLE 152 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 

FIFTY BASIC EXERCISES, by J. P. 
Lamoitier, Sybex, 2344 Sixth Street, 
Berkeiy. CA 94710. 231 pages, including 
appendices and index; ?xg inches; soft- 
cover; $12.95. 



This book enables the user to learn compu- 
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practice. The 50 graduated exercises have 
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value and their real- world applicability. Each 
exercise includes a statement and analysis of 
the problem, a solution with flowchart, com- 
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progress and comprehension at each step 
along the way. 

The programs are in the fields of mathema- 
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etc. All programs are written in Microsoft 
BASIC and verified on a TRS-80. R-E 

CIRCLE 153 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



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159 



MARKET CENTER 



PLANS & KITS 



PRINTED circuit boards from sketch or artwork. Kit 
projects. Free details. DANOCINTHS INC., Box 
261, Westland. Ml 48185 

CABLE TV converters and equipment. Plans and 
parts. Build or buy. For information send $2.00. C & 
D ELECTRONICS, PO Box 21, Jenison. Ml 4942B 

LIGHTING display sequencers and controllers. 
Send SASE for information on plans, parts and con- 
sulting services. DESIGN SPECIALTY, 15802 
Springdale St. #80. Huntington Beach, CA 92649 

SAVE steps, money. Use your telephones as an 
intercom. Plans 55.00. dB ENTERPRISES, Box 
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SPI ES like our antennas, so do HAMs and SWLs. 
SDRE, Box 242, Biacksburg. VA 24060 (703) 951 • 
9030 

CONVERT your $2000.00 oscilloscope into a 
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MICROWAVE downconverter new 4 stage design 
outperforms all the others. Kit $59.95. Assembled 
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System gain over 45 dB. $2.00 tor information. 
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SUBSCRIPTION TV KITS 

UHF Gated Pulse Kit. $39.00 

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Kits include parts, manual 
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FREE 1982 catalog; components, kits, P.C. board 
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8085 SBC COMPUTER. Bare board with manual 
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MICROWAVE television "downconverters." In- 
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FM stereo transmitter kit 88-108 MHz tunable. 
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ATARI repair business Start your own. Send $5.00 
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USED TV's — tougher the economy — more the de- 
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MECHANICALLY inclined individuals desiring 
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ELECTRONIC firm is looking for assemblers in- 
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SATELLITE TELEVISION 

SATELLITE television ... Howard/Coleman 
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formation write: ROBERT COLEMAN. Rt. 3, Box 
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This Publication 

is available in Microform. 

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DRAKE satellite receiver with modulator installed 
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continued 



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MK4a02-J£2KXS. 895 1771 $300 D 

33L432 BIPOLAR . 5.95 1791 29 00 

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2T47J3-4KX1 tf« "!"*^"] 4fr\00 

STATIC 6.96 1797 45.00 

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.170.00 



TTL 

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r+o? 



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IC SERIES 

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t-its k 

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Mill 1 *3 

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TTL 74LS SERIES 



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74LS>3«h 

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74 74L520S* M 

74 74LS34SN 1.65 

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» 74LS365N .55 

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1.95 74LS375N .54 

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1.49 74LS393N 

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1.19 74LS624N 

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1.95 



59 

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74FCOPC « 

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74nsaPC 2.15 

MF1MBC 3.30 

74F741PC 4.50 

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74F2iePC 2.34 

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74F373FC 5.55 

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HIGH SPEED CMOS 



74HCD0N 

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54 
61 
61 

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64 
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1 66 

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MHCI07N 
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LIS 

1 IS 
1 II 
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1 45 
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2:5 

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2.25 



74HCI&3N 7.Z5 

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71H092N 1.95 

74HC93N 1.95 

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w;ii!» 1.95 

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74MC2441. 4.15 

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4001 
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.26 

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4532 
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aw aojjv jsov 89¥ 1QWV 



KBP04 
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KBP10 
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VI50LAI 1.05 

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TL064CN 
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16K (ZKxBJ 2O0NS24PIN 9.95 

1K [256x4] 2SDNS22 PIN 2.65 

IK (IK x 1) 250NS16PIN Low Power 1.59 

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SK (IK x 8) 450NS 24 PIN 

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32x8 
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512x8 
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1-1 Jmm Bw 
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Display* 

END Ji7 

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DL 7077MAN 72 
DL 1416 
4 Digit. 15 stgrnem Alpna Hum < 
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|4 Digii 17 Segment Alpha Mum 
Isolator* 

110 74 1.49 TIL 111 .51 

140 74 3.6! m 26 .51 

ILCT61.66 4*133 .54 
MET 2 .52 




—SPECIAL— 

THE SIMPLE SOLUTION 

TO IX. SELECTION 
1982 I.C. MASTER 

• Deluxe 3500 Page 2-Volume Sel 

■ 55,000 I.C. Devices 

• 150 Manulacturers 

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trom 62 Manufacturers 

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Active's Super <tAQ HC 

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ACT NOW WHILE QUANTITIES LAST 



OPTOELECTRONICS 

t.D. Limpi 




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Refer to our previous 
SEPTEMBER ad for other 
devices not listed here. 

Active is your one stop 

source for the widest 

variety of electronic 

components. Contact us 

for devices not listed and 

for volume ouotes. 

Unless superceded next 

month, the prices will 

remain valid for 60 days. 



UNGAR-PRINCESS LINE FOR 
MICRO SOLDERING 



6976 I0W. 3 Wee Iran 
6990 Spicier Iron Holder 

Reliii Sponge Iff HMer 

1CW Heal Dnii 

1SW n-j Unit 

3-Wire Handle 



69111 
6915 
6903 

6950 fltnor Nip. Copjei 

6951 Screwdriver Nib, Copper 
6552 Spade NiO Copper 
6953 frecision Nip Pljtetl 



27.25 5950 

9-«2 6561 

1.62 6%2 

12.5S 6939 



1.10 6947 

2 01 -;:-. 

69E3 



Penc* Nip. Plaled 
Sciewdiiver 14ib. Flared 
Spare nib. Plated 
ftascrper Kit. 3 Tips 
Desdder lid 60 qua 
Besdder 11& 50 OiA 
DesdPer Tip 375 OW 
Desdder Tip 160 OIA 
Decider Tip, swred 
Dual-In- Line Exlrador 
'iVj L.I-^L-:!:' 



2 04 
2.04 

39 69 
6.05 
5.0.5 
5.05 
6.05 
4.40 
5.40 
5.00 



PLASTIC ENCLOSURES 

by PAC ^ TEC 

HEIGHT WIDTH DEPTH PRICE 

CM5-123K 150' i.og- 5 25- I.N 

ZVi.?-X' 2 l5 iCo 5 25 10 50 

CM6-22SI; Jbfl- 606' 625 12.30 

CM6-3O0K 3W 6 0S" 6 25" I3.B0 

luaHaWi cam. 81aa. Guy. Tart and Bhji 




tfca 



— SWITCHES — 



HPA-1D3Ct S^*ST ntxmaiiy Doen siHnfmnniure pushhutloft switch 

MSMZ80 4 POT minid lure ■■ k ■ i* ;■ i- 

SLS'fM DPOT rnifiiilure stride 5WJlcti 

DSS-.E. lOjKSilHir. DIP swilch 

IH 1 1 M-M 5PST wn/rj|l! itjcKP 5Wlll.ll 



t.2S 
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I.C. SOCKETS 



DUAL-IN-LINE 
LOW PROFILE 
I.C. SOCKETS 



Concads FTim Cpiiacii 

06 12 70 

U 11 22 

16 16 24 

19 11 79 



t: 




DUAL- IN-LINE 
WIRE WRAP 
C. SOCKETS 



Contacla Prite Criiacli Price 



51 

55 

17 

1 13 



D-SUBMINIATURE RS232 TYPE 
CONNECTORS AT MINIATURE PRICES 



49-I109P 
49- 1 1095 
49 ii-bP 
49 1II5S 
49II25P 
4-i ■ --255 
49-1 137P 
49-1 I3TS 
S = 50CK€t, P=PLUG 



HO 0FC0NI1C1S 




FLAT RIBBON CABLE 

GREY I RAINBOW 

35.F1 3JC0ND I5/FT | UCtMD 49/FT 34C0ND117/FT 



14 crjr.EJ 

16C0N0 39/FI JOCOND 99/F1 

21C0N0 65/ET 50 COtiD 1 25/FI 



40CONO I 43/FI 
50CDNC' 1 79/ FT 



SPEECH EVALUATION BOARD 

"Latest Technology from Active" 
LIMITED QUANTITY 

PLUG IN YOUR OWN EPROM AND 
IT SAYS WHAT YOU WANT IT TO SAY 

SPSB1001-01 $159.95 



TOLL FREE 800-343-0874 Mon: ■ FN.: S:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m. EST 



10:00 a.m. • 4:00 p.m. EST 



FAST — EFFICIENT MAIL ORDER SERVICE 

U.S. Customers P.O. Box 8000. Wostborough. Mass. D15B1 

Mass Residents Call |617| 366-0500 
Outside U.S. 6551 Ferriei St, Montreal Quebec. Canada H4P INI 

Tel. No.: |514] 731-7441 Teleit No.: 05-B23554. Twi No.: 610-421 -3251 

All ance5 shown arc in L* S dollars 

Foreign customers 'cn'l payment on mt I hint matt ot postal money Order in U S currency 

Minimum marl order S1G - Add S3 DO 10 cover postage & handling 

Visit out new outlet in Weslbotough. Massachusetts 

Visa and Mastercard accepted 



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CIRCLE 67 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




MORE GAIN 

Than a Mitsumi Tuner 
DSW10-140 Parts Kit 



MODEL ELC 1045 
FREQ. RANGE 
UHF 470-889 MHZ 
CHANNEL 14-83 

OUTPUT CHANNEL 3 
75 OHM INPUT 



Pari No. 

DSW10 Pnilips UHF Tuner ELC HM5 S23.95 

DSW20 Printed Circuit Board, Predniied 

Glass Epoxy $15-00 

DSW30 PCS Potentiometers 5-10K. t-5K S5.95 

DSW40 Resistor Kit 1/4 wait 9h 

Carbon Resistors 32 pes S4.9S 

DSW5G Panel Mounl Potentiomelets 

2-10K and Knobs 5S.9S 

DSWSO ICs 7 pes . I Reclilier. 

2 Regulators & 1 Heat Sink 515. 95 

DSW70 Electrolytic Cap Kil, 8 pes . . W.95 

DSWSO Ceramic Cap Kit. 33 pes SG.95 

OSW30 Vaiiablo Trimmer Kit. 4 pes S3.9S 

DSW100 Coil Kit. 2-18 Uh. t vanaole 33 uh 

- 1 - - 37-12 Torold > 26 wire S1.9S 

DSW110 IC Sockets 5-8 pins. 2-14 pin S4.9S 

DSW120 Power T ran simmer 

PRI-117Vac. SEC 24Vac, 1 amp S5.9S 

DSW130 Speaker. Oval 8 ohm S3. 00 

DSW140 Misc. Parts, Hardware & Hoofcwire 

Ant Term. Switch Opdt, Fuse, 

Fuse holder. Line Cord, ate , S7.9S 

When Ordering All Items 
DSW10-D140 Total Price S99.95 



R.F. Modulator 
Combine both audio and video output onto 
Channel 3 or 4 ol your T.V. set. 
Single I.C. chip (MC 1374) makes for quick 
and easy assembly. Single adjustment con- 
trol! A must tor every video recording or 
computer enthusiast, 
VH-0 Kit ,..., $19.95 



UHF T.V. Preamp 

Features: 

• 25 dB gain! 

• Kit 

Your reception will dramatically improve! 

This unit will enable you to pull in signals 

you never knew were there! 

For both indoor and outdoor use. Input and 

output impedance 75 ohm. No adjustment! 

Easy assembly. 

JH-0 Kit $22.95 




M-Ti 



Video Switch Box 
Model V-4803 

The V-4803 is an electronic switch- 
ing network capable of switching 
any six video inputs to any or all 
threeoutput. Savetimeand money. 
Switching of your VCR/VTR, Cable 
TV., video games antenna, micro- 
computer, pay TV. Boxes. Hassle 
Free!! 
V-4803 $74.95 



Microwave 
Receiver 
1 .9-2.5 GHZ 




Microwave Receiver 
1.9-2.5 GHZ 

PS-1 Assembled 32 element antenna . . . S19.S5 

PS -2 20 CD gam microwave receiver kit 

with variable power supply kit — $50.00 
PS-3 Complete package PS-1 $ PS-2 . . S6S.00 
Mounting Hardware Included 




^ 



tu 



Til 



Microwave Preamp 



Use with PS-3 Kit. Adds 20-25 db gain to 
boost reception distance. 

• Low Noise 

• High Gain 

• Can be used with all existing 
stop sign board receivers!!!! 

• 1.9-2.5 gHZ Freq. Range 
PS-4 $34.95 




NEW PWD KIT!!! 



in ^-^ 



Part Mo. Description Price 

PWO10 Philips UHF Tuner ELC 104S 533.95 

PWD 20 Gtass Epoxy Circuit Board. 

Prednlled St 6.95 

PWD30 PC B Pols. 4-20K, 2-1 K. 2-tOK. 

2-100K, S9.9S 

PWD40 Resistor Kit 1/4 wall S% S4.9S 

PWD50 Panel Mounl Pots 2-5K S3.95 

PWD 60 IC'S 7 pea.. 1 Reclitier. 

2-Hoat Sinks & Sockets S11.95 

PWO70 Ceramic Disc Caps — 37 pes 

& Misc. Type Capacitors S1I-95 

PWOS0 Eleclrolylic Caps l a pes $5.95 

PW09Q Variable Trimmer Capacitor 

5- 5-3S pF 54.95 

PWD100 Coil Kit 2-T37-12 Ferrite cores Torold 

4 -Prewound Indicators 52.95 

PWDIIOMisc Parts-Hookup Wire. Am 

Terminals. Fuse. Fusehoidet 

Dpdl Switch. Line Cord etc 50.9S 

PWD120 Power Transformer 

Pnmary-11? Vac, 

Secondary 24 Vac, t amp , $5.95 

PWD130 Speaker. Oval 8 ohm $2,95 

PWO140 Cabinet. Prepunched & Drilled 513.95 

When Ordering All Items 
PWD10-PWD140 Tolal Price S124.95 



A vailable by Mail Order only — Send check or money order to 

Minimum order $15,00. Add 
STAVIS ELECTRONICS, INC. 10% shipping on orders under 

nin n# t a $35.00. Orders over $35.00, 

912 W. Touhy Avenue add 5%. 

Park Ridge, Illinois 60068 Catalog - Si.oo 

(312) 564-0104 Visa & Masterchar 9 e 



Acceptable 



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Ideas, inventions, new products wanted for presen- 
tation to industry. Call free 1 -800-528-6050. Arizona 
1-800-352-0458. X831. 



SUPER SALE 



EPROM'S M «up SOup 

2716 (5V, 450nS] $3.95 13.55 CALL 

2732 (5V, 450nS) 7. 85 6.95 CALL 

2632 |5V, 450nSJ 8.25 7.95 CALL 

2764 |5V, 450nS) 23.90 CALL CALL 

STATIC RAM 

6116P-3{l50nSi 7,50 7,20 CALL 
2114L-2(20unS| 2.10 1.70 CALL 

DYNAMIC RAM 

4164(2O0nS) 7.90 7.49 CALL 

MISC 

CPU ZSOA $5.29 ea. 

CDP-1854ACE [HART] S4.80 ea. 

16K RAM Expansion Kit 
for TRS-80 Mod 111 $12.35/8 

^fe SUNTRONICS CO., ma 

' 12621 CRENSHAW BOULEVARD 

^S^ 1 -? HAWTHORNE, CALIFORNIA 90250 

~^H^»~ STORE HOURS: Mo* -Fi i aoCunme Mpm — Sit iCumrnirvn 
IN CALIFORNIA OUTSIDE CALIFORNIA TQu. FREE 

(21$ 644-114S 1800-421-5775 

M»n QnJT S1Q. P/H. S3. Accept VISA. Mas1 n mrj, Crictt, Of M.O. 



FOR SALE 



MICROWAVE receiver system. Write: "Dealers 
Wanted," Dept. RE, POB 4181, Scottsdate, AZ 
85258 (602) 941-9395. 

THE Intelligence Library. Restricted technical se- 
crets — books on electronic surveillance, lock- 
ptcking, demolitions, Investigation, etc. Free 
brochures: MENTOR, Dept. Z. 135-53 No. Blvd.. 
Flushing, NY 11354 

RESISTORS 'AW, »W 5% carbon films 3e ea. NO 
MINIMUMS. Cabinet assortments, 1% metal films. 
Request details. Bulk pricing available. JR IN- 
DUSTRIES 5834-C Swancreek, Toledo, OH 43614 

SAVE up to 50% on name brand test equipment. 
Free catalog and price list. SALEN ELECTRO- 
NICS, Box 82-G, Skokie, II 60077 

CABLE TV converters, microwave antennas, cable 
parts, plans, parts and assembled units. For in- 
formation send $2.00 SAT-TECH P.O. Box 10O26, 
Cleveland. OH 44110 

MICROWAVE TV antennas. Best in the West! Rod 
disc type. Complete with cable, accessories, war- 
ranty, 52 dB S1 25.00. Dealers wanted. GALAXY 
ELECTRONICS, 6007 N. 61 St Ave., Glendale. A2 
85301 (602) 247-1151 

STAGGERED resistor assortment ViW 5% com- 
mon values 40 each. Less common 10 each. 500 
total $10,00 CI ELECTRONICS, P.O. Box 3034, 
Camarillo. CA 93010 

MICROWAVE downconverters. Also UHF sub- 
scription TV kits. Catalog 20c. TROJAN ENTER- 
PRISES, 2920 Shelby, Indianapolis. IN 46203 

SCANNER 'monitor accessories— kits and lactory 
assembled. Free catalog. CAPRI ELECTRONICS, 
Route 1R. Canon, GA 30520 

POLICE'Tire scanners, scanner crystals, antennas, 
radar detectors. HPR. Box 1 9224, Denver, CO 
80219 

CABLE TV SECRETS— the outlaw publication the 
cable companies tried to ban. HBO. Movie Channel. 
Showtime, de scram biers, converters, etc. Suppli- 
ers list included. Send $7.95 to CABLE FACTS, 
Box 71 1 -R Palaskala, OH 43062 

LIQUIDATING $100,000 inventory: speaker 
cones, gaskets, voice coils, spiders; also finished 
speakers, 50% - 75% below cost. Free list: 1SE, 355 
Cowan Terrace W, Brownsville, TX 78521 

POWER-AMP sub-assemblies, 100 watts rms. 
.05% distortion, completely assembled and tested, 
quantity pricing available, free brochure. CLAXTON 
AUDIO, 3174 Periwinkle, Memphis, TN 38127 

RECORD • tapes! Discounts to 73%; all labels; no 
purchase obligations; newsletter; discount dividend 



166 



CIRCLE 71 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



ramsaij the first name in Counters ! 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz $129i IOBT , 

WIRED 




SPECIFICATIONS: 



HUCB1 




CT- W wind. 1 jiit »«nir4j 




CT-»KlL»^|«rtiTir' 






I09.M 


ACS AC Jaipur 




BM NicjkJ r>W MC 




*Ji|K*i Cl'ir[:r 


I2.M 


OV-] Ifli^pMtrCtin 




unw bur 


49.9) 


EiWMl 11"* tail* mpw 


!*.« 



The CT-90 Is the most vera utile, feature packed counter available for less 
than $300.00! Advanced design features include; three selectable gate times, 
nine digits, gate indicator and a unique display hold Function which holds the 
displayed count after the input signal is removed! Also, a LOmHz TCXO time 
base is used which enables easy aero beat calibration checks against WWV. 
Optionally, an internal nicad battery pact, external lime base input and Micro- 
power high stability crystal oven time base are available, The CT-90, 
performance you can count on! 



Range: 
Sensitivity: 



Display: 

Time base: 



Power 



20 Hi to 600 MHi 

Less than 10 MV to 150 MHz 

less than 50 MV to 500 MHi 

0.1 Hz (10 MHz range) 

1.0 Hz (60 MHz range) 

10.0 Hi (600 MHz range) 

9 digits 0,4" LED 

Standard- 10.000 mHz, 1.0 ppm 20-40°C. 

Optional Micro-power oveivO.l ppm20-40 a C 

8-15 VAC® 250 ma 




7 DIGITS 525 MHz $99f IRED 

The CT-70 breaks roe price barrier on lab quality frequency counters. 
Deluxe features such as; three frequency ranges - each with pre- amplification, 
dual selectable gate times, and gate activity indication make measurements a 
snap. The wide frequency range enables you to accurately measure signals 
from audio thru UHF with 1 .0 ppm accuracy - that h s .000 1 %f The CT-70 is 
the answer to all your measurement needs, in the field, lab or ham shack. 



SPECIFICATIONS: 


Ranje 


20 Hi to 525 MHz 


Sensitivity 


Less than 50 MV to 1 50 MHz 




Less than 150 MV to 500 MHi 


Resolution: 


1.0 Hz (5 MHz range) 




10.0 Hz (50 MHz range) 




100.0 Hz (500 MHz range) 


Display: 


7 digits 0.4" LED 


Time base 


1.0 ppm TCXO 20-40"C 


Power 


12 VAC 9 250 ma 



PRICES: 

CT-70 wired. 1 year warranty 
CT-70 Kit, 90 day parts war- 
ranty 

AC- 1 AC adapter 
BP-1 Nicad pack + AC 
adapter/ charger 



$99.95 

B4.95 
3.95 

12.95 




7 DIGITS 500 MHz $79 as. 

WIRED 

Here's a handy, general purpose counter that provides most counter 
functions at an unbelievable price. The MINI- 100 doesn't have the full 
frequency range or input impedance qualities found in higher price units, but 
for basic RF signal measurements, it can't be beat! Accurate measurements 
can be made from 1 MHz all the way upto500 MHz with excellent sensitivity 
throughout the range, and the two gate times let you select the resolution 
desired- Add the nicad pack option and the MINI- 100 makes an ideal addition 
to your tool box for "irj-the-fiekf frequency checks and repairs. 



8 DIGITS 600 MHz $159f IRED 



PfllCES: 




MINI- 100 wire4 I year 




wan-anty 


S79.95 


AC-Z Ac adapter for M1NI- 




100 


3.95 


BP-Z Nicad pack and AC 




adapter/charger 


12.95 



SPECIFICATIONS: 


Range: 


1 MHz to 500 MHz 


Sensitivity: 


Less than 25 MV 


Resolution: 


100 Hz (slow gate) 




1.0 KHz (Fast gate) 


Display: 


7 digits, 0.4" LED 


Time base: 


2.0 ppm 20-40° C 


Power: 


5 VDC @ 200 ma 




SPECIFICATIONS: 

Range: 20 Hz to 600 MHi TheCT-50 is aversatile lab bench counter that will measure upto600 MHi 

Sensitivity: Less than 2 5 mv to 150 MHz with 8 digit precision. And, one of its best features is the Receive Frequency 
Hf, *",! w.™ V _!° ?S° MHl Adapter, which turns the CT-50 into a digital readout for any receiver. The 
adapter is easily programmed for any receiver and a simple connection to the 
receiver* i V FO Is al I that is required for use. Adding the receiver adapter in no 
way limits the operation of the CT-50, the adapter can be conveniently 
switched on or off The CT-50, a counter that can work double-duly! 




Resolution: 



1.0 Hz (£0 MHz range) 
10.0 Hz (600 MHz range) 
S digits 0.4" LED 
2.0 ppm 20-40' C 

110 VAC or 12 VDC 



PRICES: 
CT-50 wired, I yearwarTanty S159.95 
CT-50 Kit, 90 day parts 
warranty 

RA-I, receiver adapter kit 
RA-1 wired and pre-program- 
med (send copy of receiver 
schematic) 



119.95 
14.95 



29.95 



DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99^ IRED 




PRICES: 




DM-700 wired. 1 yearwammty 


S99.95 


DM-700 Kit, 90 day parts 




warranty 


79.95 


AC-1, AC adaptor 


3.95 


BP-3, Nicad pack +AC 




adapter/ charger 


19.95 


MP-1, Probe kit 


2.95 



The DM-700 offer* professional quality performance at a hobbyist price. 
Features include: 26 differ em range* and 5 (una ions, all arranged in a 
convenient, easy to use format. Measurement* are displayed on a large 3 1 /: 
■digit, Vt inch LED readout with automatic decimal placement; automatic 
polarity, overrange indication and overload protection upto 1250voiisonall 
ranges, malting it virtually goof- proof! The DM-700 looks great, a handsome, 
jet black, rugged ABS case with convenient retractable tilt bail makes it an 
ideal addition to any shop. 



SPECIFICATIONS: 

DC AC volts: lOOuV to 1 KV, J ranges 

DC AC 

0. 1 uA to 2,0 Amps, 5 ranges 

0. 1 ohms to 20 Megohms, 6 ranges 



Current 

Resistance: 

Input 

impedance: 

Accuracy: 

Power 



10 Megohms, DC/ AC volts 
0,1% basic DC volts 
4 'C cells 



AUDIO SCALER 



For high resolution audio measurements, multiplies 
UP in frequency. 

• Great for PL tones 

• Multiplies by 10 or IO0 

• 0.01 Hz resolution! 

S29.95 Kit S3 9.95 Wired 



ACCESSORIES 

Telescopic whip antenna - BNC plug S 7.95 

High impedance probe, light loading , »..V* ,'...;* 15.93 

Low pass probe, for audio measurements 15,95 

Direct probe, general purpose usage ...,.,,.., 12.95 

Tilt bail, for CT 70, 90. MINI-I0O 3.95 

Color burst calibration unit, calibrates counter 

against color TV signal 14,95 



COUNTER PREAMP 

For measuring extremely weak signal* From 10 to 1,000 
MHi, Small ;i:e, poweted by plug transformer'included. 

* Flat 25 db gain 

* BNC Connectors 

* Great for sniffing RF with pick-up loop 

S34.95 Kit $44,95 Wired 



rviiv'e, :l * .lit li :v. in. 

2575 BA1RD RD. • PENF1ELD, NY 14526 



]»H()M ; . ORM-IKS 
CALL 7i6-5XfV395(i 



lo'tiO o.. 
add II 50 Nr 



odd IS-. COD odd 



O 

1 

03 

m 

30 

to 

CD 

ro 



CIRCLE 64 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



167 



QUALITY parts at DISCOUNT PRICES 



4 CHANNEL 8 TRACK 
.HOME UNIT 

BRAND NEW UNITS, . . 
ASSEMBLY INCLUDES; 
TAPE HEAD, MOTOR BELT, 
I1DVAC MOTOR, PRE-AMP, 
LIGHTS, SWITCHES, 
SOLENOID AND OTHER 

USEFUL PARTS 

AN EXCEPTIONAL lift'. 
17.35 PER ASSEMBLY 




JOYSTICK /> 



PRECISION 
DEVICE... 

CONTAINS <t 

sou center 

tapped alps 
pots.; 4.75 




VARACTOR 



$ FOR 51.00 
100 FOR $30.00 

MV2205 s for M. 00 

100 FOR SJO.fJO 



MITSUMI 

MODEL UES-A55 
VARACTOR UHF 
TUNER 

I FREQ P.AM&E 

i^Q - 3S9 MHZ 

| ANTENNA INPUT 

300 OHHS 

'S 25.00 each 
10 tor S220.O0 




MINI SIZE 
BUZZERS 

l)4to 3 volU75t«8 

WITH MIRE LEADS 

ll]4"ta 3 von* 75* M 

WITH PIN TEflMENALS 

3 lo 7 will 

WITH PIN TERMINALS 

J 750»*ch 



BLACK PLASTIC 
CASE j^T- 

PAC-TEC jf- 

SERIES C £L^jL^ 




BLACK PLASTIC ENCLOSURE 
ADJUSTABLE HEIGHT FRCH 
l.&J" TO 2.9J"; WIDTH 

6,85"; DEPTH 8". BUILT- 
IN STAND OFFS FOR P.C. 

BOARDS,. FRCNT £ND SACK 

PANELS NOT INCLUDED.. 

SS.25 PER CASE 



PHOTO FLASH 
CAPACITORS 

1 70 MFD 330 VOLT 

L«T" 1 1/3" !t 7/S" 
1*=^ 1 FOR SI. 50 

t^ J 10 FOR S7.0D 

600 MFD 360 VOLT 

3 i/W HIGH X I" DIA. 
S1.0D EA, ID FOR 59.00 




S 17.50 MCh 



AUTOMATIC 
RECORD CHANGER 

B.S.R. MODEL C1J6R/C/1 
PLAYS 5yiS/7E RECORDS 
MINI SHE: 8 l/ 1 -" X 1?" 

INCLUDES DUST COVER AND 
PLASTIC CASE (.NOT PICTURED) 
NITH FRONT CUT OUT TO FIT 
STEREO UNIT <NOT INCLUDED). 



COMPUTER [TRANSFORMERS 



GRADE 
CAPACITOR 

1700 mid. 150 VDC S2.0C 

2 1/?" DIA X l* 3W HIGH 

3,600 mM. 

40VDC 
i i/a" on 
6,400 mid 
60 VDC 
I J/S'oi. X i II* 

12,000mfd, 40 VDC 53,00 

2" DIA X 4 1/4" HIGH 

1S.OOOmld.75VDC S4.00 

3 1/1" DIA X 9 1/3" HIGH 

22,000 mid, 15 VDC 

2" out X Z l/2"..i6,. $2.00 



I. <K> 

, X J" HI J 

I. 

S2.SO I 



22,000 mfd. 40 VOC 

2" DIA. X 6" HIGH S3.O0 



USB 



25,000 mid, 75 VDC S4.50 

3" DIA X ** 3/B" HIGH 

45,000mlrJ.25VDC 

"" DIA. x i« „ ICM $3 50 
72,000 mfd. 15 VDC 

2" DIA. X V HISH Sa.Sfl 

COMPUTER GRADE 
CAPACITOR SPECIAL 

130,000 mfd. st 6V 

JV DIA 11 kli" HIGH S I. SO 

ClAMPSrOriTC*PAClTOBSMW»» 



750 MFD 330 VOLT 

2" HIGH X 1 5/9" 

SI. 25 EACH 10 FOR SI 1.00 



SLIDE POTS 

safes*) 500K 

linear tapor 

7 St EACH 



$ 



FREE-' SEND FOR OUR NEW 40 PAGE CATALOG &?££, 



IV ■ i 
2 7/S"LG.- 

I 5/1+" TRAVE 




DC WALL 

TRANSFORMER 



ALL ARE I1SVAC 
PLUG IN 



4 VDC it 70 MA 
5.8 VDC a! 125 HA 
9 VDC II 100 MA 
9 VOC al 225 MA 



120 volt 
primaries 



S .6 VOLTS at 7SO MA % 3.00 

G VOLTS it 150 mA 11.25 

12 V.CIil 500mA 52.50 

16.5 V. it 3 AMPS SB SO 

IB VOLTS It 350 MA $2.00 

18 VOLTS It 1 AMP SA.SO 

IB V.C-T. it 2 AMP 55,50 
25 2 VCT at 2 8 AMP JS 50 

35 VCT. II 1 AMP S350 

42 VCT It 1.2 AMP $4.50 

55 VCT. it 2 AMP S5.50 



L.E.D.'s t 

STANDARD JUMBO 4 
DIFFUSED 

RED 10 FOR Si. SO 
GREEN 10 FOR $2.00 | 
YELLOW 10 FOR $2.00 

FLASHER LED f\ 

« 5 VOLT OPERATION 
j RED JUMBO 

I hi POLAR 

2 FOR 



I LED /I 

E RATION (J 

sin ■ 

1 LED Tl 



SUB MINI LED 



.07g"X ,098* 

20raA it 1.7»i 

10 FOR SI. 00 

200 FDR SIB. 00 

QUANTITY PRICES AVAILABLE 



BLACK LIGHT 
{ULTRAVIOLET) 

£. I FSTSBL S2.50 • 



KEYBOARD 

W/ CBS* 




TERMtNATES TD FLEXIBLE 
CABLE WITH CONTACTS CM 
.10H CENTERS, EDGE 
COWaTCTOR INCLUDED... 
S<i.50 PER KEYBOARD, CASE, 
AND CONNECTOR 



EDGE CONNECTOR 



4PDT RELAY 

» 14 ;i r. : ' T li 

■ VimpccKiiicif 
» 24 wall 4 £ M 

■ Ued buE rul'r tui*d 

$1.70 EACH 



6 VDC RELAY 



MINIATURE 

D.R.D.T. 

5 AW CONTACTS 

FUJUITSU < FBRJ21D006 

51.7S EA 10 / 16.00 



6SS 



ALL ARE .156" SPACING 

15/30 GOLD 

SOLDER EYELET S2, 00 EACH 

18/36 GOLD 

SOLDER EYELET S2.00 EACH 

22/44 GOLD 

SOLOOtTAIL CP.C, STYLE) 
S2.S0 EA 10 FOR 532. 50 

22/44 TIN 

SOLDERTAIL (P.O. STYLE) 
51.15 EA 10 FOR S12.S0 

42/84 GOLD 

SOLDER EYELET SJ+,00 EACH 




CANNOi 

S PRONG 



(NEC 



CHASSIS MOUNT 
CONNECTOR 
12.00 EACH 
10 tor *19 00 




KEY SWITCH 



(*V 9 AMPS 



S.RS.T, 

9 AWS t 125 VAC 
V KEY REMOVES BOTH 
I POSITIONS 53. SO EA 



13 VDC RELAY 

CONTACT: S.P.N.C. 
10 AMP S 120 VAC 
ENERGIZE COIL TO 

OPEN CONTACT 

COIL: 15 VOC 
650 'i.'-r .. ... 
SPECIAL PRICE $1.00 EACH 
10 FOR 59.00 



2 CHANNEL LIGHT ORGAN 

EASILY HOOKS INTO STEREO 5PEAKERS 
AND ALLOWS 110 VAC LIGHTS TO DANCE 
WITH WSIC. TWO SEPARATE 110 VAC 
OUTPUTS FOR HIGH AND LCM FREQUENCY 

AUDIO SIGNALS. U5E TWO ORGANS FOR 
STEREO... 56. SO PER UNIT 
COLOR LIGHT STRING AVAILABLE $1.75 EA 
f 



L-PAD 

STANDARD ! OHM 

50 DB L-PAD. . . 
$1.50 EACI 




1 8' LINE CORD 

SJT H/E 



MULTr-SWlTCH 

8 STATION 



INTERLOCK IMG ASSEMBLY 

9-D.P.D. T./9-*#.P.D.T. 
6 I/!" MOUNTING CENTERS 
53.00 PER ASSEMBLY 



5 STATION 

INTERLOCKING ASS£t«LY 
J-M.P.D.T./2-D.P.D.T. 
X 1/B" MOUNTING CENTERS 
$2.50 PER ASSEMBLY 

3 STATION ^*fc 

MOi~ I NTERLOCt I MG 03lX 
2-D-P.D.T./l-l(.P.D.T. 
PUSH OWPUSH OFF STYLE 
2 1/2" MOUNTING CENTERS 
$1.50 PER ASSEMBLY 



ROLND GRAY 
$2.00 EACH 10 FOR $13.50 



MICROWAVE 
TRANSISTORS 



N.P.N. SIL1CCN 

SPECIAL PRICE 

$2.50 EACH 



73 ohm CO-AX 

12 
FOOT 

R.C.A. PLLCrBbTH 
ENDS. .USED FOR VIDEO 
GAttS, ETC $1,25 EA 




EQUIPMENT SLIDES 



^^ 



CHASSIS -TRAi: MODEL 
■^ *^ CJDOS 

ENGTH 22" CLOSED. 



J SECTION. LEHJT 
HOLDS TO 85 LBS, EXTETJJS 2J" 

$S.OO PER PAIR SCtt HARDWARE INCLUDED 



O-IO MINUTE TIMER 

ADJ. TIMING 
MOTOR FROM 
0-10 MtN. 
RATED 10 AW>5. 
125 VAC MOUNTS 
ON 1" CENTERS 




LIGHTED 
PUSH BUTTON 

RED LIGHTED 120 VAC 
■ 10 AMP. S.P.S.T. 
"POER" PRINTED CN 
FACE. MOUNTS IN 
7/B" SQUARE MOLE.. 
. 50 EA 10/ $13.50 



Svolt 9amp/hr 

RECHARGEABLE 



CI 



ELPOWER < EP6?o 
SOLID GEL CELL 
5 1«" X X 1/V 

X 2 i/V< 

$15.00 EACH 



2" ALLIGATOR CLIPS 
7 clips for S 1.00 

100 clip* lor 512.00 
500 clipi lor 550.00 



CRYSTAL 



o 

< 

168 



HLL ELECTROniCS CORP « 



90S S. Veimoni Ave. 
PO BOX 2O406 
Los Angeles. Calif. 90006 



' OujniitiCl L.ftlirrfl 
. M,n Ordr, Sin 00 
■ ami S2 50 

ShipprnqUSA 



•C*>ir flu AdS6'. 
■ .■■.■■;' Shipping 
NO COO 1 



TOLL FREE ORDER NUMBER 

800-826-5432 
ak HiCA I21313S0-8OOO 



REMOVES VOCAL FROM MOST STEREO DISCS 

The Thompson Vocal Eliminator can jctuiltY remove mott oi 
virtually all el a wlo vocaliit rjom a itandarO stereo record and vet 
leave mast cl the background musiL untoucherl! Net an equalner 1 We 
can prove it works over the phone Write or call lor a 24 page 
brochure and demo record. 

Write to: LT Sound, Oept R. P □. Boi 33S, Stone Mountain 
GA 30086. Phone (40* 49 3- 125a COST $295 00 



certificates; 100% guarantees. Free details. DIS- 
COUNT MUSIC CLUB, 650 Main Street, PO Box 
2000. Oept. 3-1082. New Rochelle, NY 10801 

MICROWAVE TV downconverlers, downconverter, 
power supply boards, antenna cookbook, with de- 
tailed plans, $20.00. Parts: downconverter. $15.00; 
power supply. $15.00. MICRO ENGINEERING, 
Box 17231, Minneapolis, MN 55417 

OWN telephone answering machine? Have 
celebrities answer your phone. Hilarious. Free de- 
tails; CALLENOER, Box 136R. Springfield Gar- 
dens, NY 11413 

POWER-line filter, reduces RFI and surges to pro- 
tectexpensiveequipmenl.Unitriasgroundedoutlet 
with monitor light. $49.95 each, plus $2.50 handling. 
PATH ELECTHONICS, INC., 1500 East Algonquin 
Rd., Arlington His., IL 60005 

USED memory chips 41 16-200ns $1.00 each. Buy 
10 get 1 extra. Payment with order SKAN ENTER- 
PRISES, 118 E, Third. San Bernardino, CA 92410. 
$3.00. shipping and handling 

IN-DASH AM-FM cassette stereo x-body $49.95, 
retail $69.95. C.H. WINDHAM, 509 Midland Ave., 
Sanford, NC 27330 




WRITE FOR 



McGEE'S 



SPEAKER & ELECTRONICS CATALOG 

1001 BARGAINS IN SPEAKERS 

Tel.: 1 (816) 8*2 5092 
1904 MCGEE STREET KANSAS CITY. MO. 64106 



ATTENTION: Color computer users. Coco software 
and hardware catalog. Send SASE to SPECTRUM 
PROJECTS, 93-15 86 Drive, Woodhaven, NY 
11421 

CABLE converters and radar detectors, video 
stabilizers, image enhancers and more!' Catalog 
$1 .00. ELECTRONICS ETCETERA, P.O. Box 826- 

P S nlvang, CA 93463 

PCB 1 5e sq-in. Free drilling. Quantity discount. IN- 
TERNATIONAL ENTERPRISE, 6452 Hazel Circle. 
Simi Valley, CA 93063 

CONTRACT manufacturing service; short run pro- 
duction, prototyping, DAUS ELECTRONICS, P.O. 
Box 831, Angier, NC 27501 

FREE speaker catalog! Woofers, mids, tweeters, 
hardware, crossovers, grille cloth, plans, kits, In- 
formation, much more. Discount prices. UNIVER- 
SAL SOUND, Dept. RE2253. Ringling Blvd.. Sara- 
SOta. FL 33577 (S13) 953-5363 

AUDIO function generators. Fully assembled for 
$54.95! Free details: ROBINSON DIGITAL, 134 
East Wheat Road, Buena. NJ 08310 



QUALITY MICROWAVE TV SYSTEMS 



1.9 to 2.5 GHz Antennas 

Corcpltic System 

IRod SI* It is pictured] 112195 
EitmpEelE Systim 

IRellEtlor Slylt 1! piclurtdl 114995 
Down CcrvtrEer 

taembied tt Tnitg 1S495 

Pcifter Supnl v |l? in Itul S49 95 

»«« Dull Suit Jtnttnnn In Steel 

Galaxy Electronics 
6007 N. 61st Ave. 
Glendale. Az. 853QT 
1602)247-1151 

CQD's Quantilv Pricinq 




90 DAY WARRANT* 
PARTS S LABOR 



CIRCLE 72 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



AMERICA'S 



B0aB 



ELECTRONIC SUPERSTORE 

VIDEO • TELEPHONE • ELECTRONICS • CABLE TV • PARTS 



"UOMORKwf 1 ? 
. WUTHI 

'NFORMATIOM 
t CIMTM... 



ETCO ELECTRONICS, PLATTSBURGH, N.Y. 12901 (518-5618700) 



r»MT*itic «K»«e«nn«» chihuu 

Will Lilt FtiMOTI IOHHOI MBit TV 
MOM lUWD TajJUi AN T CM* HI 



$ 



189 




II |urn& the sel on-'oll line 
times the picture, tells the 
lime, selects channels at ran- 
dom or in sequence, pre-seis any number of Favorite channels 
and pre-sets on/olf times up lo 2* hours ahead JH7ZAQ18 



vstta nit cotmiTn iumfhatii Hwiujm 
TAHK*P«Ott*AiLtTY Restores your VCfVs 

OC capably for program- 
ming. Restores remote 
channel control Enables 
videotaping ol one cable program while 
watching mother M7VA95Q 



VllXIOR 

■:-lj"i 

4 bfiXAL ^ HMMQ 



89* 



THI AMAIIHG 60 CHANNEL JIBIOiD 400 
WIRELESS CARLE TV COHVIITU 



^s^^Esm 




Change channels turn your set an or off, or even line tune 
wimout leaving your comfortable viewing position. Channel 3 out 
put. S4T7-AJ17 



SMASHING ALL SALES RECORDS 

OUR NEW 30 CHANNEL 

CABLE TV CONVERTER 



S47AEW7 

Converts mid & super band cable chan- 
nels for viewing on your TV set! 



MIDBAND BLOCK 
CONVERTERS 

9S 



HOT HIW JJ CHANNEL 

REMOTE CONTtOi CABLI TV COHVIITU 




39 



YOUR 
CHOICE 



S«7VAZ7J.. Midband lo 
lowbando-cttannel 
547YA27S Midband lo 
h i rjnoano 7-ch an n el . 



NIAT VIDEO CONTROL CENTER 






THE ETCO MICR0 1000 
36 CHANNELVCR PROGRAMMER 

AND CABLE TV CON VERTER 
ffc^r . [NEW!] 





Includes remote TV on/off switch and 
fine tuning control. 30 FT control cable. 
S47VBH3 



DEftlERS 
WANTED 1 



Equivalent lo or heller Ihtn: Vidcor 20M, Philips CTC-2, Magna 
*tn MX^OCC, UndHV V2u\ Rhodes CO-SU, Philip* CTC*M, 
WinegirdVC-rtHKlindolhBTS... 54TVB1U 



As above - with Vernier tuning: adjustable tuning insures 
tola I lacking compatibility with all TV sets. S47VC47T- . T9.95 



Interconnects and operates 

up to 5 video components. 
Handles Cable TV, Games. 
VCRs. disc players, etc Enables you to view TV while taping 

or dubbing You'll think up othtf applications MTVCW9 



VCR/VTR SWITCH BOX 



Kwik disconnscl cables with "F" 
connectors - Very low Insertion loss r 
because Ihere are no switches. One 
lime hook for VCR, TV, Game, Cable, 
elc, - Attractive brown & wood grain - 
Compact si2*: G" 1 4-1/2' 1 a 3" H. 
The easy £ ellicienl method for mul- 
tiple connections tor your VCR-TV- 
ANTMUX-TV Game. etc. 547VC3S7 




The new easy-to-use. easy-to- install, selective locking A)B 
switch system that permits parental control over regular TV pro- 
gramming, pay-TV, cable TV. video lapes or video discs. 
547VB345 



PHILIPS VIDEO CONTROL CENTEI 

m 



IHCtlBIIU ITCO C0PY6WARD 1 TABIIIZU 
AND VIDEO IMAM ENHANCER SELLS AT A 
PRICE BELOW WHAT TOO WOULD PAT FOI 
EITHER UNIT IF PURCHASED SEPARATELY! 




HAND NEW FACTORY 
SURPLUS VHI/VHF VA1AC- 
TOSTUHEB ASSEMBLY 



PRICE CUT] ^O 




547VC30B 



■ Admiral assembly Mo. NC SUM 
Tandem - side by side VHF and 
UHF tuners made origin ail y for 
Admiral. Numbers lhat appear on 
the lunars are; 294-7029, 
S227AAFA. 01C72S-!. 294-7131, 
S132AAFB. 



547ZA021 

An ETCO exclusive! Combines both instruments in 
one. It works like a charm! Try one on our 30 day 
money back guarantee! 



DEALERS WANTED 



FACTORY SURPLUS 
UHF TIMERS 

Brand new production sur- 
plus All solio stale. Ideal Eor 
experimental work building 
cable TV converters, etc. 
54JSU09* 



B132AAFB. a-. 

4f i-*s ea.;i»LC^^" 

S47VASS6.. As above wiin 

ueteni j.m 

54TSIJ2SS..- Solid slate VHF 
tunars. . S.95 



V Kf ,'tM 7 3 O KM T 6 1 OXM M A J CM I H O T« * M t FOI Matt 

>{ 5UAEMS rugged oul- 
' door version 
Very popular Use to f f 12.21 J1.S5 aa./S 

couple and malch cable tfcEA./S 547AE152 with built in 
TV to TV sal Also couples VCfl macbi- CB interference III lor 
nes, TV games elc.5-3MMHz MJAEJSO ti.as.ji,7S£A./s 



99' 



DELIVERY HANDLING; INSURANCE CHARGES 
Find the total amount ol your order and your zip code 

INN 
lo 

4.41 

5.78 

7.77 

10.61 

13.55 

Check with order please Visa 1 Mastercard O K 

I Sorry. 

sales 

phone 




Neat low loss switching unit selectively Feeds 6 dilferent video 
sources to your TV set. Also possible towatcb one source wbile 
viewing a noi her M72A045 



<TV 



±S 



T V/FM SIGNAL BOOSTIR FOB 
CABLI OR OFF AIR USE 

improves TV and FM by reslo- 
ring signal loss which hap- 
pens during basic VCR instal 
Gallons and multiple set instal 
lalions.TSohm MTVAIfll 17*15 IA,/S 



19" 



below 

II Your Order Ton] s 


01HO 
10 

2BS99 


190*0 
lo 

5i«; 


UploJ20.00 
U0.01lot3o.IXI 
530.01 to Mt. 00 

tio.oitotot.ot 

tS0.01loSM.00 
Over I90.P 


2.47 
2. SO 
3» 
545 
7.25 
E.SE 


2.49 

3.52 
4.62 
5.51 

J. El 
10.39 



MORE CABLE TV BARGAINS 

S47VA9B4... detective as-IS"' VHF.'UHF block converters "U- 
Fix" SH.ts 

s 47V as* 1 . . OA K V 2B rac tor v reo u.u caol e convene rs . .. 159.9S 
S4WA9S1-. Lindsay V2-U VHFiUKF block conveners (brand 

newl 111,19 

S47VC931.. RCA as channel aet top converter Used 

Guaranteed tit M 

S47VC93C... OAK FET3S (jewel boxt 30 channel remole lused- 

g.taranteed] . tie.BS 

S47V9SSS. .. OAK L35 gel top 35 channel convener (used 

guaranteed], . . ssa.9S 

i47VAS«...usea (as-isi OAK vje X channel cable TV 

converlera 13B.BS 

547VA99S... Used (as-isi TOCOM DCioco remote control 20 chan- 
nel convener. S2S.SS 



ETCO Electronics 

Dspt5S1 

Plattsburgh, N.Y. 11901 

Send my free ETCO Catalog now. 

I am not currently receiving your catalog 

Name .___ 

Address _^__ 




L couple and malch cable Mc EA./S S47AE1SZ. with built in ^ v k " l ' r, c o o JB ^ . ! ,! ,l "S S S 5 V ,'" * "^"J,, ,?. Z --City B 

TV to TV sal Also couoies VCR macbi. CB inte.te.ance liter. . . ^JF^Ve^ m *"™Z o'uMei.* I State . ZIP 
nes. TV game: elC. 5-300MH; MfAEMO »■»»■ »■" ^A./s BhonoorderOesknaverc loses ^^^ I ~ ^^^ 



o 

I 

en 
m 

33 
CO 

co 
ro 



CIRCLE 65 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



169 




PHASOB PAIN FIELD — Patented and recently developed 
in our labs is being Eesled by Gov't Tor riol control Soon to came 

H under weapons restrictions as an internal machine Easily hand- 
held. Hazardous IF NOT USED WITH DISCRETION. 
^jPPF-1 PLANS (sold lor animal control), . . 115.00 

S| INVISIBLE PAIN FIELD GENERATOR - Produces a di- 
rectional tield or moderately intense pain to back or bead up to 
50' . Cigarette pack sr?e enclosure is easily hidden 
IPG-3 PLANS ..17.00 IP6-3K KIT S PLANS W4.50 
I P6-30 (assemo led lor a ni ma I ran Iral ) J59.50 

IPHASOR STLTNIBURNING WAND - Pioduces sullicienl 
electrical energy capable of burning llesh. Intended as a person- 
al detense device. 
PSW-3 PLANS 18,00 PSW-3K KIT t PUNS JS9.50 



RUBY LASER RAY PISTOL — Intense visible red, burns, 
hazardous, with parts sources. 

RUBY PUNS (includes all pais sources! $15.00 

M CARBON DIOXIDE LASER — General e 5 20-40 watts ot 
h continuous power capable ol burning, cutting, hazardous, (will 

: all part sources) $15.00 

■J LASER RIFLE — Produces 200- 3000 pulses ol 30 watt opti- 
cal energy. Portable and easily hand-held 

LRG-3 PLANS $10.00 

LRG-3K KIT PLANS (minus diode) $129.50 

POCKET LASER — Far Ihe beginner, visitee reo ~ Optical 
version", nun- hazardous 

LHC-2 . . $5.00 LHC-2K KIT & PUNS . $24.50 

HIGH POWERED PORTABLE ENERGY SOURCE 
FOR LASERS AND MAGNETIC WEAPONS — Explod- 



■i\ 



wires. Shockwave, elc Miniature size. 

SI PLANS . $*UW HPS-1K KIT & PUNS 



PARTICLE BEAM WEAPON - PUNS . 



$49.50 
$15.00 



INFINITY XMTR — Uses telephone lines for selective home 
orotlice listening while away on business or vacation. 

INF-l PLANS $15.00 

SEE IN DARK Long range, total darkness. 

MSD-4 PUNS $10.00 
LONG RANGE WIRELESS MIKE — Crystal clear quality 
— miniature 

FBT-7 PLANS . . $7.00 FBT-7K PLANS & KIT , . $34.50 
WIRELESS TELEPHONE TRANSMITTER — Long 
. range, automatic. 

VWPM-5 PUNS $10.00 VWPM-5K PUNS J KIT (34.50 






Send tor FREE catalog descripton of above plus hundreds more 
plans, tills and completed items. We accept MC or Visa or wben 
ordering, send check or money order. We pay shipping charges 
on orders over $50.00, otherwise include 1 0% with remittance. 
SEND TO: SCIENTIFIC SYSTEMS 
DEFT. R8. BOX 716. AMHERST. N H 03031 



CIRCLE 88 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



NOT available until now. Stereophonic headphone 
converter restores missing space perspective to Hi- 
Fi sound systems. Experience exhilarating power ol 
Ihis new accessory. Discover new listening dimen- 
sion. For order and information write INDUSTRIAL 
CYBERNETICS, P.O. Box 2477. Santa Barbara. 
CA 93120 

USED parabolic antennas 6-S-TO' diameter. 
From commercial installation. Suitable for satellite 
reception. Best offer takes them. Call (216) 647- 
5827 or (419) 746-2378 



«.»»».»««■» »»»»».«» *««.« » ■.■* ■ »« ■ * ■ » ■ . 



RF MODULATORS 
Ion tho video Industry/ 



Sjtvliiic umAiIiewi ft-om dumwl 1 mm UHF1 
Kill 1 2li«nhlpd modcil fw ill H erKfowtwi ...includinE w new 
AWI*-Wfllf #lflpM4 t* raHMl IntlM ctovuttt. Aiifr an •ilniiivE 
lint fit IMRiHri, tannic Mi kilt. FREE CATALOG 

/// PHME tlBI 9(1-1771 

"l.SI ,^-tS^^ I ATV Aosojin;/! 

I ME BBOitnWT 
DAKOTA PITT, HE HIS I 



Lm«.nmTrm mm w 



REVERBERATION 

FOR ORGANS 



Solid state with controls for rever- 
beration and room size. 
EVERY ORGAN SHOULD 

OWN ONE, Sena for frttflyer- 

DEVTRON1X ORGANS, INC. 

6101 WARE HO USE WAV 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 95826 Depl. B 



THE COST OF 
LIVING. 

GIVE TO THE 
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY. 



I 



ELECTRONIC KITS FROM HAL-TRONIX 
2304 KHZ doin converters, tunes rN oh 

CHANNELS 2 TO 7 OK YOUR OWN HOME T,V. 
HAS FREQUENCY RANGE FROM 2O00 MHZ TO 
2500 MHZ, EASY TO CONSTRUCT AND CCHES 
COMPLETE WITH ALL PARTS INCLUDING A 
DIE-CAST ALUM CASE AND COAX FITTINGS, 
REQUIRE A VARIABLE POWER SUPPLY AND 
ANTENNA (Antenna can be a dish type 
OT coffee can type depending on the 
signal strength in your area. ) 
2304 MOD 1 (Basic Kit) $49.95 

iL *ii c ftftft A tilling*) 

2304 MOD 2 (Basic / Pre-amp) $59.95 

(HKiJUrt Cftftft & 111 1 1*0*) 

2304 MOD 3 (Hi-Gain Pre-amp) $69.95 

fKtfdM eat* L hums, I 
POWER SUPPLY FOR EITHER MODEL ABOVE IS 
AVAILABLE. COMES COMPLETE WITH ALL PARTS. 
CASE, TRANSFORMER, ANTENNA SWITCH AND 
CONNECTORS (Kit) $24.95 

Assembled... 134.95 

Slotted Microwave Antenna For Above 
Downverters $39.95 

PREAMPLIFIERS 
HAL PA-19 — 1.5 mhz to 150 mhr. 19db gain operates 
on 8 to IS volts at lOma. Complete unit $8-95- 
HAL PA-1.4 — amhito 1.4 ghJ 1010 1 2 db gain oper- 
ates on S to IB volts at lOma Complete unit SI 2. 95 
[The above units are ideal for receivers, counters, etc.) 

16 LINE Touch tone decoder kit with 

P,C, BOARD AND PARTS $69.95 

\2 LINE Touch tone decoder kit, with 

P.C. BOARD AND PARTS $39,95 

16 LINE Encoder kit, complete with 

CASE, PAD AND COMPONENTS ,.,.$39.95 



12 LINE Encoder kit, complete with 

KifiP. PAD AND components . . , . $z9 , 9 



>5 



CASE, PAD AND COMPONENTS 

man""hak"other KITS available 



tfe 



5HII>t>IH<] 

;HFCP:MAric-H 



rftM krffcwn: mftali-ltlt 

HalTronix 

P.O. E»ok 1 101 

Sauth$Qif . M! 40195 



OHBEM ClVE«$i)rjrJwi[L« JtRPFEg FWiPAID EXCEPT 

on itemi WHEBEAOCNTpOHAL CHAftCtM «lfliauEiTin 

OHa^rjEH>LE»TIHA>[l»Mr^EAt[IH;LUHJUarnOM- 
M H H »0" HAMQLIW AHQ MAJLUHS CHUM! 1 



CIRCLE 85 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




We accent VISA MC 
COD. CHECK or MO 



AHIES ZERO 
INSERTION 
FORCE 
SOCKETS - 



cam actuated, true imta i am rtion 

tin plated saiaei \nt\ pins. - 
capable oi Being pluggM mio 

tUd %ocke ts, inc'uding wnp wrjiTJ 

SeckK No 

Ho Pint I'M 35 5C 

11CH5 34 i 4.35 13.00 13.00 

11094 It 4, SO 4.QS 3.75 

1t037 40 5.D5 S.35 4.05 

11DU 64 tO-K 0.4$ g.TO 



FIRST QUALITY COMPONENTS- NOT MAIL ORDER "SECONDS" 



«o* a ,$22. 50 



RESISTOR ASSORTMENT aasoa - ™ pc* i i « c * »«» a « 

Slock No. 8250 r IQ*a. of H>,2-VS-TB-J2-JT-33-3,g-4T-5'B. OHM -, B , 

Sloch No. 83402 1 n. of EO-B2-1 Ofr I 2C- 1 50-1 0Q- 1 2& 2 7t> 3 .K& 1 00 OHM i or ant 

Stock Ho. B2503 1 ■■. of 470-SfiO-AfiO-B2LV1 K-t ;3K-1 . Bfc%SK-a>3K-S»7 OHM a»Dtm«ni 

SlOCX NO. B350-. 10 0*. or 3-3K-3.t)K-4 7K-5.GK'6.flK-& 2K-10K-i;K-i^,K i.3h. Ohm 

SlOCJt NO, B2505 lOo*. of 22K-27K-33N-3SK-47K-SfiK'eSK-82^1 OOK-120K OHM 

Stock No- B25D6 1 an. of « SOK-1 BaK-22QK-270K-?3OK -3«3K-470K 56.1K GSOK B20KOHM 

Slock No. B25C7 1 D on. of H|-1 .2M-1 5M 1 .flM-2.2MS.7M S .3M-3.9H-4 7M-£i.eM OHM 



WILD ROVER 

Touch switch car»uie 

OpOfJtthfl ffiOhOfi ii 005 w.llt:-...: Ilu- 
■mi- Ol i !n.".iTH'i: aim Exlrtmoly '■*■■<■ on ; 
4hO 0<1 wrfh low noil* iNotrmjUy oo«jn - 
Tilad 1 1 S VAC. i & imp- 30 milliohn rtj- 
ttttMtOJ- CIBradiutby 1601 hK.K 
Slock Ha 1-0 10 25, 

12DOB B1.3I i i i ;■ J o'. 



30/40 ROSIN COflE SOLDER 



Slock 




Langth 


Wtlflhl 




NO 


L.H 


<r«ti 


(«■) 


P>IICO 


50O75 


043 





1-3 


03 38 


soore 


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75 


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4 38 


K»T7 


OA2 


50 


8 


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50078 


039 


33 


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5O070 


Q33 


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3.0040 


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TL092 (Dual) 
TL094 (Quad) 


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Size 


Cat. No. 


Each 


A 
A 
B 
B 


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50 position 
40 position 
50 position 


1520 
1520 
2898 
2898 


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41/4 x5'b 
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PC-Mount Piezo Buzzer 

NEW! 2*9 



ti 



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Micro-Mini 5VDC Relay 

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Jusi 'Vaax^nxV**, 

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11 25GX4 /250m'i£MIK. 

II 10Z43I <2»Tfl CUOS(4»Lj 

II i«4i« 4250n CUOS Bl« 

II 1b4 iHn r~' 

ii ::■:.■ 

tl 73fl«1 

II 14.* flSns 

IE 1024^1 f50m 

11 IM (50W 




OVNAMfC RAMS 



4116N-I 
41C4N-2 
UUSJtl 
UM52&? 

wjszn 

■BBS 
uuar-o I 

uij 1 -;:-^ : 
WJJSIM4 
MW5:iJ 3 

745105 
745217 
7452W 
7453SZ 
745471 
745472 
7454 73 
745474 
24S475 
745471 
{ J4SS79 



2.49 
1,35- a. 1-1 115 



II 1924^1 «3O0nj.| 

II 409C41 29flfll 

II E5.3*hi j154ii! 

11 t*,»W 29DM 

1< s4.3*4ii |250m 

II 95,534x1 ttDOni 

II !D24,1 «XHM 

77 2C4fji Hfim 

11 4C9ftii i2S**v> UK4DS6 4 95 

21 4Kftii 200mk21D7 3 95 

II (5,U4ajJl50fl| tn~W1I.H 

II L(.5t4-iJ (2»nj 1.B-fJ14.H 

II P4.344M BSw 

11 BESbl (2O0fltt 



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FflOUT 5 10301-1 I 

W14 T 5. I5349-H A 

HWUOC (43*11 4 

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1»3 

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f45affii77l9 
4Hw{ kUC2S.3Z 



21 1152x1 (iSOfti; 



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MICHOPROCESSOfi CHIPS 

Z90i7$OCj 40 CPU iUK4«UN| L2MH7t 
MM(7«-1|i 41 C2U MK3ZS0N-4|[4UH7k 
2H5 40 CPU|.HK3WaN-SitBWHjJ 

CCf1997 40 CPU 
2450 44 UPU 

lOUHQlADt 40 CHJ - *■ fcl i'U* I CJffl Ttfflfi Cr '. 
" liPU v/QKk 145* iuln num | 
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3 55 
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24 95 



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DP4212 
DP5214 
DPB21B 
DP82J4 
DP523J 
DPS220 
DP4234 
IM 5*243 
l#5S?5fl 
DPB51 
DP5253 
DPB355 
DP1217 
DP03.5S 
DP4275 
DP42B 
DPU03 
W4304 
DP4307 
DP4M1 
DPI310 

opun 



efiD0/6SOD SUPPORT DEVICES 

40 unj 

40 UPUW.1H Peck an« RAH 

24 -JOiBS^Jlt+lAM 

40 PtriptwjiiLnlir.jUi0«jUC442Oi 

24 Hvtafinmrmtonmlim 

24 !DZ4iB &.!WW(HCBWS3-|. 

24 lUrncrvrajiDdn? Mjput 

24 Sp/ittxmxi U*4> Cutj Jyjc**- 

24 DBOObtnCivUiHDIlEM 

24 240»Ei Usfti'iJM 

11 DuM 3- iUli tWS irii* .;UCJ126! 

SUPPORT DEVICES 



44J CPU. 



24 



5'tKl Inpul/Dulpjl 
mMy Inlirmpt CaiirO 
■MriMHl 4jf hiw 

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21 E.rtM^Cantra*riOti.fDni*r 



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24 Prog INMnUTrw . 
40 PfOO Pt(K**rtl^[Pf1) 
40 PTog.DUACflTtfel 
21 Prufl ln(i:mcH;orM 
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SifMWirafiftoEkKwnf 
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745372 
745573 

4Z5Z3 
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125123 
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125130 
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0*4475 1B4H 
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cw 5 -:■;>, 

0H47S191N 



.. 25644 

Tl 3£d 

ll r:- f j 

20 ?5*tf 

70 51 f)J 

■ iJZri 

24 552h* 

24 SIM 

24 ::■.- 

II 512314 

II iiln 

ll 1024x4 

11 IB24X4 

■I 32kS 

24 512x5 

11 32x5 

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"OH C IB352I 

PMH T S rflSlS/) 
fflOHOE 177515) 
PflOM T S (275H1 
PrTCUTS 27SIIJ 
PfWUD.C IZ7570 
PBDUT 5 (27521> 
PPrDUOC 127511 

PM410C ]|251M i 

PHWIT5 ptifi 

2C4JU4 PIQUO.C I2S104 

204h4 Pvcu:.S H2S185; 
204IA4 PROWOC HSIHI 
2C44i5 FPOU'S 16251911 

flOM S 

2513 111 40| 24 CMyjilt-GeniriECTIURMfCja.: 

2513IM2H 24 th*«!erO*r.»ijt«|LB«lfCiStl' 

HMOS flEAD QHLY MEMORIES 

HCUEflflOP 24 '2i.i-]-i?«':i f,^,*l«lwyCriH 
UCUM74W 14 121*5*7 UjlhSymoeUPWlirii 
MCWHTiOP 24 I24rjx7 iVptu CwrtftJClur Q«A. 

DATA ACQUISITION 

<K1Q MjsMiOC/rerja*rtn +5vt2-jv 

UC3470P 11 »4pm[hknkK4UPS 7 i|pm 

■UCHWLI 11 trtD/I.CffTWfl* OnCDtoiLCH 

U103-1CN 1| UnWMJJHe1rrtf*w2 5fc 

AF1J1-1CJ 24 foucriTBfl*i&iPB-M.Frfr 

AH2MCJ 24 Tfcjtf,T<«H«*,M-vif*«f 

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L7398N 
I U3Mhi 
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3,95 



THiB*rJhiH TrjirrwJll 
4 Jffl IrjglOpArr* 

I JjrrpltHMAflipif 
TunpComp Pr*c Pirl I ScpB-vt*l 5.00 

21 Bb4A,'[>& > wt fr |lL5BI .Ml 

II l-HD-'ACerrrtfUriO 7B5Uirt | MS 
24 l-WA./DCerTi*WJ|-Ch UlUII f 4 4S 
49 0-WA/[fC«irr<¥rt*n6^ WultJ k |.95 
14 1 0-611 o'*Cwi> y^fi.Cwnp 1Q05H| '3 95 
» l-JSriJ'Atwv MiCfa C*np jOM*l| 7 95 
Tl 10>1 D7A CWrwrim 10 HM hPI 1 I 4| 
Tl 10-JM Q/A fekwijf |0 hk lmi | 5.95 
tl 1?-MfrJiC , onw1V |0J!O%Lm | 4.B 

Uuft.C*M- ..79 

U*JITJ7*!^21 3 95 



SPECIAL FUNCTION 

D5D025O( | 9uHH05P<K..rjinW|5U;} 

nsoMftCN i DurMrj5i: .-. ..■ .'■.-• 

'iSi7;:'ii 40 fHperOitft 

HsaHii a - 

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UUU1744I II lltu 
(&PMO.H m Men 

tnd Cmi uai Baw 

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TELEPHOHE/KEYBOARP CHIPS 



*T-J-9i« 
MW4HH 

4^-5-5603 
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HD0165-S 
74C922 

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Pi PijW E-.r.»i rc^pTont tafer 



14 CUQ5 CHtl C#WJl« 

40 Hfrfta'SLXfiWlM^'sl 

?* IMcariGrjpgikj fllkW 

ii WwMM«dir{j|kjM 

H «;iTKiln3friaSir|?Ciuc,-5i 

UMLJ1.J0« 11 Then Tinr Cm* 

UH631KH 20 Puth Butsi Puru Qmi 



NATIONAL EPROM-RAM SALE 

J308-S ?t 10J4iS|SMnsl£FBOW(SMDnilE) S!S5(«tl 

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?I5«0-B 24 I0!4i8 J5G(iJ EPBDM Single +S» ?95«jcH 

;?32-S 24 lOgMliSDmiEPHOM (flbtjfB 

27640 ia B19?*8 H50n5J EPHlll! 19.»g»h 

4164N-? 16 BS.53Bil [200ns| D>fijniic BAM BV6S 95 pr 9 9S uch 

HH5!90-1 16 16 3SJjl i;iDnsi Dtnjm.c IB 3.-10 95 or 1 J? «ch 



CONNECTORS- 



25 Pin - D 5ut™dn.i.!urn(niMts RS232) 
rmrtHiM Mm 



t-i;:*p Piu&in;'232i 

MM5 JtK CJT ilHH) 

OlRtPF-l Tl PLUG i PSJJJl WVn Vi-jp sl r Mi 

B*SI lZt-1 DUUE CUVER ler H2EP tr DI25S 

K74P431 PlUC - fUgW A*B*1 - PC Mom 

01251431 WMt -**M*!tfi-KmM 

D2W14-2 Ttrnr LkJ: k> MTi Ifrtn Cp—rJan 



TrrTTff 1 



Soldar Ey&iet^WifB- Wmp Edye Card 
I «p 



15,'»3E 

ii/an 

2?/44J£ 

22r"*4« 

M/1WSE 

22V44WW 

i793i-S 

R5I1-I 

HI l.J 



n..-:a 
IVM 
22/44 
27/44 
•VtM 
22/44 
22/44 
H/IH 
5CV1U 



c, SE" 



IC SOCKETS m 

for Socket Required. See Column After The IC Part No. 



LOW PROFILE (TIN) SOCKETS 



1-34 



25-49 



TUP 



50-100 



IB] 

14 pi 

15 pin lp 
it pin LP 
M pJn LP 
71 pin LP 
24 pin LP 
21 pjrt LP 

35 pin LP .U .59 5i 

40>plfi LP ,|] ,13 ,(i 

- 5old*rtill SiaMird Tin A fluid Alio Anlldbh — 



J* 
47 



WIRE WRAP (GOLD} SOCKETS 
LEVEL HZ I-Z4 25^b »m 



0-pln WW 

10 cm ww 
14 pin WW 

11 p > r WW 
It pin WW 
20 pin WW 
22 pin WW 
24 t>ln WW 
2| pin WW 
34 pbn WW 
4r0oin WW 



510.00 Minimum Order — u.b. Fundi Only 
Calif urn Fa Residents Add 0^% Sales Tax 
Postage — Add 5% plus $tM Insurance 
Sond S.A.S.E. tor Monthly Safes Flyer! 



Spec Sheels- — 30c each 
Sflnd S1 r 00 PoBlaaa for your 
FftEE 1933 JAMECO CATALOG 

Prices Subjoci la Change 



disco 1 "' 15 _ ■ ST J ,", j Tr. iT) 7j - *'*• "««3 f 

:iw^r^ ••■IllnliWflWI %^ 

13S5 SHOREWAY ROAD, BELMONT, CA 94002 
10/B3 PHOWE ORDERS WELCOME ~ (415) 5928097 



7015IPI 

764SEV/IM" 

71UQPL 

7105CV/M* 
710713FL 
7102IWM- 
7S11C*L 

mrapi, 

7W11V5 
7IC4IPC 

rMH i - 

72D6CJIPE 

■ :<:■.'.* fd 

J207JUtvyiKI1.' 
I20IIFI 
7209IPA 
7J15IPG 

TllbUJI 
22IKUI 

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rUflJ 

Ml7A*1 
7224rPL 

. r J2UUL 

MVK 
7742U4 

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7SWPA 
755**0 

railBLPA 
■'.■:-::.(■>. 

7631 CWE 
764ICOT 

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fwciw 

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£HtflDK>4«C44Hi1fr 

4Func CMOS S*spw4th CUT 
4FvnC 5:w*K!nr>a KTL 
IftpiiUwv C4VAWC4. 
IBJUFfiq CowttifC* 
iDWFrcq CwmvCC 
4 rjvl LEO Uptown faHW C A 

4 Df rl LED UpVFjQ^, c«inr*r C C. 
LCD 414 r*ffl Up Cfc-wit FJfrl 

I Digl Unnr CHUttT 

5 Fl -k^t, CAinttf C rip. KTL 
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CM05 555 T«ar 
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.14 95 
1194 

9» 
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ll » 
2114 
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I2» 



14 SD 
29 « 
24 « 

11 « 
TO IS 
14 H 

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»ts 

74.9S 



524 
145 



2.20 
SMV 2.S 
DMV 2 55 
5MV 3K 

15MV 4 35 




l«.JM£M 
LM.1HN 
LM134I 
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LM33SI 
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LM340K'5 

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LM340K-15 



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SB VOLT CERAMIC DISC CAPACITORS 

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value 


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10 pi 


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n 


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.DOjjjF 


a er 


.01 


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.05 


.004711 F 

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«pf 


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-05 


lOOpr 


.ca 


JGK 


.04 


.D2ZMF 


230 pr 


.&j 


V. 


.05 


J47MF 


4»pr 


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.14 



.LI 



100 VOLT MYLAR FILM CAPACITORS 

.Mini- r |2 .10 0/ I .022mr .13 .Ll .C4 

,0022mr Ai .Id jyj JUTmt Jl J7 .13 

.OWJmf .12 40 ,0T .Imf .27 .23 .11 

rOImr ,11 .Ifl JW | J2mr ,J3 -27 .23 

+20S DIPPED TANTALUMS (Solidf CAPACITORS 



■IfflV 

. 15/35 V Jl 

,22/BV .M 

33fl4V J| 

,47/»V Jl 

,fl/SV .!» 
L0/3SV 



Jl 



LS/HV 
2.2/36V 
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4.J/25V 
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1S/3SV 
22.1V 



.41 J7 
51 ,45 



MINt- ALUMINUM ELECTROLYTIC CAPACITORS 
141 100-494 50QV R»dul L-« 101)44? 500 + 



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22/25V 
22AOV 
42/25V 

4IA0V 

1O0/25V 

JOQflOV 

320/25V 

220/5OV 

470/25V 

li.v-;ILv 

2200/JSV 



.41 -37 J4 



.47/3SV 

-47^0V 
1.4/MV 
L-OyBV 
LftflOV 
4.7/ltV 
4.T/ESV 
4.7/SOV 

lo/ilv 
loyjsv 

IOA0V 
42/SCV 
I00/14V 
1CH/2SV 
3CO/50V 
220/ L4V 
4M/24V 



.17 .IS 44 



CIRCLE 60 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




JE600 
Hexadecimal 
Encoder Kit 

FULL 8-BIT 
LATCHED OUTPUT 
1B-KEY KEYBOARD 



Trie JEGOQ Encoder Keyboarcf Kit provide* two leparaift 

htVtadeelmel rJlplEi produced from Hqumtlil key , "'-' | «i 
to allow direct nragrprT.minn '01 H-tnl micrtiprOLOsinr 
or B'bLr m«mi>fY circuit!. Three additional kayi are pro- 
wlctad tor uter opereitpnt »v»th ort having ■ blttablc 
□ uTplH available. The output* art lalchad ind rYiari i |Or»d 
with LED n«riD<uii. Atio included Is ■ Hey an try tirefa*. 
Feeturei; Full B-bn latched output "far mkropfoeaMor 
upi- Three u »*r ■ Cief | nij Keya i^-th gn( being olitabla 
Op*f4T"On. D*bownE< circuit provided lor alt 1ft Iceyi. 
9 LEO readOuti ID verily *nifi»». Eaiy Interfacing with 
Handera 1«S-plr> IC conn^ior Only + 5VOC required 
for ppautidrt. Sizm: 3>S"H »**"«* BK"D 

JE6 00/OTE-HK }t£XJ!V5'&Xii $99-95 



ir^nrt Lrt* l9" Ka V Ha«4d*c, Keyboard h *cq qc 
JtbuU Ml PC Board tcm.pn.tl. (no cat*) . .<l>39i3a 

K 19 lM<«y Keyboard [Keyboard only) .... $14.95 

DTE-HK lean only -Jft"HxlMt ,r Wx**'-Q|i $44.95 



IIU"LU«"Wt lV"H 



JE610 ASCII Encoded Keyboard Kit 



The JEB1Q ASCII Keyboard KEl can bo interfaced Into 
mon any computer lyitann. The kit ccr--.ni Eun^ploto 
wl-sn an Indurtrlal grade keyboard twitch iinmbiy 
i62-Hev*l, Id. aoeketi. connector, electronic compo- 
nent* and a daublvildad printed wiring board. The 
k«yboerd euembLy require* +5V 9 150mA and — 13V 
•> 10 mA for operation. Feature*, 60 key* generate tha 
126 character*, uppnr B nd Icwfi >?•** ASCII ear, Ftllly 
Quf1*r«d. Two uaar-defina kiyi provided fcr custom 
application Capi lock for uppar-eata-only alpha charge- 
ten, Udlliei a 2376 {40-plnp encoder read-only memory 
chip, Output! directly eomp a tl b la with ttl.dtl or 
MOS logic array*, Easy interfacing, with a Ifi-pln mp or 
1S-pln edge cOnnacTOr. SI to; 3ft" H x 14H"W X 3'i' D 

JE61Q/DTE-AK if&i'JES'ESSi ...$124.95 



IFfiin k-it F"jF** K °yb0iFd, PC Board, * TQ flK 

Jto IU Nit £. Component* {no caic) $ /y.blb 

K62 M-Key Keyboard (Keyboard only) . . .$ 34.95 

DTE-AK ic*»oniy- jwhxu-wj^^'^djS 49,95 



L JEZ12 - Negative 12VDC Adapter Board Kit 

I. It.. ICGtA ftCH^II KCVDrlftOri L'lT LSI*, 



n corn | n g SY DC 



JE215 Adjustable Dual Power Supply 

General Descjipnun. The JE215 ii a Duil Powar 
Supply with independent Jtfjujtible positive and nega- 
tive output voltage*. A icparaie adjusimeni for eaoh 
of the tup plies provides ttie use run I imited application! 
for IC cufft'ir. voltage requirement!. The supply can 
also he used ii a gcrrer/al all-purpose variable power 
supply. 






FEATURES: 

* Adjji1#hl« r«guljit[lf][>rtflr tuppliai, 
pof. and nag. i.JvOC to 15VOC 

* Fower Output laach tuppJy): 
5VDC 9 oOOmA, tOVDC » 750mA, 
12VDCa>arj0mA, and 
ISVOC* 175mA 

» Two, 3 tarminai adj. IC raguntori 
with thermal overload pror,«CEion. 

* r-taev link regulator cooling 
a LED "on" Indicator 

* Prlntad 9oerd Cnnlrucdun 
a l 2QVAC input 

* Sim 3 UT'w x S-1/fS"L k 3"M 



JE215 Adj. Dual Fowtf Supply Kil [lishow^ _ , $24.95 

4Pic(ur* not ihown but aimilar In conitruclion to above) 1 
JE2QQRtg. Pqast Supply K.ttDV DC. 1 nmp> . , $14.95 
JE205 Adapter Srd. (to JE200) tS^S & t12V. , 512,95 
JE210 Var, Pwr- Sply- Kh ( 5-16WOC. to ISamp. . 519 95 



07--T " Ljr* ■ <• WX1 i 



lB>Vt*5W" , Wlf1% , "l 



t 1 *^ 



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SiXrSW'WjIJrl'Hi 



KEYBOARDS — POWER SUPPLIES 



ALPS 26-KEY CALCULATOR KEYBOARD 

TtKwttt -7 PhMh. 3 rutin uH ITttwm lirUtm [OH ram. TMpm in few DUmHTi Taari 

ne iM HfpHtii jm t«tcUm- ^F> t«t* e*ni rm iJn- 

PlriNo.KBZo i1.9Saichrjrg/S3.4S 

MICRO SWITCH 59-KEY KEYBOARD 

Dm Iain- Krpfcwri. Ek«M D«p«t: «-M hoM »t QIC laethui KM inert, 14-ah Eia* 

Cm CtanKDit, Ci |IiiH >«Jt flu caaahtttH. 

Pirl Ho. KBG9501g-2 (flU JRlC DTE-2Q Enclwure] VU.9S MCh 

0ATANETIC5 74-KEY KEYBOARD 

MCI IliriHI Biyi n ri, DvUvl: Ene hrff ASCII. )»h*v n«ftagi *J, -11 nt. hMHi: 

VKtuU SMT - IA-w b—t+*. CwmUm wtk Pie rinirlii 

Pirl ho. KB3M |FHi Inlo DTc^Zu EnClMOB) »9.96 »cii 

MICRO SWITCH BS-KEY KEYBOARD 

Wwf rrKHi*i twflml. nt*l4*twn Chhcoh. Uftn vafew ^5tDC la K»r*HN 

a CWniTT. riiariiil pjt fan kr Carur iM «*m nceitiBf, IMtftw 

PartKc.8SSD1M ■..■,..., tM.aSwtii 

MlCflO SWITCH BS-KEY KEYBOARD [PARALLEL ASCII) 

Dan EUni brhaari «wl hi i ObHi 1MB Tanfcd. aafftf Vribft. tW, -1ZY. - - " j Hal 

IMS - le-fH Ufa Card fimi*i ScMwit Ill, dm HU Eieeiar Chle. 

Part Nl, BBS02Z [f la Iflta DTE-H) Encknurt) t6&.95 ncTi 

POWER S u PPLY - 5VDC @ 1 AMP fl EG OLATED TrwiieeUwi Tech 

DtilfWt *SVD£ G I i"P (Hiu *MTOCMil. I^FUl 11&VAC HXi. Tm-Ihm fbl*Lt.rb*B*f **■ 
«riH*JHH (H.,ln*l. Itack p™»r tftrd )U«: *H"WiT"Eif*"H W HI 

Plrt He. PS511H $13.95 cadi 

POWER SU PPLY - 5Y0C ,. . 5 AH P FECU LATE D ■ i -du nn 1 1 

OaM *3ifOC0T w. +»-«T(K*fl ItvvAnrii-it.JcrriiiCliMi lOl **^. lap* 1 1 S¥*t 
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ee>m Hrikk. K'Ni !*"■ KaVr/ni'«t 7 «*, 

Part Ha. PS4DT0 , . .SZ4.95 each 

POWER SUPPLY - SVDC 1.5 AMP, 12VDC 1.5 AMP SWITCHING 

lnf«l. 1 1 EVAC. Ht-tmt V J BH/ZIBVJIC, Httl a t I HI. f II ntVpanr n r ^t HtoCI nl. 
t**i liiJ/3J*i|ACl. Oaleel UrOG {f 7,» vn, 77VOC e> 1.* *>p I L K. rm. <erl. l^"Wi 
1!d'li WH. Wl. 13k, 

Pan No. PS94VO £-19.95 each 

POWER PAG — W«*r BUY N*l^pian «-*r lafalr - 5V3C. l»Dt. I«0C 

Ciitaol: +JVGCfl 3M. *lrtOC O J*. -13VDC 0> U, i +ItVK 3H Input' EiSVAC. M-, 
eBNU ) M.. in.: . JS*l»llMeH-i»-fllppli l6»V«iklifMkiJHMIIl*JV DHr**l 
tim*.: W, +i», -ltt. haw. aieneL iad IS*"! i » r 'H 1 lMrt"B. Wl. « fct. 
Part Ns, 2B5-Q1B SS9.95 wh 

SDftENSEN Regulated Power Supplies 

SorsnufVs oport cofi&tructlon (SOC) power supplies are> s-eries- 
regulst&dl solichslato aystema, designed to provide rag. DC 
voltages a I € levels (2-2-fl. yliar\Q&). Th«s« units are op«'n>framed 
on sturdy black a nod ire tf aluminum for axcallanl mounting. 

IQtTUUt: xnnHtmtK Ih«I 9 H-UJHt Unr Ufeh; !.}>Vr«, Salf f.p 
] Ut. Vribft u>itBHiN wart. JVJ """ 



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Powertec Sub-Modular DC Power Supplies 

SH Sarlas power supplies Include roctJIylng. Nllvrlng, 
r»gulaiing, overload and ovarvoltagu protaction funtiionsL. You 
nead only connaot the sub-cnoditlQ to the appropriate secondary 
transformer tap and bdl the unll to a heatalnk. 

EffllJUTWIt: LINE. I0S, l» I tMftJI Irtn -HV H « MX Maalrttiaa. LOJU). ,1SX hriiO-1M>i 
hed EHRfi lm*i bmw 9V nripttl nMMi sv ngUMH] DdlTfuT limi. ImV IKS. lev r-P 
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5002 Series — 0.43 Inch — 7-S*amflnl 



Pill 



50E2-?6i3 
50B2-7B51 
50S2-7B53 
5032-7656 
M8Z-7K0 
5082-7661 
5082-7663 
5082-7670 
5082-7671 
506!-7673 
5082-7676 
5082-7750 
5062-7751 
5062-7756 
50B2-7760 



Cotor 



Hi £11 Rwl 

Hi Ell Red 

Hi EH RM 

HI EI1 Red 

Veiinw 

fallow 

Vtitow 

Grten 

GiHn 

Grtsn 

Green 

Red 

Red 

Red 

Red 



Diicriptlon 



0A-LHD 

CA • RHD 
CC - RHD 
CrarllcwilRHD 
M - LH0 
CA - RHD 
CC - RHD 
CA - LHD 
CA- RHD 
CC - RHD 
Oven low ±1RH0 
CA -LHD 
CA • RHD 
Overflow ±1 RHD 
CC ■ RHD 



SALE 

PRICE 



4/12.49 
4/S2.40 
4/SZ49 
4/S2.49 
4/S2.4S 
4/S2.4S 
4/J2.49 
4/ $2,49 
4/S2.49 
4/(2.49 
4/K.4S 
4/(2.49 
4/(2.49 
4/(2.49 
4/(2.49 



CA.CHMnm.Anod. CC-Comm. Cithftdt LH DrBHD'UII/rlfllil hind d«j. 




UTIC . . 

Mini Stereo^WlV 
AM/FM J°iO$r 
Receiver %Oa^p\ 



Udd 



FEATURES: Liflhtweiigrit nesdphones. Letter ight 
iroL "" 



rrigh 
Ac a i 



balance coniroL Full fidelity stereo sound. 

tional blacksott cairying- case & shoulder strap. Boll 
Clip ihgrvjs Tree). Operates on 3 AA cell batteries (nol 
Incl.). Compact size: 3'^"' K *%" x 1"- Wt. 6 oz. 

S. Model 2830 .$29.95 



• SHIPMENT IN 24 HOURS * 
!&. 7:00AM to 5:00 PM (PST) |W £ 
r^- Call: (415) 592-8097 ^> 



JUMPER AND CABLE ASSEMBLIES 

STANDARD DIP JUMPERS 

inn uit Itirr prol.ii cjiii piugri wth hairy Av\f 



B%" Mini- Floppy Disc Drive 

FOR TAS-SO MOOEL i. in ilmkntty £lan»ard> 
Faaturait iingta or d«ubla dAAirly. RaootKllrio 
mod*- FM *injfl*e, MFM *cu&lfl Cnr.vlj 
Pvttv. * lIVDC ■ : 6V' 1.6 ampa nrujx , 
SVDC liDAV) D.B anyn man. Ume aa pic- 
ri; r«d 1 1 leri idoa* nol i Mi cam, powar tu^plv 
C-" eatHtaftl HOpopi daia boa*, mclj^-rd 
WoiDEia J4 pOynJl. Sn». 1^"W 1 H"D n 

P-flKc. t4BilfMOl«llfll 7 r p^ 

FDa» S179.95 

Shtola.Hdad, 40 blrtfke, 250K bybai cipaeJIv 

FD2M 5199,95 

Ctouhla -iikfad. 3S Ir^cha, *»K hjba* citp»clly 



EXPAND YOUR TRS-80 



■SeiSs 



r:-.-.. - 



«M I0J 1 1 

»m«j4 

171 IE* LI 
i:cs*-4 
bii4}M IhiHM 

ejii i iHiiiu 

vmi *]■«'■ 7 4* 

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DJl* J"t «r4-ri:* 

BJ1-.111. i>HiJi 

DS4 II IWUl.ll 

QJM1 »J*iJJfi 

EUMJ ihius 

DJH I H H417I 17 

DJT*1I* »Ml)tJ>1 
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44 
44 
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■MM4I4 H* 
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STANDARD 0525 SERIES CABLES 



STAhDfct&CJtSLlS 






Aim 

4 'Ml 



i 01351" I 1*5 *i 
I DISSS 10*5 »» 

7UB2SE lit! ii. 



510.00 Minimum Order — U.S. Funds Only 
California Resldanti Add 6Vi% Sales Tax 
Postage — Add S% pluc 51. 50 Insurance 
Send s.A.S.r:. ^or Monthly SaSos FfyBri 



Spec Sheets — 30* each 

Send $1.00 Postage lor your 

FRE£ 19S3JAMEQO CATALOG 

Price* Subjetf to Change 




ameco 



ELECTRON CS 



rl**« I7HWJ 



1355 SHOREWAY ROAD, BELMONT, CA 94002 
PHONE OflDERS WELCOME - f41SJ 592-8097 




IB 16K. 32 K. H UK 
il 1 - Fun 4K Ii 16K Reqglrtl ft) Dm Kit 
il 3 - from IK le 4IK Rlqulm (3) Three Kill 
From <K lo 1CK Require! (1) Dm Kit 
cam** tmi w » *K t« m i n . m 



TRS-80 1EK Cnmersion Kit 



Kit nanes complete with 8 each MM 5290 I UPD4 16/41 16) I6K 
Dynamic RAM (*ri3) and documentation tor conwarslon. 

THS-1BKZ *150m (16.9S 

TRS-16K3 -200m (14.95 

TR5-16K4 "260fll (10.95 



TRS-80 Color 32K Conversion Kit 



Kit comas complete with S ea 4T64-2 {JOOns). 64K Dyn, RAMs 
£ canve/skm docunwntalian. Zomttis IPS- SO color centpuiers 
with E-RevrsiDn flairds (fom 16K to 3?K. 
TflS-SWZ irw«n 5GB.95 



Universal 




Computer Keyboard Encloture 



ni£- BUni 0ni.lv 



^"X 1 «™ P«tri in »n«nj trPM nflewl 

V'V* S»Jaj riannttneni pinai br nrwt/ 
r^* EPnponenJ j««i tcp^kci amtD «0" 



ICnHcfe) trip moMc^Dn 



D 



Pee Wee Boxer Fan 

* 3Sclm Iree as/ delivery 

■ 3.12S" so- 1 1.665" deoih 

■ 10 vis. conl. duly 91 20 'C 

■ 1 15V 50/60HI 

» For Apple users 

PWSJIOJUSKiw ( 7.S5M. 

PWS2107F »™ (12.95 ta. 






Muffin 6 Fan 

. 105erm tree air delivery 

• 4.6S" sd. « 1-SO" denlh 

• 10 yre. conl. duty at 20 'C 

• Impedance protected, 
ainc-leme to 70 *C 

■ 1 15V 50/SOHz 14W Wt 17 04 
MU2A1-U SSJita ■ * *-95 ee. 
MU2A1-MI.™ (12.85 m. 



JOYSTICKS 




5K Lin 

rajnrP£ii_ 



,r 1n nir 1 nD ^ Linear 

J4 " 1 uu * IlMiraii (4.95 



k i^nv Ui:y ' t-inear 
J5 ' 15BK T apir Pal; 



ivr an * aK 121 video Con- 
J,l, " u iro.lcr .n Case . 



UV-EPROM Eraser 

| a Chipt — 51 Minutes I », "^ 



I i Chip - 37 Mlmi.qa | 

I Ernai iTfja, Jlitj. 2^1?. 3J154, i*i a, 35H, 3Sfti. Emai up laaehlpa 
wl lh in Si mrriulai |1 nh-p Ire 3J* mjnuia«|. alplnialna conalanl ntpwura 
dlilarKa or one Inch. Special conduclira leam llnar alimlnaiai itnlc 
frjiitf ifp. DuUMn Mlaly leek Ed prannl UV txpottt*. Compact — only 
•-DD* ■ 3,70' p 3.tD-. Cwnpieie wlln h-sfrjiofl Iray rsr ■ ehipt 

UVS-11 EL Replacement Bulb -16.95 



DE-4 



UV-EPROM Eraser . 



s 79-95 



^r% 



Wall Transformers 
AC and DC Types 



Inpm 



AC KG (iTMrval 117VJMHS 

AC 500 -l.'V.DM: 

AC1AO0 HTV/MHi 

ACin» ilTVrMHi 

ACWH «17V,'K1HI 

DC HO (MVi'MHi 

DCWt2 '::■■-■ iMIir 

DVSJte ITTV/«rtT 

CC*» WVi'HMr 

0C129D ::OV.'6i3H 






12VAC2SflmA I~ 3j 

UVACKflmA H.H 

UVACIamp IUS 

9V*Ce.j"j|mp Ul« 

i.svac LSamp ja-isoa-m ,ai 
avoc -MOmj, tui ™ anzsi 

6.4,12V DC 300mA . ,&.*& 

9.SV-DC JJSmA 5J 4» i r M3.B5 

WDCMOfnA ujs 

1 2V &C HOaail SJ.IS M irt4,.M 



'l^MOTWTOLA AM/FM Stereo 
.^^^ Push Button Car Radio 




FQ* WLKSWAGEN SCIHDCCO. HAfliIT r AUDI SOOrJ AnQ FOX 

Kidudei baiat Wm A tjTtvr^hina p<Utr*l Tn*qM.4:>l tptmktn Aorilt 
(■ ir, » dwpi. AH rjkt-n A taada ka hook 441, awl, . " ' 
r* mi/ bFM-laqat&fk Cul*jl(l*Tn.:7'W * i 1 .. r H k-B'.j L 

Model SVW3901 .... 



S49.95 



O 
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m 

DO 

CD 

CO 

to 



CIRCLE 60 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



173 



BEC BILLET ELECTB9IIC9 

P.O. B0X401244R GARLAND, TX. 75040 [214} 278-3553 



Sound Effects Kit $18.50 





AS LfmB' i 
■ Dtp'. 

'Qtt'W JTp Villi orifp i 
C0f\1t£t*2 'a rour aiai 

i™;iii*w3| 71*77 li tack 



VCO NatH On* SIMM and 
En^fippf Cvmci A Ovid Op 
J,mp iC m ui>0 la impifrriCTt 

in Ad^jjlib'* PulM OrtPI' 
Ipi L-HH Compamw *n«l 

■nari lllMIHi Th4 J - ■ i 

l*E Boj'S ft ilyi rt *t v =lrtyp« 

1*1 19 P'ltfw Iff vW HIM 

cere mlrjr Eai' t P'c^'jt-"*^ 
■A duplicit* E ■ p>fo ■ i c-n ■ 
PfcMdt Cvm SI**** Trims, v 
MTiHI in in-hn.li, lyr-ib*. rjl 
olnir' KHinA I -: iM hii J 
moil pH' 0+ ipp-cHiani Ir-ie 
low pn;i T^sfciOfli. *M wit 
liii picjqrjmnnaig cJiirli inp drli.ieg J'&*?"f -cmp 
■t rum vi >V barrary mar .nieuerai On ba*io 
.11 dim x im*!i ipfaisi ttmidlv 0- thf un.l can m 
hin i«Krt4<Di« **fc.rji* iSp"*."* not 



. ;■■- , I.; H Ij r 



7 Watt Audio Amp Kit $6.95 

SMALL, SINGLE HYBHITJ IC AND COMPONENTS FIT ON A 2" 
x 3" PC BOARD (INCLUDED*, flUNS ON tZVDC. GREAT FOR 
AhlV PROJECT THAT NEEDS AN INEXPENSIVE AMP. LESS 
THAN 1 3.'» THD @ S WATTS. COMPATIBLE WITH SE-01 
SOUND KIT. 



The 

Super Music 

Maker 




OWTHi *,"■■ 25 ptd-progrunm>4 



On board 7 -watl unpF<r-*r drn-aa I 
ip*akar dnaerly 



«* mihw 3ft«Of 271 B EPflOM 
aupandcti luna pianino eapabil- 
-Ijf Li*Hno avariablt p r* - P rofl r 1 m nttd 
ROtfi 

A true etatlrisnie munc m*kar bamd an » micinOpf oc#tM» chip Tht SgpH HUHC Miliar 11 IF* 
gnhy fcn urn ■dibwx Miy addition ol pr^-pT'Pgmmrwci !urn» 6? plugging in ana nrhWiwy chip 
|ftOM| Ch*r meilisranl fiOM»*ilPiO*Bf 5Wlwi*lli'ii(*l«lillH UMHHlLllfOfilCwHam, 
D*»rb#n, Dear Announcnf . *Hc H you hart an EPFIOM p*-&jramm«* ou muiLi al Ml* you how 
is progei-m irour own lunH Kit tWMhi. rjudity piatad and «nii«d PC Board ml «Jl 



OPTIONAL ACCEf SOPLIE1 
DIP SWITCHES On«f pHH.H3n>aP4«. norluiMKHrcwi 

WALlPLUS TBANtFflfilaER For op*nn*Mi o*i H7VAC houu -ainmnl 3J0 

INJECTION MOLDED PLASTIC CA1E ■w-CUltOm flOnl A IW pfwh hardware 

■Ad 2 toe pot io\ Mti i*HchM {rapUcM DIP Awiietwi) . , (,M> 

HQflN WEAKER fl wjll 4 CMsin Mlh nwMmlJiig bf-cktl LB 

SPECIAL OFFER 
fiuy * SuJH> Huiuc MftktJr kll Inr J?* S5 rod 3*1 FflE E. ft 2TW ROM prv-prOgi-Arnirwd *.lh 35 
popular lun** Thu ■firrer giv*i yo-j cntr BO aongi bo choo»* iram' 

Doomsday Alarm Kit $9-95 

ll you riwn trauH* sleeping and yvu would Ifta in« real of ih» ntighPDfhDOd to iharaypuf 
nuiory di«n inn i> ii'fl kj| wilt r-fl for ytw 1 ihc. i no wiy to «ti,m»ly date nb« lha uiHajtMy 
no-n-l*. KftarntiM t«M»ihat ccnauutor urn hi) Four if-pipata lona aKillaccr* arvmixad, 
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VDC ORDER DA-OS 1 



Si 



HOG WASH!!" 



TH£ PRESIDENT SAYS. 

Attar taking one look at (he TRIPUT POWER SUPPLY our engineer dffclarucf Itrai (hn 
units were worth soucral. hundred dollars eech. He pointed out ihe engmeermrj, rugn quairy 
construction and slate-of-thovartiritBrg rated design in support of his position. The President 

of BEG more pragmatically pom lad out the already full warehouse and the two trailer truck 
oadsof power supplies wailing in the parking lot. and set tne_o_rice to move Ihem QUICKLY! 

62.50 

Plui $5.00 Freight 
-1ZV fj 5A 
INPUT IDS - 125VAC 



* UNIT is CQianjTULT ASKUILED* 

* Fum pni*wy tM K tHM 

* MUge EHIILEMO TrtAr.tr OnuLH 

- S% U«H l Imm W mua imi 

- LOv 1^)04 <ltifrn*' 

* IV C ■■•:(. 1 Ptd4*c1ie4I 



3 OUTPUTS 

12V ® EA 112* Ini.J 




*04rtoo»fnrdeHliiHfi 

- i ■ -i ■, r i ., -.■ ii. | SwIMrlna 



* iil iLEJl |JJ 
ONE TIME OFFEftl UNIT TWO (2) SUPPLIES PER CUSTOMER. 



COMPLETE UNtT 

1A( you r*earv0 ilf 



* COD MINIMUM i»« * ADD M.» FOR COD'S 

* UP* DELtvEBT- ADDHtSs MUST ACCOMPANY ALL COD 
DRDER3 

■ 11,00 HANDLING ON ORDERS irMD£Rf10L« 
- VISA, HC CAR09 OR CHECK 

* ADD** FDR SHIPPING 

* TEXAS RESIDENTS ADD &•» STATE VALES TAX 

* ALL FQREION ORDERS ADD 25'V FDR SHIPPING 
jCAMADA ISM NO FOREIGN COO'S 

* CAlX QM) 37A-»» TO PLACE CREDIT CARD OR COD 
ORDER 



HITECH KITS 

EDUCATIONS IK HHIURt FUN TO BUILD 6ND USE 



LCD Multimeter 

Tr,*- il-k-idab'e LCD Muhimelw High accuracy 19 
S3 *" .jng* largjt 3^ digit DMM wiltt d.odr l*St auie 
"X- poltnly and LO Baci. indicjicf . Fully Aaiantb L ad. 

Medal 10i SS9 « 9V Biciat .aO.ftG 



D-50V 3A Regulated 
Adjustable Power Supply 

With CfMflrlfMd pvolreUan arm LED 
pn^aroAindicilor. A»«m 12 9 50 
HKIT-B01 Kji 624,50 





30W Single Channel Power Amp. 

Cempaci power amp wUh voJumi-. treble 
ii»d ban central. £nea<l+n! for fi&o»invg lha 
powir of your pn'tjble- iadlOi, OC :ns*i:r 
Connc-crlovour TVimd'OiniJiripcnn-nci the 
real iiMind. o( youi TV program 
HKIT-300 A«m S3i » Kit£1».9$ 



Programmable MtisiG Door-hell 

Elcatrpnic tfnai-ball i]kH hai9 piooranunibla lonaa 
Uica CMOS for low powar conjumpHon pnd tvgi 
auto jhuinli ieaiura. 



HKIT.A7A 



?i^t 

7 Diolt 

Universal Counter 

UnNc-nil Cauntar ceunti up 
IP 60 WHr and 10 fflirliorr 
avfl-npt. 7 lorga 5" digits 
, CnriEal Miif b»a. High oar- 



KIT-I 



K« S49 SO 



Ai-tm sie.ea 

Kit $-12.60 

|$VBatL$D9G] 




Tmstimarx fw IQb 

HKnr-33A S7.M HKlT-300 SlD.BO 
HKlT-BGA SS.9& HK9T-a03 S12.S0 



0-35V ZA Quality Power Supply 

Pfcrvid*!. 4 rHtgatoF turrant limning upio ZA 
Un» PFttumn ragulatren md pswc lunaii- 
tor bootTii Aaam $24.50 

HK4T-B3A krt$IS.BO 



Triple Output Power Supply 

+BV & i_BAid* logic <:rKu»ta*n(l±l2ve 1A 
tef Iiiihi frirswili Et1 9Vcr±1SV ivtui- 
ablfl. «pflciJv with flirfm). 
HKIT-12S KitS17.» 

Aiim $20.95 
•7 .30 



FuRdlon Generator 

Gc-criics inangle, aquata or una 
WW*. 1 H,. to >00 ICH1h Idtal Tar 
ttilinij audio, jmpi Aiim S3E.S0 
HKIT-SS KitSZS.SO 

To Order, r.rml check ur money order lo: 

Hitech Electronics 

4415 W SaoulvQLla Blvd., Tarrancs CA 90505 
Phone Orders; {213} 371-2160 

VISA and M/Cwatcomcd. Minimum Ordar S9.00 
Shipping and Handing S2.00. CAraridDnl add BS tut 
PLEASE VISIT OUR STORE. Opan 1000 flOO Man Thru Sat 
SokiiJ di»catMTti vv^sfUb Ed fcdu£*t>4ral TOtrtutonri Dnalw nquirwIF mrtud 




CIRCLE 90 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



74LS SERIES 



LSOO 


.2* 


LS02 


.24 


L.SC4 


.24 


LS05 


.24 


Lsoe 


.24 


LS10 


.24 


LS14 


.S3 


LSJO 


.24 


LS27 


.ZA 


LS30 


.24 


LS3Z 


36 


LS42 


.49 


LS74 


.44 


L5S5 


.IS 


LS86 


.39 


LS90 


11 


LS109 


LS123 


.95 



LSI 25 


.95 


L5243 


1.79 


L^13» 


.75 


L5244 


.95 


LS139 


.75 


LS245 


1.S9 


LSI51 


.7S 


LS257 


,80 


LS153 


.75 


LS2S6 


.4* 


LS15* 


1.75 


LS2S3 


.95 


LS157 


.75 


LS290 


1.20 


LS16 1 


.95 


L5293 


1.79 


LS164 


.95 


L_S29B 


.99 


LS166 


1.95 


LS367 


.69 


LSa75 


.89 


LE369 


.69 


LSieu 


1.99 


LS373 


.99 


LS192 


89 


LS374 


1.69 


LS193 


09 


1^377 


1.40 


LS22i 


1.10 


LS390 


1,79 


LSZ«0 


.95 


L5393 


1.79 


LS241 


.95 


LS399 


1.59 


LS212 


1.79 


LS6 7 


2.10 



ORDER TOLL FREE 

(800) 538-8800 



UPGRADE 

YOUR 

APPLE 

or 

TRS-SO 

4116 200ns 

8/10.95 



ALL MERCHANDISE IS 100% GUARANTEED 



EPROMS 

1702 (Ins) 3,00 

2708 (45(15) 2.99 

2716 <5v 450ns) 3. 95 

2716-1 (5v 350nl) 8.50 

2532 J5v 450ns 8,95 

2732 (Sv 450ns 8.95 

2764 (Sv 4S0ns) Call 

DYNAMIC RAMS 



4027 |2S0ns) 2 00 

4116 1 20 Oris: 130 

4116 (150ns) 1.75 

4164 (SOOriSI Call 



STATIC RAMS 



2101 

21L02 

2111 

2114 

2114L-3 

2H4L-2 

TMM2016 

TMM2016 

HM61 16 

HM6116 

HM6I 16 



[450ns) 

(250ns LP 

(450ni) 

(450ns 

1300ns LP 

(200ns LP 

(200ns) 

(150ns 

(200ns) 

150ns) 

1120ns) 



1.85 
1.55 
2.49 
1.9S 
2.25 
2.30 
9.00 
11.00 
Call 
Call 
Can 



LP = Low Power 



I/O IVOsVU Computer Product), Inc. 

3250 Keller Straet, *9 

Santa Clara, CA 95050 

IBOOr 538-8800 

Calif. Residents (4081 9880697 



MICROPROCESSOR 
REALTIME CLOCK 

MSM 5832 
6.90 



IC Sockots ST Vim 



8 PIN 
14 PIN 
16 PIN 
IB PIN 
20 PIN 
22 PIN 
24 PIN 
28 PIN 
40 PIN 



.10 
.12 
.15 
.20 
.25 
.2S 
,2S 
.35 
.40 



.49 

.50 

.57 

.85 

,99 

1.30 

1.40 

1,50 

l.SO 



ST = 
W/W 



SolderUi! 
• WirewrJP 



280 

ZB0 A CPU 5,4 
ZSO A PIO 5.45 

Z80 A CTC 7.0 

Call for Complitt Lilt 



6500 



6502 

6502A 

6504 

6505 

6507 

6520 

6522 

6532 

6551 



6.90 
9.45 
6.90 
7.65 
9.90 
4.JS 
9.90 
13.95 
11.75 



DISKETTES 
5%" 
ATHANA 
SS 5D Soft 23 

WAS ASH 

5S SO Son 23 

VERBATIM 

SS DO Son 28 



MISC. 
Ditc Controller 



1771 
1791 
1793 
1797 



18.95 
34.35 
34.95 
49.95 



Uarti 



AY3-1014 5.B5 
AV5-1013 3,90 
AVS-2376 12.00 

TR 1602 4.25 



Interface 



8T26 
8T28 

BT95 
ST 96 
ST97 

8T9B 

DM8131 

OS8S3G 



1.65 

1.95 

.95 

.95 

.95 

.95 

2.90 

1.25 



16K APPLE 
RAM CARD 

Upgrade your 48K Apple It 
to full 64K 

BARE BOARD 24.00 

KIT 49.00 

ASSEMBLED & TESTED 69.00 



VISIT OUR RETAIL STORE 
AND RECEIVE A 5% DISCOUNT 1 



CRYSTALS 



32.768 KHZ 

1.0 MHZ 

1.B432 

2.0 

2.097152 

2.4 S76 

3.2768 

3.579545 

4.0 

5.0 

S.06SS 



1.90 
4.50 

4.50 
3.90 
3.90 
3.90 
3.90 
3.00 
3,00 
3.00 
3.90 



5.185 

5.7143 

6.SS36 

6.0 

10.0 

14.31818 

18.0 

18.432 

20.0 

22.1184 

32.0 



3.90 
3.90 
3.90 
3.00 
3.00 
3.90 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.90 



CONNECTORS 



F1S 232 
PS 232 
PS 232 



Male 3.00 

Female 3.50 
Hood 1.20 



Call or write tor prices on 

8000, 680O, CMOS, Crystal, 
Linear, TTL, 74's. 



BA'.AAMERiCJBn 



master chaige] 



TERMS: For shipping include S2.00 lor UPS 
Ground. $3.00 for UPS Blue Label Air. SIC 00 
minimum order. Bay Area residents add 6*., Sal as 
Tex. California residents add 6% Sales Tex We 
reserve the right to limit quantities end substitute 
manufacturer. Prices subject to change without 
notice. Send SA5E for complete list 



CIRCLE 74 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



When QUALITY counts 

...at competitive prices. 



• • • 



OSCU.0SCOPE V-KUOF 



\yx/v< 



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1 


h& £ 




1 ' om • 



Hitachi 

V-1050F 

lOOMHz, QUAD TRACE 
DELAYED SWEEP 



Channel 1 Output for OVMor 
DMM Large, Brighi 8 X 1 CM 
Screen 

• 1 1 ii>li Accuracy ±2* (+ 1 to 
+35 P C) 

• I ligli Sensitivity: 500«V/dtV (5 
MHz) 

• Alternate Time Base Operation 

• Automatic Focus 

• Variable Hold-off 
Full TV Triggering (H,V) 
20 MHz Bandwidth Li miter 
Delay Line for Viewing Leading 
Fdgc of Signal 

• X - Y Operation (GH 1 : Horiz., 
CH 2; Vert.) 

■ Trace Finder 





V-509 Delayed Sweep DC-50 VHz 
Mini-Portable Dual Trace 

FEATURES: • 3.5" Rectangular CRT. •Sensitivity 
1 mV/div. (10 MHz) • Sweep Times to 10 ns/div. • 
Individual Sweep Time Controls (A, B), • Full TV 
Triggering (H, V) • CH I Siena! DVM Output • 
Single Sweep • Variable Hold-ofT • X - Y Display 
Mode 'Three Way Power Supply • Optional Battery 
Pack Available 



V-209 DC-20 MHz 
Mini-Portable Dual Trace 

FEATURES: • 3.5' 1 Rectangular CRT • High Sensi- 
tivity (ImV/div. at 10 MHz) -Fast Sweep Times 
(5 Ons/div.) 'Accuracy ±3* (+ 10 to 35°C) »Z Axis 
Input • X - Y Display Mode • Auto Focus * Three Way 
Power Supply - Take Anywhere • Full TV Triggering 
* Human Engineered Front Panel • Calibrator 0,5 V 
±1* 



FROM THE SOUTHWEST'S OLDEST HITACHI DISTRIBUTOR 



IFLUKEI 



DMM'S 

11-802 Multimeter 
Shown 




SURGE 
STOPPER 



Protect Your 

Solid State Equipment 

IIL Listed 

MD6-3; MD4-3 Shown 



SJB DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 




10520 PLANO ROAD, SUITE 206 
DALLAS, TEXAS 75238 



4 



CALL TOLL FREE: 



800-527-1893 (OUTSIDE TEXAS) 
800-442-1048 (TEXAS) 
214-343-1328 (DALLAS) 



cion c go nu cdcc lUEnnuftTinM nnn 




Brand New Micro Computer 
Power Supply 



* Switching regulator 

■ Multiple DC outputs. 
4 5V4A -12V 1A 

+ 12V1A -2.2to15VQ.5A 
' Fiberglass PCB 

■ Over-voltage protection with IC monitor 

• 110/220 V input 

' Factory assamfrle- 
" Circuit diagram av. 

{for a copy, se- i ■ *■ ressed stamped 

envelope) 
' 549.00 each. Freight prepaid 

(Calif resident pis add S3 sales tax) 




Model A501 Power Amp 

■ Pure Class A 26 W t 25 W 

' Switchable to Class AB 100W + 100W 

' Switchable lo Bridge Class A 10GW mono 

' Switchable to Bridge Class AB 300W mono 

" Frequency Response 5-ZOOKHi (-1dB) 

* Signal-to-Noise Ratio 120dB 

* Non-magnetic Chassis 

• "Out-board" comprehensive protection 
circuitry 

' OC circuitry with limited use of NFB 

• High Efficiency Fluid Convection Coolinq 
' THD under 0.007% 




FUJITECH AUDIO KITS 



LATEST AUDIO TECHNOLOGY 
FROM JAPAN 

Send $5.00 for each assembly manual, 

refundable with order. 

Monarchy Engineering, Inc. 
380 Swill Avenue, Unit 21 
South San Francisco, CA 94080 

Visa or Mastercharge acceptable. 



$299.00 



Model A502 DC Stereo Control Center 

■ Direct DC coupling from input to Output 
" DC servo circuitry 

■ Cascade FET Input In alt stages 

' Separate Moving Coil RIAA amplifier 

* Distortion below 0.005% (3V) 

" Max Output 15V 

' Frequency Response 20Hz-20KHz ±0.2 dB 

' Maximum Phono Input 

MC = 16mv RMS (1KHi) 

MM = 270mv RMS (1KHz) 
" Built-in Headphone amplifier 

■ Relay Output Muting J IT ONLY 

$349.00 



XX.T*? 



$349.00 



CABLE TV 



CONVERTERS 
DESCRAMBLERS 

Largest Selection 
of Equipment Available 

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fh 



36 channel 
converter 

$4595 



36 channel 

wired remote 

converter 

only 

$8fl95 




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of converters and unsc ramblers 

Qujinlily Discount • Vi*a « Master Charge 
Add 5^ shipping— Mich, residents add 4^n sales tax 



C&D Electronics, Inc. 

P.O. Box 21, Jenison, MI 49428 
(616) 669-2440 



r^lSSro 



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The Source for Quality at Low Cost 



Silicon 
H.V. Tri piers 

HIGH VOLTAGE 
MULTIPLIERS 




SYLVANIA Triplets 



ECG-500A 

212-139 

212-139-01 

212-139-02 

s 12 85 ea. 



ECG-523 

212-141 
212-141-01 

s 15 00 ea. 



ECG-526A 

212-141-02 
212-141-03 
212-141-04 

s 16 a9 ea. 



REMEMBER! 

Sylvania 

Tubes 

70% + 10% 

OFF 

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Sylvania ECG 
Replacement 
Semiconductors 
and Components 

Full line in stock. 
The best quality 
semiconductor. 



RG-59/U75 0HM 
Co-Axial Cable 



s 44 so /1000ft. 



Bare copper 
conductor 

Copper Braided copper sawd 
Shield , j 

White or Black ^^^^^™T 

Foam polyeltiylene 
dielectric 



@s»o 



F-69 Connector 

with Separate Ferrule 

lDi/100 lot 



MT-1 



Matching Transformer 
75-500 Ohm 

59* ea. $44°°/ 100 



2 Way - 75 Ohm Coupler 

MT-2 $t 4 'ea. $89°»/100 




2SC1172B 

S-J99 



VERY POPULAR 



80 MFD x 450 Volts... .99 
100 MFD x 450 Volts...1.09 



SOLDER 



(60/40 Rosin Core) 
1 lb.-.062dia. 
(regular size) 

$788 SOL-1 



SOLDER WICK 99* „. 
Solder Remova I S W-5 p»l 

»" Wide (Thick Type>-5 feet 1 -«=^ 



SILICON RECTIFIER 2.5Amp/10O0PIV 

100/ s 9» 5 SL-ioo — m 



GLOBAR DISC ■ 120 Ohms Cold 
107191 RCA 



20 Ohms Cold **>, 

99* d^£) 



10 A5S0RTEDCIRCUIT BREAKERS 
10/$7 9fl Good Assortment 



CHEATER CORDS 

Polarized C Clip 
Price: 39t 24620 

Standard C Clip 
Price: 39C 24623 



REPLACEMENT RODS 



4 Section LAM 69c 
SSectionLAR-S B9C 

5 Section LAR-G 99C 
7 Section LAR-7 99C 



G.E. OM-300 



S-149 



PANASONIC OM-500 

fe 

S-|59 



ELECTRONICS 

770 Amsterdam Awe., New York, NY 10025 

»*- Also ask for Free 100 Page Catalog 



Send Purchase Order, Check or Money Order 

or Call Toll Free 800-223-0826 

in NY STATE (212) 865-5580 
All ORDERS SHIPPED UPS/COD F.O.B., N.Y.C. 



MASTERCARD* VISA 



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!■■■■■■■■ 









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f $ FORMULA INTERNATIONAL INC. 

^jji» 12603 CRENSHAW BOULEVARD • HAWTHORNE CALIFORNIA 90250 • (213) 973-1921 



GOOD NEWS FOR HI-FI NUTSI 
j Introducing our TA'200O 200 watte PP Super Miner 

1 -"'.ill ■■■■!"[ ■ '•■■■■ 

I By using four stage* of modem P.P. Super Mirror Circuit 
ITHD and TIM are Kept under 0. DIX at rated output 1 
| SPECIF ICATI ON S. 200 W RMS into * Of 9 ft 

* Q (O lIH.mQ H: fat l* r *0dB, - 1dB 

i s/H batter than 1 0dd B 

■ L09* Irian D.OI'i lOlal Harmonic DlslorWon. 



MODEL TA-2000 
583,95 por kit 




OUR PHICE H9,S0 

additional M.-rcphonr 

(Trenamltler \ Available 

AT 5 Sfl-.M Mich 

MLJRA WM5-W 



CRYSTAL. CONTROLLED 
Wl fl ELESS MICRO PHQN F 
SYSTEM 
Tiansmrlter FET nit lor ftet 
SOHi ISKKz re*p ... .:■ '■;.,! 
controlled 49 MHi AM Band 
tar drift- f rso performance 100 
MWeulput [range appro* 
'A mile| fpr reliable 
Inn-fj range trans- 
mission. Powered 
by a 9V radio bat' 
lurv ]included| 
Receiver: X'tal 
controlled lock* 
on 49 MHz irentminer signal. On pinal VU matar» mw 
itor* (hg signal strength from Iha microphone. Standard 
phone jeok outlet connection to a P. A or r> 1 1 1 ■: i phone 
input 9V bal tery included . this profcSsi On a I Sat IS id US) f Or 
on stape. in held, church, in house c-i outdoor use 




SANYO UHF VARACTOR TUNER 

FOR UHF CHANNEL 14-83 

Tuning vpltage + 1-+2BVOC Input impedance 7511 IF 

bahd Width 7- 1 CM Hi lYos c figure 1 1 5d B Max Size tt%" > 

IWnr Supply voltage 1SVDC Sound lf=5fi 0MH* 

MuJ;l 1 IBB-403A, Video 1F B2 6MHi 

Modal 11&-B-40&A Video it 45 QMHz 

535 00 aa. 

Tunar n Iha mail important pari c-f Una circuit. Don t Ie1 
those S19. DO tuners 1-L-ui you. 

AH unite are brand now from Sanyo. Whan ordeung please 
speedy modal 




REGULATED DUAL VOLTAGE SUPPLY KIT 
±10-30 VDC i-' 2&Q m « adjuitabla. fully regulated Kit 
includes all electronic parts, 1 liter capacitors. IC't. heat 
sinks and PC Board 

312 SO par kit 



MARK IV — IS STEP 
LED POWER LEVEL INDICATOR KIT 

Thii new stereo level indicator kit consists u1 .36 4-coloi 
LED's fl S per channel' tp indicate 1he sound level output ol 
>■■"«■■■ iiiipliiir- from -36dE tp ■ 3dB C-^nwi with a well 
designed silk screen printed pla.alie panel and has a selector 
switch to aEloWllaatingcr gradual output indicating Power 
supply 41 6-t2VOC wUhTHG pn board inputcansiirvity L-pn 
trols This unil tan work with any amplilur from 1W in 
Z0GWT Kit includes 70 pes driver translator*, 39 pea 
matched 4- color LEO'S, all Other eleclrc 
PC Board and front panel 

MARK IV KIT 
S3 1.50 




NEW ARRIVALS 



PROFESSIONAL FM WIRELESS 
MICROPHONE 
I Mod? by una of the leading J spantse manufacturers. T 
I factaryasse'mblBdFM w-frelea a microphone is peweret 
■ Two AA stia baltariaa It liansmitj in lha range pfBB-1 
I MHr Elamant i< bwiH in a pl**tJ€ tutio type case with 
m ilirectipnai elecironic eondanaor mierophona u 
I By ulirtg a BUndard FM radio, signal can be heard a 
I wharaon B ona-OCro lot- Sound quality was judged ''v 
I good " MODEL WEM-3G. n ^., , 



6- WAY A/C ADAPTOR 
Input 110VAC Cuipui JV A BV. 6V. J5V o 12VPC 




HYBRID AUDIO POWEfl AMPL^FIER IC's 
From 7 WATTS to 10G WATTS 

I Typical i niirtpf : Operating coia- tamp. 85' C. T, H .D =4.6£6f 
=20Hz-S0KH;. Input resistance Pd" 0. 1 W30KJ1. Power 
I band width £OHz-2DKHz. frefl. rasrwnsO 1 0- 1 DOK Hi. Oul- 
I put raitsianea =dfl ifVith buiH-m prcftectlon circuit. All 
I uniii coma with data =ha*-i 



OUR tOW PRICE 

$5 &D gpcli 



PROFESSIONAL REGULATED 
VARIBLE DC POWER SUPPLY KIT 

A1I iplid state circuitry with high alficicncy power tranais- 
tor 2SD3oB and ID voltage regulator MC1T33. Output 
voltage tan be adiuatad Irum Q-30V at 1A currant limited 
pr 0-1 SV al ZA current limited. Ir.tcinal reaiatance il lata 
than 00511 r ripple and noiaa la>a than ImV. dual on 
panel materi for voltage and amp reading, also vmb on 
board LEO and audiblaoverlaad indicator. Kit epmes with 
pEe-dnlled! PC Board, initruello-iiS, all fiacttt&ff plac- 
Ironic componanli, tranalormar and a professional look- 
ing metal cabinal The best project f pr schuol and the mpsl 
useful instrument lot repairman Build on* today 1 



flj i 



\W RACK MOUNT CABINETS 

IbcL anodlnd front panrl with black toxtuiod cos? 

WIDTH DEPTH HEIGHT PRICE 

XT IllfV S - S2SSO 

17 11rt" 5" S31.50 

17"" 11Vi H T- &39.GQ 



SUPER FM WIRELESS MIC KIT — MARK III 

Thl» navr deiignad clrcuM u«s hkgh FHEG FET Iraitslstpn 

with 2 stag* pre.amp, Tran-irniH FM rsnoa (U-130MHZ] up 

la S blpcks BMMy and with the ullrm sensitive condenver 

mlcrophofH that comet with Iha kit, allem ypu to pick up 

any sound wlttun IS H aw«y. KH Includn all el*clronlc parti. 

OSC coils and PC Board. Power supply 9VDC- 

FHC-105 

S11,60P*rWl 




FLUORESCENT AUDIO LEVEL MONITOR 

This is the kindnlVU monitor that is being used by most 
ampbiuar manufacturers. IC's are used to simpliry Circuit 
layout. Easy to as-sern'jlo and can be UBBd With All pcWer 
taval amplifitr*. Power raquiramafil 12V0C. 



TE-221 KIT 
For Ju^t S2S SO 
tf 5i«k] 




ELECTRONEC SWITCH KIT 
CONDEhSER TYPE. Touch On- Touch Qffl- i.i-.r-. 7473 IC 
and 12V relay S5 SO 



POWER SUPPLY KIT 
O-30VOC HEOULATEO Ute* UA723 and 2 N 301. 5 powet 

■b-anaiator. Output can be adjusted from 0-30 V L> 2ft. Com- 
pleie with PC Board and all elecironic parts. 

TRANSFORMER SS.SOeo. 
POWER SUPPLY kit ST0.50 ma. 



FLUORESCENT LIGHT DRIVER KIT 
1 2V C Powered . .. Light* up S ■ 1 5 Wan F lupresceot Light 
Tubes Ideal for camper, outdoes auto or boat Kit includos 
high voltage ooi! r power transistor. fn«t aink. all other etec- 
tronlc parts and PC Board Light tube not included, 
$6.50 Pur Kit 



ELECTRONEC DUAL SPEAKER PHOTECTOH 
Cute off whan circuit is aborted or over loadad to protact 
your amplifier as well as your spor>Vefi. A must few QCL 





■■■I 
■■■I 



■■■I 



■■■! 



Part No. 


Output 


Vcc 


Unit Pnea 


5TK040 


low-*- 10W 


±16V 


S1A.50 


STK041 


1SW-H5W 


±20V 


STB.50 


STKOSO 


BOW 


±3SV 


SZ5.50 


5TK054 


23W 


±19V 


S1 3.50 


STK05S 


30W 


±22V 


S1S.50 


STK070 


70W 


±42V 


S32,50 


STK41& 


7W+7W 


30V 


S 8.50 


STK43-9 


15W+15W 


39V 


$18.50 


STK«S 


30W4-3OW 


±28V 


$25.50 


3TK01OS 


1D0W 


±50V 


S36-50 



OUTSIDE CALIFORNIA 

PHONE ORDERS ONLY 



1-800-672-8758 



CALL TOLL FREE 



SANYO ANTENNA SIGNAL BOOSTER 

I This Booster is specialty designed lOr UHF Channels {14- 
I S3] After installing (between the antenna input cable and 
1 the UHF tunai], this unit will provide a minimum ol 10dB 
1. |hs| is apprpximatnly 2 times bettor than you are see- 
now. Ideal for thoio who '. ■■- ■> in apartmama that oan net 
I put up BO outdoor antenna Small. ns..:o. nr>\;-2 > 1 '/'.'. 1 
I Su pply voltaoe- is IS VDC . Back In Stock. 




WHISTLE ACTIVATED SWITCH BOARD 
I AJEbpards are pro-assembled and tested Your wmislle 10 its 
I FET condensor microphone from a distence r ai l.v aa 3D 
I iret away (senatlrvfty can ha easily adjusted], will turn the 
I iwrtth on and kf you whistle again it will turn oh. Ideal lur 
I remote control loys, electrical appliance such as lights, cof- 
I fee pots, TV. Hi-Fi, ladro or other projaota. Unit worka on 
| &VDC. 

MODEL 963 54.50 o». 

[ FOR COMMERCIAL FREE TV BOX BUILDERS 



lMCt3!>aS3.<H>ea. 

I MC1350 S2.2FJ ta 
I MC1330 S3O0-aa 
MC1.!%J;!!,fl".i 
IlMIIoB STOOea- 
I LMIBSa S3 75 » 
InE505 S2 19ea 
I N£564 53.4S » 



LM3B0 

LMTSIo 

LM791S 

10K IDT PC Mount 

lOlt IT PC Mount 
TorroJd Colli {sat of 4^ 
5'35pF (Trimmer Capf 



y :- s ".i ea. 
I.SOea. 
1.20 ea. 
3.00 as. 
1.75 ea 

3.00BB. 

.35 aa.. 



Power X- former IfiVC- 8ft 3 SO ea. 



SOLAR CELLS 

I O.SV 200MA. Ideal for all kmds p1 nhir projects, cells can 
I tr* put in sories to double voltage at parallel to double 
S1 .30 u*. 




ACOODBUY 

at ses.oo 



120W PURE DC POWER STEREO AMP KIT 

Getting power hungry from your small amp? Have to watch 
your budget? Here's a good solutionl The TA*800 is a pure 
DC amplifier -with a built in pre- amp, Alt coupling capaci- 
tors ore eliminated 10 give you a true reproduction at the 
music. On board tone and volume controls combined with 
buMt in power supply mako tbt TA'SOO the most compact 
sterap amp available. Specifications; ODW t 2 into DLL 
Ffeo.. t ange: 0Hz -TOOKHi ±3dB . T H D .0 r '. u ■ hotter . S/H 
ratio: 80d&. Sanaittvkty: 3tnV Into 47K. Powor Require' 
mont: ±24-40 Void. 




* SPECIAL* 

EXCELLENT PRICE! 

MODEL 001 0034 

$29.50 Pur KH 

Transformer 
S10.G0 Oa 



V 



TA-323 60 WATTS TOTAL 
30W + 3OW STEREO AMP KIT 

This is a solid state all transistor circuitry with on board 
stereo pra-amp for most mlcrophonu » phone input. Power 
output employs 2 pairs matchmg Darlington Transistors 
driven by the popular 2N3053 driver Transistors. Four built 
on board controls lor, volume, balance, treble and bass. 
Power supply requires -13VC1 2 'if- transformer. THD of 
lass than 0.1% betwaen tOOHi-IQKhr at full power (30 
Watts +■ 30 Watts loaded into 8ft|. 



1 WATT AUDIO AMP 

AH parts are pra-assamfalad on a mini PC Board. Supply 
Voftaga S-9VOC SPECIAL PHICE $1.95 



6W AUDIO AMPKIT 

TSAfllOwlth Volume Control Power Supply B- 1 HVOC 



AUDIO FREQUENCY SPECTRUM 
ANALYSER KIT TA-2900 

This Audio Frequency Spectrum Analyser analyses audio 
signals in 10 octave* over s dynamic range ol 30dB. The 
technique allows the sound coloration introduced by 
unwanted loom and speaker resonances to ba substan- 
tially eliminated. 

The Tft-2900 provides a visual presentation pf the Cheng* 
mg spectrum thru 100 rod LED displays, so you can act- 
ually sea proof of the enualixed aound you've achieved. 
The TA T 2900 kit comes with all the electronic compo* 
iienta, IC's, prodrillad PC board, the instructions and a 19" 
Rack Mount type motel cabinet with professional nlk- 
scraen printed front panel, 

e Input Son a il ivi ty Tape MOnitor/IQmV - IBmV B0K '-'■ 
Speaker T t .„, i, a i'0 2V.' ■ 1 DOW an 

a Display Level Range (all octaves) 2dB per step/— 1 4dB 
to -4dB. 

a Daisy Time [1 KHz) Fait.- 1 \ 3d B ;s 5low/6dB/s 

a Ppwor Input 1 1 7 W or 220V AC 50/60 He. 

e Power Consumption .'iCiW 

482.1 W| x lOZ^Hf x 2B0fD) mm. 
i:-:J!'i !.-.£.■ per kit 





Minimum Order SlOOO/Calif. Residents add 
6.S% Sains Tax. Phono Orders Act&pied on 
VISA or MC ONLY, NO C.O.O/s. Pric« Si.L- 
JBCt to Chang* Without Notice 



Inside C alif prnia 

Outside Calil. (Irtcl Maaico H Canada) 



TA-IOOO KtT 

$51.95 

Power Tranafermer 

S24.00 ea. 



100W CLASS A POWER AMP KIT 
Dynemie B3es Claia "A" circuit design makes this unit 
unique in il* das*. Crystal clear, 1&0 watts power output 
Wdl satisfy the most picky fans A perfect combinetion 
wrth Iha TA- 1 D2B low Tl M sterap pre. amp, 
Spocilicstions: * Output power 100W RM$ ante BS2. 
12BWRMSmtp40: a Frequency response 10Hi> 100 KHe 
» THD leas than D.O0BK a S.'N ratio banar than EC-dB 
• Input sansrtrvlty IV mi*. • Power auppry ±40V ■& EA 



SHIPPING AND HANDLING CHARGES 

Under S&O.OO Puicbaaa Over $TjQ 00 Purchase 

10% 9K 

15% 10% 



LOW TIM DC STEREO PflE-AlYlF KIT TA-T-020 

Incorporate* brand- now DC design that gives a frequency 
response from 0-IOOKhf ±0.5dB Added features like 
tone deleit and loudness control let you tailor your own 
frequency supplies to eliminate power fluctuation! 
Specilicalions; •THD/TiMleis!han.D0fi% * Fiaquency 
response DC to iooKHz±0.5dB • RIAA deviation ±0.2dB 
oS/N ratio batter than 70dB a Sensitivity Phono 2mV 
47KJAu* ICOmVIOOK * Output leva! 1.3V *Maxnufpui 
15V* Tone controls Bass tl OdB 9 EOHi/Trebl e ±1 OdB 
<? ISHj: a Power supply ±24VDC£«0,5A Kit comes with 
regulated power supply, all you need is a 4BVCT transfor- 
mer • 0.5A, Only $44.60 
X'former 



$4.B0 ea. 




'FISHER" 30 WATT STEREO AMP 

WALK AMP (15W a 2). KM Includes 2 pea. Flthsr PA 301 
Kybnd IC, all electronic parta with PC Board. Power supply 
±1«VDC (not Inctuoed), Pomr band with KF i' + +3dB| 
l33dB. 2rjHl-2gKH£. 



Only S18.H 



ULTRASONIC SWITCH KIT 

Kir includes the Ultra Sonic Transducers. 2 PC Boards lor 

transmitter and receiver, a1| electronic pans end instruc- 
tions. Easy to build and a lot of uses such as remote control 
for TV. garage door, alarm system or counter. Unit operates 
bySriaVDC 

$15.60 «. 








Never worry about battery, because It has none! Easy tp 



•level wvrry buuue uaiLwy. uecauBe n nas none: easy \n 
carry in pocket and handy to uso. Ideal for emergency light 
It ganef Irtae rts OWit elvCtndlh/ by aquaezing grip levar. Put 
one m your car, boat, camper cr home. You may need it 
some timal EXCLUSIVE $3.95 ea. 



STORE HOURS 
MOW. - FRI. 10-7 
SAT 10-6 



■■■I ■■■■■■■■■ 



16K DYNAMIC 2S0NS 



8/ s 11 9 f ET 2114 



ALL MERCHANDISE 100% GUARANTEED! 



1KX4 STATIC J 

LOW POWER 200NS< 



CALL US FOR VOLUME QUOTES 



[ STATIC RAMS 




21 0t 


256 I 4 (450ns) 


1.95 I 


5101 


256 I 4 <450ns) Icrao-.] 


3.95 1 


2101-1 


1024 I 1 (450ns) 


.89 1 


2102L-4 


1024x1 (450ns) (LP) 


1.29 1 


2102L-2 


1024 x 1 (250ns) (LP) 


1.69 1 


2111 


256 x 4 (450ns) 


2.99 1 


1 2112 


256 * 4 (450m) 


2.99 1 


2114 


1024 x 4 (450ns) 


8/14.95 I 


I 2114L-4 


1024x4 (450m> (LP) 


8/15.25 I 


2114L-3 


1024x4 (300n«( (LP) 


8/15.45 I 


I 211.IL-! 


1024 , 4 (200ni) (LP) 


9/15.95 I 


I 2147 


4096 x 1 (SSns) 


9.95 I 


I TMS4044-4 


4096 I 1 (450ns) 


3.49 I 


I TMS4044-3 


4096 I 1 (3 J li iv. , 


3.99 I 


I TMS4044-2 


4096 i 1 (200ns) 


4.49 I 


I MK411B 


1024 x 8 (250ns) 


9.95 I 


1 TMM2016-200 


2048 x 8 (200m) 


5.95 I 


1 TMM2016-150 


2048 x S (150ns) 


6.95 I 


1 TMM2016-100 


2048'x 8 (100nt) 


7.95 I 


1 HM6116-4 


2045 x (200ns) (cmos) 


E.95 I 


1 HM6116-3 


204 6 i 8 (150ns) (cmos) 


7.10 1 


1 HM6116-2 


2048 x 8 (120ns) (cmos) 


9.9S I 


1 HM5116LP-4 


2046 i 6 (200ns) (cmos)(LP) 


0.75 1 


1 HM6116LP-3 


2049 x 5 (150ns) (cmos)(LP) 


8.95 | 


I HM6116LP-2 


2046 x B (120ns) (cmos)(LP) 


12.95 


1 Z-6132 


4096 X 8 (300ns) (Qslall 


34.95 


1 LP Low Power Qstat Quasi -Static 



DYNAMIC RAMS 




TMS4027 


4096 X 1 (250ns) 


2.50 


MK410S 


8192 x 1 (200ns) 


1.95 I 


MM5298 


8192x1 (250ns) 


1.85 


4116-300 


16394 x 1 (300ns) 


8/11.75 I 


4116-250 


16394x1 (250ns) 


8/11.95 


4116-200 


16384 X 1 (2011ns) 


8/13.95 I 


4116-150 


16384 XI (150ns) 


8/15.95 


4116-120 


16384x1 (120ns) 


8/29.95 1 


2118 


16384 i 1 (150ns) (5v) 


4.95 


MK4816 


2040 X 8 (300ns) (5v) 


24.95 1 


4164-200 


65536 I 1 (200ns) (5v) 


7.25 


4164-150 


65536 X 1 (150ns) (5») 
5V ~ single 5 volt supply 


8.25 





EPROMS 




1702 


256 X 8 


(1Ui) 


4.50 I 


2706 


1024 I 8 


(450ns) 


3.95 


2758 


1024 x 8 


(450ns) !-'•■.■ i 


9.95 I 


2716 


2046 x 8 


(450ns) (5v) 


3.95 I 


2716-1 


2048 x 8 


(350 ns) (5v) 


7.95 


TMS2716 


2048 I 8 


(450ns) 


9.95 


TMS2532 


4096 x 8 


(450ns) (5v) 


7.95 I 


2732 


4096 ■ 8 


(450ns) (Sv) 


6.95 


2732-250 


4096 i 8 


(2S0ns) (S») 


12.95 I 


2732-200 


4096 « 8 


(200ns) (5v) 


16.95 


2764 


8192x9 


(450ns) (Sv) 


16.95 


2764-250 


9192x8 


[250ns) (Sv) 


18.95 


2764-200 


9192 x 8 


(200ns) (Sv) 


19.95 I 


TMS2564 


8192x8 


(450ns) (5v) 


24.95 


MC68764 


8192 x 9 


(450ni) (5v)(24 pin) 


call I 




5v Single 5 Volt Supply 





[ EPROM ERASERS 






Capacity Intensity 




Timer 


Chip (uW/Cm') 


PE-14 




6 5,200 83.00 


PE-14T 


X 


6 5,200 119.00 


PE-24T 


X 


9 6,700 175.00 


PL-26ST 


X 


20 6,700 255.00 


I PR-125T 


X 


16 15,000 349.00 


LpR-320 


X 


32 15,000 595.00 



DISC 




CONTROLLERS 


1771 


20.95 


1791 


29.95 


1793 


38.95 


1795 


54. S 5 


1797 


54.95 


6843 


34.95 


8272 


39.95 


UPD765 


39.95 


1691 


18.95 


2143 


•ts.zr 


INTERFACE 


9T26 


1.89 


BT2S 


2.49 


8T95 


.99 


8T9S 


.99 


8T97 


.99 


8T98 


.99 


DM9131 


2.95 


DP8304 


2.29 


OSS635 


1.99 


DS8836 


.99 


MISC. 




3242 


7,95 


3341 


4.95 


MC347D 


4.95 


MC3400 


9.00 


11C90 


13.95 


95H90 


7.95 


2513-001 UP 


9.95 


2513-002 LOW 


9.95 


SOUND CHIPS 


76477 


3.95 


76489 


8 95 


AY3-8910 


12.95 


MC3340 


1.49 


CRT 




CONTROLLERS 


6845 


14.95 


68S45 


35.95 


H 046505 SP 


15.95 


6847 


12.25 


69047 


24.95 


8275 


29.95 


7220 


99.95 


CRT5027 


39.95 


CRT5037 


49.95 


TMS9918A 


39.95 


BIT-RATE 


GENERATORS 


MCI 4411 


11.95 


SH1941 


11.95 


4702 


12.95 


COM501G 


16.95 


COM6116 


10.9S 


MM5307 


10.95 


UARTS 


AY3-1014 


6.95 


AV5-1013 


3.95 


PT1472 


9.95 


TR1602 


3.95 


2350 


9.95 


2651 


18.95 


TMS6011 


5.95 


IM6402 


7.95 


IM6403 


8.95 


IN58250 


14.95 


KEYBOARD 


CHIPS 




AY 5 -2376 


11.95 


AY 5-3600 


11.95 


74C922 


5.25 


74C923 


5.50 



CLOCK 
CIRCUITS 



MM5314 


4.95 


MM 5 369 


3.95 


MM5375 


4.95 


MM58167 


3.95 


MM58174 


11.95 


MSM5832 


6.95 



Z-80 




2.5 Mhz 


;ao cpu 


3.95 


Z80-CTC 


6,95 


Z8Q-DART 


15.25 


Z80-DMA 


17.50 


I Z80-PIO 


5.75 


Z80-SIO/0 


18.50 


I Z80-SIO/1 


18.50 


Z80-SIO/2 


18.50 


1 Z80-SIO/9 


16.95 


4.0 Mhz 


[ ZB0A-CPU 


6.00 


Z80A-CTC 


8.65 


Z80A-DART 


16.75 


Z80A-DMA 


27.50 


ZaOA-PIO 


6.00 


Z80A-SIO/0 


22,50 


1 ZS0A-S1O/1 


22.50 


Z80A-SIO/2 


22.50 


I ZSOA-SIO/9 


19.95 


6.0 Mhz 


I ZBOB-CPU 


17.95 


Z80B-CTC 


15.50 


ZB0B-PIO 


15.50 


ZILOG 


Z6132 


34.95 


L Z8671 


39.95 



r CRYSTALS^ 


32.768 khl 


1.95 


I 1.0 mhz 


4.95 


1.8432 


4.95 


2.0 


3.95 


2.097152 


3.95 


2.4576 


3.95 


3.2768 


3.95 


3.57953S 


3.95 


4.0 


3.95 


5.0 


3.95 


5.0688 


3.95 


5.185 


3.95 


5.7143 


3.95 


6.0 


3.95 


6.144 


3.95 


6.5535 


3.95 


9.0 


3.95 


10.0 


3.95 


14.31816 


3.95 


15.0 


3.95 


16.0 


3.95 


18.0 


3.95 


18.432 


3.95 


20.0 


3.95 


22.11S4 


3.95 


132.0 


3.95 



DATA 




ACQUISITION | 


ADCQS00 


15.55 1 


AOC0804 


4.95 1 


ADC0S09 


5.25 1 


ADC0S17 


10 95 1 


DA CO 800 


4.95 1 


DACQ9D6 


2.25 1 


DACoeoe 


4.95 


OAC1020 


8.25 


□ AC1022 


8.25 


MCI 408 L6 


2.25 


MC1409LS 


4.95 I 



8000 




8035 


7.2S I 


8039 


7.95 I 


INS-8060 


17.95 


INS-8073 


29.95 I 


8080 


3.95 


8095 


7.95 I 


80B5A-2 


11.95 I 


8096 


29.95 I 


8037 


CALL 


8086 


39.95 


8089 


89.95 


8155 


7.95 


8156 


8.95 


8185 


29 95 I 


8185-2 


39.95 I 


8741 


39.95 


B74B 


29.95 


9755 


32.00j 



8200 




9202 


29.95 


8203 


39.95 I 


8205 


3.50 


9212 


1.85 


8214 


3.85 


8216 


1.80 I 


8224 


2.50 


9226 


1.80 I 


8228 


4.90 


8237 


19.95 1 


8238 


4.95 1 


8243 


4.45 1 


8250 


14.95 


8251 


4.75 | 


8253 


9.25 I 


8253-5 


9.85 I 


8255 


4.75 I 


8255-5 


5.25 


8257 


8.50 I 


8257-5 


8.95 I 


8259 


6.90 


8259-5 


7.50 1 


8271 


39.95 


8272 


39.95 1 


8275 


29.95 


8279 


9.50 1 


8279-5 


10 00 


8282 


6.65 


8283 


6.65 I 


8284 


5.70 I 


8286 


5.65 I 


8287 


6.50 I 


6288 


25 .00 


8289 


49.95J 



FUNCTION 
GENERATORS 



MC4024 
LM566 
XR2206 
L 8038 



3.95 
1.49 
3.75 
3.95 J 



[" INTERSIL 


ICL7103 


9.50 


I ICL7106 


9.95 


ICL7107 


12.95 


ICLS033 


3.95 


ICM7107A 


5.59 


I ICM7208 


15.95 



JDR MICRODEVICES, INC. 

1224 S. Bascom Avenue 

San Jose. CA 95128 

800-538-5000 • 800-662-6279 (CA) 

(408) 995-5430 • Telex 171-110 



VISIT OUR 
RETAIL STORE 



f 6800 


68000 


99.95 I 


6800 


4.95 I 


6802 


10.95 


6806 


13.90 1 


6809E 


19.95 I 


6809 


12.95 I 


6810 


2.95 I 


6820 


4.95 I 


6821 


4.95 I 


6828 


14.35 I 


6840 


12.95 I 


6843 


34.95 I 


6844 


25.95 I 


6845 


14.95 1 


6847 


12.25 I 


6850 


3.45 I 


6852 


5.75 I 


6860 


10.95 I 


6362 


11 95 I 


6875 


6.95 I 


6380 


2.95 I 


6883 


24.95 I 


63047 


24.95 I 


63488 


19.95 I 


6800 


1MKZ 


68 BOO 


10.95 1 


68602 


22.25 1 


68B09E 


29.95 1 


69809 


29.95 1 


68B10 


' 7.95 1 


68821 


12.95 1 


68B45 


35.95 1 


68BS0 


12.95 1 


68 BOO 


2 MHZ 





6500 






1 MHZ 




1 6502 




5.95 


6504 




6.95 


1 6505 




8.95 


6507 




9.95 


1 6520 




4.35 


1 6522 




8.75 


1 8532 




11.25 


1 6545 




22.50 


1 6551 


2 MHZ 


11.85 


6502A 




9.95 


I 6522A 




t1.70 


6532A 




12.40 


I 6545A 




28.50 


6551A 


3 MHZ 


12.95 


I 6S02B 




14.95 



EXAR 



XH 2206 


3.75 


XR2207 


3.85 


XR220B 


390 


XR2211 


5.25 


XR2240 


3.25 



9000 SERIES 



9316 
9334 
936 B 
9401 
9601 
9602 
96S02 



1.00 
2.50 
3.95 
9.95 
.75 
1.50 
1.95 



HOURS 
M~F 9-5, Sat 11-3 



PLEASE USE YOUR CUSTOMER NUMBER WHEN ORDERING 

TERMS Fq* shipping i nel udeS2 lor UPS Ground or S3 tor UP&Qtue 
Label Air Hems over 5 pounds require additional shipping charges 
Foreign trd^rv include sullident amount lor shipping There is a S10 
minimum order Bay Area and Lot Angel** Counties add 6 , Sales 
Tat Other California resident add &' Sales Tai. We r— ,,, v , ,_t u . 
right to Substitute manufacturer Not responsive for typographical 
errors. Prices are suh|ect to change *i I ho lil notice We wil match or 
beal any competitor* price provided ii is not below our cost 



CIRCLE 61 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



2716 



16K EPROMS 



2732 



32K EPROMS 



ALL MERCHANDISE 100% GUARANTEED! 



CALL US FOR VOLUME QUOTES 



74LS00 



7400 



CMOS 



74LSO0 


.2S 


74LS86 


.40 


74LS169 


1.75 


74LS323 


2.75 ■ 


it; su<jKt 


IS» 


74LS01 


.25 


74LS90 


.65 


74LS170 


1.T5 


74LS324 


1.75 ■ 


1-99 


100 


T4LS02 


.25 


74LS91 


.89 


74LS173 


.80 


74LS352 


1.55 1 


8 pin ST .13 


.11 


74LS03 


.25 


74LS92 


,70 


74LS174 


.95 


74LS353 


t.55 ■ 


14 pin ST .15 
16 pin ST .17 
18 pin ST .20 
20 pin ST .29 
22 pin ST .30 
24 pin ST .30 


.12 
.13 
.18 
.27 


74LS04 


.25 


74LS93 


,65 


74LS175 


.95 


74LS363 


1.35 ■ 


74 L SOS 


.25 


74LS95 


,55 


74LS1B1 


2.15 


74LS364 


1.95 ■ 


74LS08 


.35 


74LS96 


,95 


74LS189 


9.95 


74LS36S 


.95 ■ 


.27 


74LS09 


.35 


74LS107 


.40 


74LS190 


1.00 


74LS366 


.95 ■ 


.27 


74LS10 


.25 


74LS109 


.40 


74LS191 


1.00 


74LS367 


.70 ■ 


2B pin ST .40 


.32 


74LS11 


.35 


74LS112 


.45 


74LS192 


.85 


74LS368 


.70 ■ 


40 pin ST .49 


.39 


74LS12 


.35 


74LS113 


.45 


74LS193 


.95 


74LS373 


1.75 ■ 


ST SOLDERTAIL 


74LS13 


.45 


74LS114 


SO 


74LS194 


1.00 


74LS374 


1.75 ■ 


8 pin WW .59 


.49 


74LS14 


1.0G 


74LS122 


.45 


74LS195 


.95 


74LS377 


1.45 ■ 


14 pin WW ,69 


.52 


74LS15 


.35 


74LS123 


.95 


74LS196 


.85 


74LS378 


1 13 ■ 


16 pin WW .69 


.58 


74LS20 


.25 


74LS124 


2.99 


74LS197 


B5 


74LS379 


1.35 ■ 


18 pin WW .99 


.90 


74LS21 


.35 


74LS125 


.95 


74LS221 


1.20 


74LS385 


1.90 ■ 


20 pin WW 1.09 
22 pin WW 1.39 
24 pin WW 1.49 
26 pin WW 1.69 
40 pin WW 1.99 
WW WJREWR 


.98 
1.28 

1.35 
1.49 


74LS22 


.25 


74LS126 


.85 


74LS240 


1.29 


74LS386 


.65 I 


74LS26 


.35 


74LS132 


.75 


74LS241 


1.29 


74LS390 


1.90 H 


74LS27 


.35 


74LS133 


.89 


74LS242 


1,85 


74LS393 


1.90 ■ 


1,80 


74LS28 


.35 


74LS136 


.55 


74LS243 


1.85 


74LS39S 


1 65 ■ 


AP 


74LS30 


.25 


74LS137 


.99 


74LS244 


1.29 


74LS399 


1.70 ■ 


16 pin ZIF 6.75 


call 


74LS32 


.35 


74LS13B 


.75 


74LS245 


1.90 


74LS424 


2, 95 ■ 


24 pin ZIF 9.95 


call 


74LS33 


.55 


74LS139 


.75 


74LS247 


.75 


74LS447 


.37 ■ 


ZIF TEXTOOL 


74LS37 
74LS38 
74LS40 


.55 
.35 
.35 


74LS145 
74LS147 
74LS14B 


1.20 
2.49 
1.35 


74LS248 
74LS249 
74LS251 


1.25 
.99 
1.30 


74LS490 
74LS624 
74LS66B 


1.9S ■ 
3.99 ■ 

1.69 ■ 


(Zero Insertion Force) 






74LS42 


.55 


74LS151 


.75 


74LS253 


.85 


74LS669 


1.69 ■ 


r CONNECTOR! 


T4LS47 


.75 


74L5153 


.75 


74LS257 


.85 


74LS670 


2.20 ■ 


RS232 MALE 


3.25 


74LS4B 


.75 


74LS154 


2.35 


74LS258 


.85 


74LSS74 


9.55 1 


RS232 FEMALE 


3.75 


74LS49 


.75 


74LS155 


1.15 


74LS259 


2.85 


74LS6B2 


3.20 I 


RS232 FEMALE 




74LS51 


.25 


74LS156 


.95 


74LS260 


.85 


74LS683 


3 20 ■ 


RIGHT ANGLE 


5.25 


74LSS4 


.35 


74LS157 


.75 


74LS266 


.55 


74LS684 


3.20 ■ 


RS232 HOOD 


1.25 


74LS55 


.35 


74LS158 


.75 


74LS273 


1.65 


74LS8S5 


3.20 ■ 


S-10O ST 


3,95 


74LS63 


1.25 

.40 


74LS160 
74LS161 


.90 
.95 


T4LS275 
74LS279 


3.35 
.55 


74LS688 
74LS689 


2.40 ■ 

3.20 ■ 


Ls-ioo ww 


4.95 


74LS73 






74LS74 


.15 


74LS162 


.95 


74LS280 


1.98 


74LS783 


24.95 ■ 






74LS75 


.50 


T4LS163 


.95 


74LS2S3 


1.00 


81LS95 


1.69 ■ 


rDIP SWITCHE: 


74LS76 


.40 


74LS164 


.95 


74LS290 


1.25 


S1LS95 


1.69 ■ 


4 POSITION 


.85 


74LS78 


.50 


74LS165 


.95 


74LS293 


1.B5 


81LS97 


1.69 ■ 


5 POSITION 


.90 


74LS83 


.75 


74LS166 


2.40 


74LS295 


1.05 


B1LS98 


1.69 ■ 


6 POSITION 


.90 


74LS85 


1.15 


74LS168 


1.75 


74LS298 


1.20 


25LS2521 
25LS2569 


2 80 ■ 

4.25 ■ 


7 POSITION 
I 8 POSITION 


.95 
.95 





Prices Slashed! 






74S00 






74S00 


.32 


74S163 


1.95 




74S02 


.35 


74S168 


3.95 




74S03 


.35 


74S169 


3.95 




74S04 


.35 


74S174 


1.09 




74 SOS 


.35 


74S17S 


1.09 




74S08 


,35 


74S181 


3.95 




74S09 


.40 


74S182 


2.95 




74S10 


,35 


74S188 


1.95 




74S11 


.35 


74S189 


6.95 




74S1S 


,35 


74S194 


1.49 




74S20 


.35 


74 SI 95 


1.49 




74S22 


,35 


74S196 


1.49 




74S30 


.35 


74 S 197 


1.49 




74S32 


.40 


74S201 


6.95 




74S37 


.88 


74S225 


7.95 




74S38 


.85 


74S240 


2.20 




74S40 


.35 


74S241 


2.20 




74SS1 


,35 


74S244 


2.20 




74S64 


.40 


74S251 


.95 




74S65 


.40 


74S253 


.95 




74S74 


.50 


74S257 


.95 




74S8S 


1.99 


74S258 


.95 




74S86 


.SO 


74S260 


.79 




74S112 


.50 


74S274 


19.95 




74S113 


.50 


74S27S 


19.9S 




74S114 


.55 


74S280 


2.25 




74S124 


2. 75 


74S287 


1.90 




74S132 


1.24 


74S288 


1.90 




74 S 133 


.45 


74S289 


6.89 




74S134 


.50 


74S301 


E.95 




74S13S 


.89 


74S373 


2.45 




74S138 


.95 


74S374 


2.45 




74S139 


.95 


74S381 


7.95 




74S140 


,55 


74S387 


1.95 




74S151 


.95 


74S412 


2.98 




74S153 


.95 


74S471 


5.45 




74S157 


.95 


74S472 


5.45 




74S1S8 


.95 


74S474 


7.95 




74S161 


1.95 


74S4S2 


15.25 




74S162 


1.95 


74S570 
74S571 


4.25 
4.25 




ORDER TOLL FREE 

800-538-5000 
800-662-6279 

(CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS) 

IF YOU CAN FIND A PRICE LOWER- 
ELSEWHERE. LET US KNOW AND 
WE LL MEET OR BEAT THEIR PRICE 1 
iSEE TERMS BELOWi 

* Computer managed inventory — 
virtually no back orders! 

* Very competitive prices! 

* Friendly staff! 

* Fast service — most orders 
shipped within 24 hours! 



LED DISPLAYS 



HP 5082-7760 
MAN 72 
MAN 74 
FND-3S7 (359) 
FND-500 (503) 
. FND-507 (510) 



£" CC 1.29 

X CA .99 

.3" CC .99 

.375" CC .75 

,5" CC .99 

.5" CA .99 , 



LED LAMPS 1 

1-99 100-up 



Jumbo 

Red .10 

Jumbo 

Green ,18 
Jumbo 

Yellow ,18 .15 



.09 

.15 











4000 


.35 


4528 


1.25 


7400 


.19 


74132 


.45 1 


4001 


.35 


4531 


.95 


7401 


.19 


74136 


.50 1 


4002 


.25 


4532 


1.95 


7402 


.19 


74141 


.65 ■ 


4006 


.95 


4538 


1.95 


7403 


.19 


74142 


2.95 ■ 


4007 


.29 


4539 


1.95 


7404 


.19 


74143 


2.95 ■ 


4008 


.95 


4543 


2.70 


7405 


.25 


74145 


.60 ■ 


4009 


.45 


4555 


.95 


7406 


.29 


74147 


1.75 ■ 


401 


.45 


4556 


.95 


7407 


.29 


74148 


1.20 ■ 


4011 


.35 


4581 


1.95 


7408 


.24 


74150 


1.35 1 


4012 


.25 


4582 


1.95 


7409 


.19 


74151 


.65 I 


4013 


.45 


4584 


.95 


7410 


.19 


74152 


.65 B 


4014 


.95 


4585 


.95 


7.111 


.25 


74153 


.55 I 


4015 


.95 


4702 


12.95 


7412 


.30 


74154 


1.40 1 


4016 


.45 


74 COO 


.35 


7413 


.35 


74155 


.75 I 


4017 


1.15 


74C02 


.35 


7414 


.55 


74156 


.65 1 


4018 


.95 


74C04 


.35 


7416 


.25 


74157 


.55 I 


4019 


.45 


74C08 


.35 


7417 


.25 


74159 


1.65 ■ 


4020 


95 


74C10 


.35 


7420 


.19 


74160 


.85 I 


4021 


.95 


74C14 


1.50 


7421 


.35 


74161 


.70 ■ 


4022 


1.15 


74C20 


.35 


7422 


.29 


74162 


.65 ■ 


4023 


.35 


74C30 


.35 


7423 


.29 


74163 


.85 ■ 


4024 


.75 


74C32 


.50 


7425 


.29 


74164 


.65 1 


4025 


.35 


74C42 


1.75 


7426 


.29 


74165 


.85 1 


4026 


1.65 


74C48 


1,20 


7427 


.29 


74166 


1.00 1 


4027 


.65 


74C73 


.65 


7428 


45 


74167 


2.95 I 


4028 


.80 


74C74 


.85 


7430 


.19 


74170 


1.65 ■ 


4029 


.95 


74C76 


.88 


7432 


.29 


74172 


5.95 ■ 


4030 


.45 


74C63 


1.95 


7433 


.45 


74173 


.75 HH 


4034 


2,95 


74C85 


1.95 


7437 


.29 


74174 


.89 1 


4035 


.85 


74C66 


.95 


7436 


.29 


74175 


.89 1 


4040 


.95 


74C89 


4.50 


7440 


.19 


74176 


.89 1 


4041 


1.25 


74C90 


1.75 


7442 


.49 


74177 


.75 1 


4042 


.75 


74C93 


1.75 


7443 


.65 


74178 


1.15 1 


4043 


.85 


74C95 


1,75 


7444 


.69 


74179 


1.75 1 


4044 


.85 


74C107 


1.00 


7445 


.69 


74160 


.75 1 


4046 


.95 


74C150 


5.75 


7446 


.59 


74181 


2. 25 1 


4047 


.95 


74C151 


2.25 


7447 


.69 


74162 


.75 1 


4049 


.55 


74C154 


3.25 


7448 


.69 


74 184 


2.00 1 


4050 


.55 


74C1S7 


1.75 


7450 


.19 


74165 


2.00 1 


4051 


.95 


74C160 


2.00 


7451 


.23 


74186 


18.50 1 


4053 


.95 


74C161 


2.00 


7453 


.23 


74190 


1.15 1 


4060 


1.45 


74C162 


2.00 


7454 


.23 


74191 


1.15 1 


4066 


.75 


74C163 


2.00 


7460 


.23 


74192 


.79 1 


4066 


.40 


74C184 


2.00 


7470 


.35 


74193 


.79 I 


4069 


.35 


74C165 


200 


7472 


.29 


74194 


.85 1 


4O70 


.35 


74C173 


200 


7473 


.34 


74195 


.85 1 


4071 


.30 


74C174 


2.25 


7474 


.35 


74196 


.79 1 


4072 


M 


74C175 


2.25 


7475 


.49 


74197 


.75 1 


4073 


.30 


74C192 


2.25 


7476 


.35 


74199 


1.35 1 


4075 


.30 


74C193 


2.25 


7460 


.59 


74199 


1.35 1 


4076 


.95 


74C195 


2.25 


7481 


1.10 


74221 


1.35 1 


4078 


.30 


74C200 


5.75 


7482 


.95 


74246 


1.35 1 


4061 


.30 


74C221 


2.25 


7463 


.50 


74247 


1.25 1 


4062 


,30 


74C373 


2.75 


7465 


.65 


74248 


1.85 1 


40B5 


.95 


74C374 


2,75 


7486 


.35 


74249 


1.95 1 


4036 


95 


74C901 


.80 


7489 


4.95 


742S1 


.75 1 


4093 


.95 


74C902 


.85 


7490 


.35 


74259 


2.25 1 


4098 


2,49 


74C903 


.85 


7491 


-40 


74265 


135 ■ 


4099 


1.95 


74C905 


10.95 


7492 


.50 


74273 


1.95 1 


14409 


12.95 


74C906 


.95 


7493 


.49 


74276 


1.25 1 


14410 


12.95 


74C907 


1.00 


7494 


.65 


74279 


,75 1 


14411 


11.95 


74C908 


2.00 


7495 


.55 


74283 


2.00 1 


14412 


12.95 


74C909 


2.75 


7496 


.70 


74284 


3.75 1 


14419 


4.95 


74C910 


9.95 


7497 


2.7S 


74285 


3.75 1 


I 4502 


.95 


74C911 


10.00 


74100 


1.75 


74290 


.95 1 


4503 


.65 


T4C912 


10.00 


74107 


.30 


74293 


.75 1 


4508 


1.95 


74C914 


1.95 


74109 


,45 


74298 


.85 1 


4510 


.95 


74C915 


2.00 


74110 


.45 


74351 


2.25 1 


4511 


.95 


74C91B 


2.75 


74111 


.55 


74365 


.65 1 


4512 


.95 


74C920 


1795 


74116 


1.55 


74366 


.65 1 


4514 


1.25 


74C921 


15.95 


74120 


1,20 


7436T 


.65 1 


4515 


2.25 


74C922 


5.59 


74121 


.29 


74368 


.65 1 


4516 


1.55 


74C923 


5.95 


74122 


.45 


74376 


2.20 1 


4518 


1.25 


74C925 


6.75 


74123 


.55 


74390 


1.75 1 


| 4519 


155 


74C926 


7.95 


74125 


.45 


74393 


1.35 1 


4520 


1.25 


74 0927 


7.95 


74126 


.45 


74425 


3.15 1 


4522 


1.2S 


74C926 


7.95 


74128 


.55 


74426 


85 1 


4526 


1.25 


74C929 


19.95 






74490 


2.55 B 


L 4527 


1.95 


74C930 


19.95 



TRANSISTORS DIODES 



PN2222 
PN2907 
2N2222 
2N2907 
2 N 3055 
3055T 
2N3904 
2N3906 

IN4148(tN914) 
. IN4Q04 



NPN SWITCH 
PNP SWITCH 
NPN SWITCH 
PNP SWITCH 
NPN POWER 
NPN POWER 
NPN SWITCH 
NPN SWITCH 
SWITCHING 
RECTIFIER 



TO -92 
TO -92 
TO-18 
TO-18 
TO-3 
TO-220 
TO-92 
TO -9 2 



10/1.00 

10(1.25 

.25 

.25 

-79 

.69 

10/1.00 

10/1.00 

25/1.00 

10/1.00 



100/8.99 

100/10.99 

50/10.99 

50/10.99 

10/6.99 

1 0/5.99 

100/6,99 

100/9.99 

1000/35.00 

1 00/8.99 j 



CIRCLE 61 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



FLOPPY DISK DRIVE 









LINEAR 










RCA 




LM301 


.34 


LM350K 


5.60 


NE570 


4.75 


LM1E00 


2.99 


CA 3010 


.99 


CA 308 1 


1.65 


LM301H 


.79 


LM350T 


4.60 


NE571 


3.95 


LM1812 


6.25 


CA3013 


2.00 


CA 30B2 


1.65 


LM3Q7 


.45 


LM35C 


.93 


NE592 


2.75 


LM1815 


5.20 


CA 3023 


2.75 


CA 3083 


1.55 


LM30S 

LM308H 


36 
1.15 


LM359 

LM376 


1.79 
3.75 


LM703 
LM709 


.S9 
.59 


LM1818 
LM1820 


2.90 
3.50 


CA 3035 
CA 3039 
CA 3046 


2.49 
1.29 
1.25 


CA 3088 
CA 3089 
CA 3098 


.80 
2,99 
3,49 


LM305H 


1.95 


LM377 


2.29 


LM710 


.75 


LM1830 


3.50 


CA 3053 


1.45 


CA 3130 


1,30 


LM303K 


1.49 


LM378 


2.50 


LH711 


79 


LM1871 


5.49 


CA 3053 


2.90 


CA3140 


1.15 


LM310 


1.75 


LM379 


4.50 


LM723 


.49 


LM1872 


5.49 


CA 3060 


2.90 


CA3146 


1.85 


LM311 


.64 


LM360 


1.29 


LM723H 


.55 


LM1B77 


3.25 


CA 3065 


1.75 


CA3160 


1.19 


LM311H 


.89 


LM360N-6 1.10 


LM733 


.9B 


LM1899 


2.49 


CA 3030 


1.10 


CA3401 


.59 


LM312H 


1.75 


'■.!■.• i 


1.60 


LM741N-S 


.35 


LM1B96 


1.75 






CA 3600 


3.45 


LM317K 


3.95 


LIU 392 


1.60 


LM741N-K 


.35 


LM2877 


2.05 










LM317T 


1.95 


LM383 


1.95 


LM741H 


.40 


LM2870 


2.25 




^r 






LML11S 


1.49 


LM384 


1.95 


LM747 


.79 


LM2900 


.95 




Ti 




LM313H 


1.59 


LM386 


1.50 


LM748 


.59 


LM2901 


1.00 


TL494 


4.20 


75385 


1.95 


LM319H 


US 


LM3S7 


1.40 


Lf.1l.J1.-. 


2.75 


LM3900 


.59 


TL496 


1.65 


75450 


.59 


LM319 


1.25 


LM369 


1.35 


LM1303 


1.95 


LM3905 


1.25 


TL497 


3.25 


75451 


.39 


LM32rj(see 


790C) 


LM390 


1.95 


LM1304 


1.19 


I.M39Q9 


.99 


75107 


1,49 


75452 


.39 


LM322 


1.65 


LM392 


.69 


LM1305 


1.49 


LM3911 


2.25 


75110 


1.95 


75453 


.39 


LM323K 


4.95 


LM394H 


4.60 


LM1307 


.85 


LM3914 


3.95 


75150 


1,95 


75454 


.39 


LM324 


.59 


LM399H 


5.00 


LM1310 


2.90 


LM3915 


3.95 


751 54 


1.95 


75491 


.79 


LM32S 


.69 


NE531 


3.75 


MC1330 


1.89 


LM3916 


3.95 


7518S 


1,25 


7549? 


.79 


LM331 


3.95 


NE536 


6.00 


MCI 349 


1.S9 


MC4024 


3.95 


75189 


1,25 


75493 


,89 


LM334 


1.30 


NE555 


.39 


MC1350 


1.29 


MC4044 


4,50 






75494 


,89 


LM335 


1.40 


NE556 


.69 


MC135B 


1.79 


HC4136 


1.25 










LM336 


1.75 


NE55S 


1.50 


LM1414 


1.59 


BC4151 


3,95 




pi C 


:ct 




LM337K 


3.95 


NEi.fi; 


19.95 


LM145S 


.69 


LM4250 


1.7S 




Dl rti 




1 LM337T 


2.95 


NE562 


6.00 


LM14SB 


.99 


LM4500 


3.25 


TL071 


.79 


TL084 


2.19 


LM338K 


6.95 


NES0-: 


3.95 


LM14B9 


.99 


LM 13080 


1.29 


TL072 


1.19 


LF347 


2.19 


LM339 


.89 


LM565 


.99 


Ll.11-li.if. 


.S5 


LM 13600 


1.49 


TL074 


2.19 


LF351 


.60 


LM3J0(sc£ 


7600) 


LM566 


1.49 


LM155BK 


3.10 


LM 1 3700 


1.49 


TL081 


.79 


LF353 


1.00 


LM3J3 


1.20 


LM567 


1.29 










TL082 
TL083 


1.19 
1.19 


LF355 
LF356 


1.10 

1,10 




H " TO 


SCAN 


T 


TO-220 


K 


TO-3 








LF357 


1.40 





VOLTAGE 




RE 3ULAT 




7805T 


.89 


7905T 


.99 


7806T 


.89 


7908T 


.99 


781 2T 


.89 


7912T 


.99 


761 5T 


.89 


791 ST 


.99 


7824T 


.89 


7924T 


.99 


7805K 


1.39 


790SK 


1.49 


7812K 


1.39 


7912K 


1,49 


781SK 


1.39 


791SK 


1.49 


7824 K 


1.39 


7924 K 


1,49 


78L0S 


.69 


79L05 


.79 


7SL12 


.59 


79L12 


.79 


78L1S 


.69 


79L15 


.79 


78H05K 


9.95 


LM323K 


4,95 


78H12K 


9.95 


UA7SS40 


1.95 




T - TO-220 


K TO-3 






L 


TO-92 





STOP BY AND 

VISIT OUR 
RETAIL STORE 

HOURS: 
MON.-FRI. 9-5, SAT. 11-3 



RESISTORS 

V. WATT 5% CARBON FILM ALL 

STANDARD VALUES 

FROM 1 OHM TO 10 MEG OHM 

SO PCS. SAME VALUE .025 

100 PCS. SAME VALUE .02 

,1000 PCS- SAME VALUE .015 , 



WE NOW STOCK A 

COMPLETE STOCK OF 

DISC, ELECTROLYTIC, 

MONOLITHIC AND 

TANTALUM CAPACITORS 



JDR SUPER SPECIALS" 

MEMORY CLEARANCE 

DYNAMIC 

64k X 1 4164-200NS 



;95 



STATIC 

2k X 8 TMM2016-200NS $5"" EA 

1 k X 1 2102L-450NS 1 00/ S 75 



CPU SALE 

8 BIT 

Z - 80 CPU 2MHZ *3 95 (ta 3.75 £A> 

6502 1 MHZ S 5 95 {lOr 5.75 ijA r 

6809 INT. CLOCK *12 95 (in' 11. .25 6* J 



16 BIT 



8086 

1 68000 ■■..'.!.■ 



S29' 5 

59995 



4k X 1 4027-2S0NS 



$725 
S-J 95 



BAUD-RATE 
GENERATORS 

MC14411 7.S5 

1.8432 CRYSTAL 4.95 

4702 >.9S 

2.4576 CRYSTAL 4.95 



TRANSISTORS 

PN2222 10GO. r 69.0G 

2N3904 1000/89.00 

2N3906 1O0O,'69.0O 



IC SOCKETS 
LOW PROFILE 
SOLDERTAIL 

HIGH RELIABILITY 
DUAL SIDE WIPE STYLE 



■IP" 

2, pifl 
,D gin 



SALE ENDS SEPTEMBER 30, 1982 



MICROCOMPUTER 
HARDWARE HANDBOOK 

FROM ELCOMP —$14.95 
Over 800 pages of manufacturers data sheets 
on most commonly used IC's 
Includes; 
*TTL-74/74LSand74F 

* CMOS 

* Voltage Regulators 

* Memory — RAM, ROM, EPROM 

* CPU's — 6800. 6500, Z80, 8080. 8085. 8086/8 

* MPU support & interface — 6800, 6500. Z80. 
8200, etc. 



DISKETTES 

5 1 /*" 

ATH AN A ss so soft 24.95 

MEMOREXsssdsoft . 26.95 

VERBATIM ss so soft 29.95 

VERBATIM io section hard. . 29.95 

8" 

VERBATIM sssd soft 44.95, 



JDR MICRODEVICES, INC. 

1224 S. Bascom Avenue 

San Jose, CA 95128 

800-538-5000 • 800-662-6279 (CA) 

(408) 995-5430 • Telex 171-110 



VISIT OUR 
RETAIL STORE 



HOURS 
M-F. 9-5; Sat 11-3 



PLEASE USE YOUR CUSTOMER NUMBER WHEN ORDERING 

TERMS' For flipping include 5 2 lor UPS Ground or S3 lor UPS Blue 
Label Air. Items over S pounds require additional shipping charge. 
Fore Ig n o rders. i nc lude suf tia e nf amo un I tor shi pptng. There i s a & 1 Q 
minimum order Bay Area and Los Angeles Counties add 6V Sales 
Tax. Other California residents add 6 ; , Sales Tex. We reserve Ihe 
rlghl to substitute manufacturer Not responsible tor typographical 
errors. Pnc es are su b|ec 1 1 o c ha ng e without n otic e We will mate h or 
beat any competitor's price provided II is not below our cost. 



CIRCLE 61 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



FOR YOUR APPLE* $ 299 95 



APPLE* II COMPUTER USERS 
DISK DRIVE $ 299 95 

Includes metal cabinet 
Color matches Apple 




• 

* 35 Tracks/single side 
I* Includes cable 
I* Use with Apple II Controller 

16K RAM CARD *69 95 

Upgrade your 48K Apple II to full 64K of RAM. 

Fully software and hardware compatible with the Apple 

language card and microsoft Z80 card. 

Eliminates the need for the Applesoft or Integer Basic 

ROM card when used in conjunction with DOS 3.3. 

Allows you to run Apple Fortran or Pascal with no 

difficulty. 

Available as bare board, kit, or assembled and tested 

board. 

BARE PC CARD — $28.00 KIT — $59.95 

COOLING FAN *69 95 

* Easy installation. 

* No modification of Apple required. 

* Color matches Apple. 

* Switch on front controls fan, 
computer and monitor. 

* Ultra-quiet, reliable fan. 
|* Completely eliminates problems 

caused by overheating. 

'Apple is a trademark of APPLE COMPUTER. INC. 




BOOKS — BEST SELLERS 

OSBORNE/MCGRAW-HILL SYBEX 

Appte II Users Guide 14,95 Your First Computer , ; . * ...»*■ . 8.95 

CRT Controllers Handbook ....... 6,99 The CP/M handbook . 14.95 

68GG0 Assembly Language The PASCAL Handbook .,„,,.. 18.95 

Programming 16,99 Microprocessor Interfacing 

■ CBASIC User Guide 15.00 Techniques , ... . 17.95, 



POWER SUPPLIES 



MODEL 1 s 29 95 

OPEN FRAME STYLE 

MANUFACTURED 

BY SIGMA 

+5 VOLT 4 AMP 



MODEL 2 *39 95 

MOUNTED ON PC BOARD 
MANUFACTURED BY CONVER 
+5 VOLT 4 AMP 
±12 VOLT 1 AMP 



EPSON 
PRINTERS 

MX-80 

MX-80FT 

MX-100 

CALL FOR PRICE 

WE HAVE APPLE AND TRS-80 
IN TERFACE CARDS AND CABLE S 

MONITORS 



NEC JB-1201 M 

ZENITH zvM-121 



s 169 oo 

$■11995 





FOR SHIPPING PLEASE 1NCLUDES4.00 FOR UPS GROUND:$13 00 FOR UPS BLUE LA8EL, 



ORDER TOLL FREE 

800-538-5000 
800-662-6279 

(CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS) 

IF YOU CAN FIND A PRICE LOWER 

ELSEWHERE. LET US KNOW AND 

WELL MEET OR BEAT THEIR PRICE' 
fSEE TERMS BELOW) 

* Computer managed inventory — 
virtually no back orders! 

* Very competitive prices! 

* Friendly staff! 

+ Fast service — most orders 
shipped within 24 hours! 



5 1 /i" DISK DRIVES 

TAN DON 

TM100-1 (POR IBM PC) 229.00 

SHUGART 
SA400L 199.95 

CABINET FOR &k"- 
DISK DRIVE 

• COLOR MATCHES APPLE 

* FITS SHUGART 

SPECIAL — $ 29 95 



4116 16K DYNAMIC RAMS 2 5o ns 8/ $ 1 1s 9 et 



CIRCLE 61 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



CD 
O 

z 
o 
rr 

h- 
o 

LU 



o 
a 
< 

EC 



SPARTAN 



Kk-clninirs Int. 



(516)499-9500 

6094 Jericho Tpke. 
Commack, N.Y. 11725 



Remote T.V. Converter 

139.95 Ea. 
4 & up 125.00 
60 Channel 
Wireless Control 




E3 commodore Color- 

( =VIC*2LW, Sound- 

u Graphics 

ZJ $259. 



Cassette Player $69.00 



Logic Probe 
Global Specialties #LP-2 

$28.49 

DTUTTL/CMOS 




DELUXE 40 CHANNEL 
VHF to UHF Block 
Converter $38.95 ea. 

Features accessible fine tuning knob 
included: matching X former and two cables 



Surge Stopper Brooks 

4 Outlet w/circuit bkr. 

led/sw $59.79 
1 Outlet $43.50 

Now you can have M aximurn Protection / 

lor your sensitive electronic equipment. 




Refurbished 

Monitors 12" diagonal 

39.95 



a 



Atari 800 w/i6K ram $659 

A 



ATARI. 



Atari 400 w/isk $289 




42 Channel CATV 
Converter 



w/on/off Fine Tuning 
$94.95 



«3*\ 



4 Chann el VHF to UHF 
«^..T^L [Block Converter 



28.95 Ea. 
24.95 4 & Up 



Volume 
Discounts 

Uin Order 110 00 
Inlemiliona ■'.*: 

Pries subject to cnarnje 
wirhoul notice 
COD? 00 Eflra 



• Vsa. MC BAG. Amei Check 


COD. Money OrOo 




• Add For Snipping 




(o 7500 


$250 


reooto kooc 


S450 


JSIBOto 50000 


1600 


5010010 7M00 


«5C 


75100 to looooo 


S1?0Q 


9w 1000 00 


SI2M 



(516) 

499-9500 



MonTh 
9-8 



Tu WF 
9-6 




ELECTRONICS CO., INC. 

SEND OR CALL for your 

FREE 

1982 Catalog 

A 48 page handbook with 
48 SUPER exciting, low cost, 

electronic projects. 
(Some projects as low as $2.50). 

CALL Toil-Free 
1-800453-1708 

Utah residents 1-801-628-3627 




NEW 

These PPG Electronic Kits are 
available at your 
local electronic store. 
Kltf 

Ml MC« M DICC 

ao; signal injector 

903 BRACE WAN «UH 
804 ■ETUI note ton 

so 5 uii ic probe 

KM 1URGLAR ALARM 
90S DECISION MAKER 

309 u» penouluw metronome 

811 ODUILE DECISION MAKER 
81 1 I WE PI OtCllLATDD 
31-1 ROBOT BUNKER 
= lii Hmi-WINtt 
eiSfllNOUlEM 

8.>0 shimmer uihts 
mi Christmas the 
822 we channel color ohm 

824 All 10 MIT |[ II KEN 
8?£ FBK MI 

1:8 b-volt power stippLr 

930 0-19 HOLT rOWER SUPPtl 

834 COLOR aUAN 3-CKAHRil. 1-COHTRUl 

938 1-CNANNEL, 4 CONTROL COLOR OMAN 

938 1I-10LT POWER SO FPU 

940 VARIABLE STR0IE LI GMT 

842 IZ-V0LT COLOR DREAM 

844 VL JAMMER 

ws 12- volt turn STROBE FLASHER 

850 WN0OPIR ALARM 

852 C0MOLHATIQH LOCRVALANM CONTROL 

850 EUCTHCNIC TEH HI I 

15 B DIBIT At ROULETTE 

86 5-10 VOLT REBULATEO POWER IltPPIT 

8£i bis Bating portable omak 

862 FULL-WAVE MOTOR SPEED CONTROL 

866 DIGITAL SLOT NACHINS 

988 OLBITAl DICE 

870 HOVE TESTER ^Ti^tC 

976 6' DIBIT OtBITAL CLOCR 

978 DIBITAL BIBB 

990 1*>«RLT. 2AHP REBULATEO POWER SUP PIT 

982 MUSICAL HORN 

984 SOUND ACTIVATED COLOR 0RBAH. I. CHANNEL 

996 AUDIO A HP/ INTERCOM 

988 LIBRARIAN TORMENTOR 

690 STOP- ACTION TIMING TESTER 

992 TELEPHONE NOLO 1UTTOH 

89« PHAION GUN, SOUND GENERATOR 

10! BIN ART CLOCK 




Also available, complete 
Basic Electronics Course 



jBuild Some 

TODAY! 

PPG Electronics Co., Inc. 

791 Red Rock Road, 

St. George. Utah. 84770 



Special Prices For Educators 




Free Buyers Guide 

84 pages of the latest in components, tools 
and instruments — a must for DESIGNERS, 
instructors and maintenance engineers. 

NEW ZENITH ZXM 121 

High legibility 1 2" green phosphor monitor. 

1 5 Mhz bandwidth, 

40 or 80 character . 

selectabte lull comparability.. $ 1 1 /.OO 

OVERSTOCK SPECIALS 

(*%* -<SI 

r/3ss/i ■ 

c/f- Ji ■ 3" ftoton Fan „.. . 

i&^jij ^w $10.95 

VU Meters 99* Ea. 

470K '/< W Resistor $2.00/ 1 OOP 

£» 24 VAC 5O0 MA 

Plug in transformer $4.50 

diz^%\ UHF/VHF Conversion 

KiA^ f t Genuine Mitsumi 

^^^!/ Tuner ,.$11 9.96 

CALL OUR HOT LINES 

IN CALIF. (714)327-2554 

OUTSIDE CAL. (800) 854-8660 

SCR ELECTRONICS CENTER 

5303 Lincoln Ave.. Cypress. CA 9O630 

CIRCLE 93 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 





m 



, lnjhu d your chramt [up id 




12DVAC VARIABLE STROBE LIGHT KIT 

Compltlt ramblr rati lErpfee i.rahl kil pjoduenn briHunE fluhti of jggtiL 

Fgr pujr(m r dinCJPI, rli-nliY. cliKQI. tie. 

Opt ti'.ti Tram itindard I ?U Vfi.C 
drtgt|n-."hL>utjndl at ihttt li" 
lhroU(<h Oul ihl wOrlct Contains Kf - 1 
itraitjht xtnan 1i«h(ubl, Ov frill Vlt si 
contftlittd bond 3" f L x 2"W. 

C3071 
3 CHANNEL COLOH ORGAN KIT 

VlfV potXIlAr 3 £hintir.1 coJnr organ ctuv 
30Q «i M s e*r crh jnn^l J Eo flllli IQ th* but 
oi rmmic. Hu 3 dglforint filial tE*garj lor 
tow, frt*dgum jnd hipjh nolm. Futurtf 
Intl CHtirDl and 3 npJii>Tt> AC DuIIbxi T4 
connccf ChrgitPTin iNffrttl, Ivnpt. IK. 
Op«nMl fr&n 13QVAC. S;* al tWard: 

y x s". 

C4&30 S»J50 
[TELEPHONE AMPUFCER KJT 

IWfJW tNag-yotH CVH !-ri\ IPm e: dnvirnat, ejo wfttl 

unelilurr kil, Pralunti h.jh ejiwi flficnjn<t tnfUiltOT tad \C implglglf 

circuit whidg. prc«vidM eF4>r loud 

output IQ i small ipiiker. Usw 

IpOCIlr '.e -:.:,/£ jgiducliadi csil md 

noiu rcdktcCirjn. (ilui lur njuk per- 

lormincr Sift Ol r.rru- Iw-irtS 

only 3*" x 1 ft", OpiE-iTH hom BV 

diiiitt [not iiDdutltd). 

C473T SS.9S 

IS NOTE TUNABLE ELECTRONIC ORGAN KIT 

' Tun j hi* H not? Orpin 1r*turii IC DKillilor *nd djrliflgttan mm 
Hilar ouTput iiicjt to prwid* loud elur lonin, Pipy jutipl* compoiM Eioni, 
HiD-is* iL-n«. cic LJicl i el j hi* cOmlinKllOn ouitibutton twrtchn fer 
continuout troutrit lr» pfrrorm- 
4ftC*. E«n nDi* it f-jliw IvnaEjIf im|h 
on Ixurd tnminbir cfimrolt Sim of 
braird 2" X 5". Op* rift Mi from 3V 
to 9VDC Itjitury «wi T*:iud*d r . 
C47J6 B.K 



Ofeb 




1 82 circle 84 on free information card 



CIRCLE 80 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




CIRCLE 91 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



vy\ADWVNCED 
T Z>-COA\P0TER 
^A/PRCHXJCTS 



\ 



MICROPROCESSORS 



1 6K Apple™ Ramcard 

LIST 195 
ACP 

*69 95 

• Full 1 year warranty 
Top quality — gold fingers 
• Expand Apple II 48K to 64K 
Compatible with Z-80 Softcard' 
• Allows system to run with CP/M". PASCAL 
DOS 3.3, C ORAL, Visicalc. etc. 
Supplied with extra 16K RAM S has (2) LED's 




32 K STATIC RAM 

2*r4MNi 
EipwtaHl 

Ullt 

in4i'i 

16K4MttrK.I SIS9 !>S 

16K4MHIAat 317*5 

32K * MHJ Kil •' MHS T»«. 
* J32K hi MHz AAT • 33& DC 

BAfl£ BOARD Wttt 

Barc&dw.'aiiaj-i'firssiiem 99 95 




BARE BOARDS 



s- '..■>:: Sound n...^? 

80BOAC-PLI 

32K Static HAM (21 14} 
0K EPflOW [27061 
2706/2716 EPROM 
acp pvote Board 
Vecloc 8800 Pf alo 
V«1c* 6603 1 1 Moil MS 
ACP EjitonOtf with COrtne'tlor' 
13 Skit Mather Bonn* 1WMC1 
9 S la1 Molher Bci'd i WMCl 
8 Slot M01h«r Bd (Expcndlbtat 
Floppy PCB <B SHUGART) 
SI OGl AY?>e3 1 Q i Sound Board 
Applt Sound Board 



134 96 
34 95 

34 as 

24 95 
3495 
22.95 

25 20 
29 96 
1895 
32.95 

2ft ft5 

34 95 

39 95 
34 96 
24 95 



"EPROM" 

ERASER 




Model S-52T 



MoWa * EPflCMs 
at a lire 
S32S.OO 



16K Memory 
Expansion Kits 

for Apple/TRS-80 

8pcs41VB1flK 

200/260nS &•-! f\ Qr 

Specily computw *P I •C.ijJ 

CALL FOR VOLUME PRICING 



"D" SUB CONNECTORS 



^ 



UrVBSl p/WB DS37 
maJD. DB25 ^e mai r> 
QqU PC mount wilEi 
mounting noios 
MFij AMP 
SoflC4fy25or37o«n5 



BD37$2,50 0675 $1 .95 



Astec RF Modulator 
— " for 

*-n^ r 3 COLOR 

B/W 



P/N 1062 Channel 3 



sess 



1200 BAUD MODEM IC 

^^^^k Features: 

^Pin" 1 *SVo..[iOnlv 

SL12QO S129.00 



64K CMOS RAM 

S100(200nS) 

Uses 2716s SQ/IQ30 
or6116's 0*+C7 

Ass emu lea & Tested 5399.00 



MOSTEK RA 4 „s 
^j(ff 290, 

'■■■IfTVl * 200.000 OieCoi in 

1 *f\ L L stock — pf iced to move 
t 1 SjMiifi4iMK4Q27ei<.e*il1 i™5 
lelratn MK40i54Kxi ram 



PMI "Super Beta' 

tLOW POWER 
AMPLIFIER 
INTERNALLY 
COMPENSATED 
P/NOP12GJ 
|ta1 Vorfeel ■* 1 .0 mV 

55 g5 Ibias = 5.0mA 

ACP Gain = 40WmV 

$1-fl5 ' (quantity limited) 



4K STATIC RAM 
4fr RFI L-OFF 

^j$: 10/S9.90 

l^WV' oui d«jiflnirt specifically 
1 B lOrZ-aOtnBediysIeflvm This 
IS 1 »uH-*p*C 4K*1 HAM. 4&0nS 
OrderP/N Zilpg 0T04-4, wrufe supply Luis 



Zilog 

28 CPU 
with 
TINY 
BASIC 
Debug prog 
Plus 6132 companion 
quasi-static RAM 29.95 



l 4? 

>rog. $49.95 



Stepper Motor 




USED IN 

DATA 

PRODUCTS 

PRINTER 

$19.95 08 . 



CONNECTORS 



EJB25P rR5232l 
DB25S Femai* 



Sat with Hood Salt 
22/44 S/T. KIM 

43/86 s/t **ot 

50/1 CO S-100 Connector W/W 
50/1 DO 3-1O0 Connate* S/T 



\12b 

3 75 
1 25 
7S0 

650 

4 95 
3 95 



PARALLEL ALPHA NUMERIC 
PRINTER 



^V 9ft 19 Column Printer pnnlS, 1 & n umflr-ca' columns plus 3 

^^^^■P^^ columns which Have math, alpha and Piter notaliGn*. 
^^^^ Each wheel has l? posilions with posilion 12 btank 

Position 1 1 on numerical columns havfi decimal poinl or * Utilizes 2 75" 
wide adding machine lapo and a dual color mh nbbpn. input data parallel 
wi.hfouiBHtBCDcomiparaTorcifcijiTiSchenimrcprnvicfed] Pnnlrale 3nnes 
per second Opetatrng voltage 22-2BVDC with typical cycle lime of 
340ms suubvwx 3vrHj( 5S dp New $17;S0ea. 3/S45 



£4001 SPUD? 


BOOH-1 


(H45. 


eflojp h» 


£6002 MM 


2901 


QW 


KJS u» 


ao 8» 


2»1A 


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BOS 1Z« 


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asncuL 


49 95 


9D73N 3* '06 


■F-8 (iMKOi 10 » 


GHt? 


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8TH 401H 


SffiO 1SH 


6ea?A 


10 05 


ar*3 409* 


W? grs 


rMfliQO 


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e«o 30.00 


«wda 4ta 


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11 ?5 


son *3» 


aoas 4B 


eriooB 


1 9 95 


aerjgo ij3bi 




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ai1fl/20tSS7 95 


B2C4-B4K 


a so 


41 ti@-£ 


199 


411&-2 BW12 95 


2101 


390 


2102 


79 


21L02-2 


149 


21U32-I 


129 


2111 


349 


21 >2 


3 49 


2114 


199 


2114L-2 


3 2S 


2114L * 


229 


?13$ 


699 



2147 SS.99 

411 5W 
414 4Q9 

hot sa 

1103 9fl 
4027 469 



4GS0 U3 

4096 399 

4115 149 

4200 7 9S 

440? 190 

52W 4»0 

IK 




S155S9 95 
BlSfl 995 
6202 2995 
6205 2 89 
B212 2 75 
9214 495 
8216 2 75 
8224 2 95 
B22fi 2 3£ 
8229 95 
B243 9 50 

8250 14 95 

8251 B-50 
825311 96 
8255 450 
&2S7 S50 



825& SS 95 
827519 35 
82TS 950 
8S10 4 75 
8820 950 
Q&S1 Q.50 
6628X0 50 
6634 19 95 
5645 22 95 
6S47 27 95 
6650 5 26 
5652 5 25 
5850 1095 
6S6210&5 
6875 5 95 
6880 2 49 



66047 $22 95 

68455 19.95 

45505 22 95 

6520 5.95 

6522 995 

9530-X 24 95 

S532 17.06 

6651 1995 

ZBfrPlO B50 

ZflOA-PIO S 50 

Z60-CTC 6 so 

Z60A-CTC 9 50 

ZS&DMA 1995 

Z80A'DMA 27.95 

Z60-SIG 24.95 

Z80A-51O 29.95 



MOS PROMS 



2764 |8Kx6l TS 
2732 L4KiS1 T5 
37'6/25SB,5V 
|2Krfr|T5 
TMS271C SV T2V 
275S SV i|45Cln5l 



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17,96 



2r-c5i440n3ri S5?i 
J706j65Qn5| 5?5 
1 702A 5 7S 

MM5203AO 14 &0 
MM52Q4Q 995 



EBESa 



7511-001 isyi 

JSIlOMtfmLDBif. IBM 

jiit'AQmevti.MF ><» 

UCHHF1D ASCII HJtm t; R 
MCUH^DUlirLVrttd 13*1 
HdU6fiTM*«tu:Corlrol 1 3*4 



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LOW PROFILE 
SOCKETS [TIN) 



BpiftLP IE 15 

14 ptn IP 20 19 

16 Pin LP 22 21 

16 pin IP 29 29 

20 pin IP 34 32 

22 pin LP 2Q 27 

24 pin LP 66 3? 

26 pin LP 45 44 

40 p<n LP 60 59 

3L IMREWRAP 
SOCKETS (GOLD) 



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lOpinWVUTinl 65 
14p<nWW 75 

15 p 



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22fxn 

24 pin 
26 pin 
40 |i n 



WW 95 

WW 1 15 

WW 1 45 

WW 1 35 

WW 1 60 

WW 220 



1 28 

1.53 
200 



99 

1 23 
1 14 
1 38 
1 66' 



76>C&K 
7BMD6 
7BM@ 

LM106AH 

LM3O0H 

LM301CW 

LM604H 

LM305H 

LM306H 

LM307CN 

LM305CN 

LM309K 

LM310CN 

LM311CI/CM 

LM3l2h 

LM3T7T 

LM318CN 

lAOlflH'H 

UWI320K-XX* 

LM320T-XX- 

IlM320H0<X' 

LM323K 

LM324N 

LM337K 

UM338K 

LM369M 

Uyl340K-JfX- 

LM34QT-XX T 

LM340I+XK* 

LM344H 

LM34&N 

LM350K 

LM356CS 

LM360M 

LM372M 

L,M3?6N 

LM377N 

LM380CN/N 

LM361N 

LM633T 

LM386N 

LM387N 

LM390H 

ISC531V/T 

ME556N 

NE561T 

HE585N/H 

H£5e6KW 

«567V/H 

HE592N 

LM7Q2H 

LM709N/H 

LM710N/N 

LM711N/H 

LM715N 

LM723M/H 

LM733N/H 

LM739N 

LM741CN/H 

LM741CN-14 

LM747N/H 

LM746f^H 

LMTeOCN 

LM131QN 

MC1330 

MCI 350 

MG13SS 



74S00S 39 

?4S02' 43 
74603 
74S04 
74S05 
74SOS 
74S09 
?4S10 

74S11 42 

74S15 42 

74320 42 

74S22 42 

74S30 42 

74S32 4ft 

74S36 1 19 

74S40 « 

74S51 42 

74&B4 45 

74355 46 

74S74 69 

74S86 72 

745112 72 

745113 72 
7+SH4 72 



t49 

1 49 

295 

99 

36 

1 96 

1 89 

3 25 

29 



1 25 

eft 

1 75 
1 70 
14ft 
125 
1 35 
139 
125 
4 95 

595 

6 95 
65 
1 75 
125 
125 
k 95 
120 
560 



156 
3 75 
2 75 
125 

1 79 
195 
t.25 
140 

1 95 
3.75 

39 
96 
1995 
125 
175 
150 

2 75 
l 99 



39 

1 95 



295 
190 
1 95 



LM1414N 

LM1456CW/r( 

MC146SN 

MCi4&Hh 

LM1495N 

LM1556N 

LM1820N 

LM1850N 

LM1889N 

LM2111M 

1M2901H 

LM2917N 

CA6013T 

CA30J8T 

CA3021T 

CA3023T 

CA3036iT 

CA3039T 

CA3046N 

L«3053H 

CA30S9N 

CA3O50^ 

CA3062N 

LM '!•::-■.-■! 4 

CA3080T 

CA3081M 

,..'■ ■■ ■:■•; 

CA3QS3N 

CA3DL* ■. 

CA306W 

CA30B9N 

CAaQ9?N 

CA3I30T 

CA3140T 

CA3145N 

CA3160T 

CASlOON 

CA3410N 

MC3423N 

MC3460N 

SC3524M 

CA3000N 

LM39O0N 

LM6905N 

LM3903N 

LM3914N 

LM3915N 

LM3916N 

RC413JN 

RC413QM 

RC4151H 

RC4194TK 

RC4195TK 

ULN200I 

ULN20GQ 

5N75'f50N 

SH75451N 

SM75452N 

SN75453H 

SM75454N 

5M76491N 

SN75492N 

5M7S493N 

5N75494M 

'TL484CN 

TL495CP 



99 
6ft 

1 SO 
95 
95 

3 10 

1 75 
99 

250 
2ft5 

2 19 
1S9 

3 49 
299 
2 75 
129 
12ft 
149 
319 
319 

4 95 



80 
29ft 
3 49 

1 9ft 
1 30 

1 1ft 
249 

l 19 



1 49 

3ft5 



375 
395 

3 75 
2 95 
1 10 
3.70 
495 
5.40 
125 
1 50 
59 



420 
166 



v: 



74S124 
74S133 
74S134 
74S!35 
74S136 
743138 
743139 
74S140 
74S15T 
74S153 
74S157 
74S158 
74S160 
743174 
74S175 
743166 
74S1B4 
74S195 
,*4SlftS 
743240 
74S241 
74S242 
743243 



01 

369 



I 29 

129 
7i 

1 2fl 

i a 

■ sa 

' 29 
2.7H 
149 
149 

2 SB 
i SB 

I Efir 

i n 
s re 



74S244 S2 99 

74S251 1 35 

74S253 1 35 

74S2S7 1.29 

743259 12ft 

743260 75 
74S260 2 79 
743267 299 
743288 2 55 
743373 3 10 
74S374 3 10 
743367 2 75 
743471 795 
74S472 795 

743473 7 95 

743474 ftft5 
74S475 995 

743570 5 75 

743571 5 75 

745572 S95 

745573 695 
743940 2 90 
745841 290 



DIP 

SWITCHES 



SPPSilron 5 99 

4 Position 1 19 

■5 PQsrlBn. 1 29 

ePOSilton 1.35 




7 Positron Si 39 

£ Position 1 49 

9 POSilon 1 65 

lOPoiilion 1 69 



MUFFIN® FAN 




The dependable, low 
cost, largest selling fan 
for commercial cooling 
applications 

• lD5cfmta»tf detnnsry 

• 4 66 «g n t 50 owe 
Weigjnt- 17fti 

SPECIAL PURCHASE 



** $9,50 



a. 



SUPER IC CLOSEOUT SPECIALS 



U.N2O03 2ft1 99 

MJ_a«a 

74LS377 
74LS241 
8269 

6581 RAM 
LM733CN 



2/1 99 

2/199 

695 

2ftS 

3/1 99 



2MQ121 3/$1 00 

5IG2662 395 

743287 1 95 

2758 EPROM 2 95 

74173/flTlO 5/1 99 

Z60ACPLI 4 95 

6522 896 



MC1414 3/199 6502 CPU 



595 



SOMA CPU 
2102 RAM 

4060 RAM 

8X300 CPU 

743397 

27D6 EPROM 6^9 95 

74LS93 3/1 DO 



295 

76 

1 49 

1495 
1 96 



2114 



a'i-s5o 



5027 CRT 


59 95 


11C24 


695 


95H03 


269 


MM5320 


599 


9131 RAM 


199 


■ V'.:. :■; 


199 


1103 RAM 


3/150 


5700 A/D 


2/1895 



TOLL FREE 

800-854-8230 

TV 

910-595-1565 



7400S 19 

7401 22 

7402 22 

7403 22 

7404 22 

7405 23 

7406 35 

7407 35 
7409 26 
7409 23 
7410 



7411 
7412 
7413 
7414 
7416 
7417 
7420 
7421 
7422 
7423 
7425 
7426 
7427 
7429 
7430 
7432 
7437 
7438 
7439 
7440 
7441 
7442 
7443 
7444 
7445 
7446 
7447 
7448 
7450 
7451 
7453 
74&4 
7459 
7460 
7470 
7472 
7473 
7474 



29 
29 



33 



74L30Q* 26 

74L501 28 

74LS02 28 

74LS03 29 

74L5Q4 35 

74LS06 28 

74L306 29 

74L30B 35 

74LS10 28 

74LS11 39 

741312 33 

74LS13 47 

74LS14 95 

74LS15 33 

741320 26 

74LS21 33 

744.322 33 

74LS29 33 

74LS27 33 
74LS26 
74LS30 

74LS32 33 

74L333 55 

74LS37 45 

74LS35 39 

74L340 26 

74LS42 79 

74LS47 79 

r4L34fi H 

74LS&1 26 

74LS54 29 

74LS&5 29 

74L373 45 

74LS74 42 

74LS75 59 

74L376 46 

74LS78 45 

74LSB3A 79 

74L565 1 ift 

744L366 45 

74LS90 57 

741.592 75 

T4L393 75 

74LS95 88 

74LS96 96 

74LS107 45 

74JLSl0ft 45 

74LS112 43 



4000 5 35 

4001 35 

4002 35 

4006 105 

4007 25 
4006 139 

4009 45 

4010 45 

4011 35 

4012 25 

4013 45 

4014 1 39 

4015 1 15 

4016 59 

4017 1 19 

4018 SS 

4019 45 

4020 1 10 

4021 1 19 
4022 
4023 
4024 
4025 
4027 
4029 
4029 
4030 
4031 326 



29 



95 



4032 2i5 
4034 3 25 
4035 



7476 * 38 
7476 



450 

49 
95 



38 

l 76 



747ft 
7480 
7492 
7483 
7485 
7486 
7469 

7400 39 

7401 67 

7492 45 

7493 45 
74ft4 69 
7495 65 

7406 69 

7407 2 90 
74100 2 90 
74107 32 
74109 37 
M' 14j I 35 
74121 29 
74122 
74123 
74126 
74128 
74126 
74132 
74136 
74139 
74141 

74142 2 95 

74143 2.95 

74144 2 95 

74145 62 
74147 1 95 

74146 1 20 

74150 1 09 

74151 67 

74152 67 
74163 67 
74154 1 19 
74156 76 

74156 76 

74157 69' 

74158 1 65 

74159 2 49 

74160 68 



39 



96 
7ft 



74LS113S 
74LS114 
74LS122 
741S123 1 
74JL5124 1 
74LS12S 
74L3126 
74LS132 
74LS136 
74LS133 
74JLS139 
74LS145 1 
74LS149 I 
74LS1S1 
7413153 
74LS154 1 
744L5155 I 
7413156 
74LS1S7 
74LS159 
74L5160 1 
74LS161 1 
74LS162 I 
74LS163 1 
74L5164 1 
74J.S165 
74LS166 2 
74LS168 I 
74LS160 1 
74L5170 S 
74LS173 
74UJ174 
74LS175 
74LS181 2 
74J,Sl90 1 
74LS181 1 
74L3192 
74L5193 
74LS194 1 
74LS195 
74LS196 
74LS197 
74L3221 1 
74LS240 1 
74L3242 1 
74L3243 1 
74LS244 1 



^i.- 



176 
7S 



741 61 S 
74192 
74163 
741 B4 

74165 

74166 t 20 

74107 

74170 k8ft 

74172 4 75 

74173 

7*174 

74175 

74176 

74177 

7417ft 

74190 

741 B I 

741B2 

74164 2 26 

74185 2 25 

74155 9 95 

74168 3 90 

74190 

74191 

74192 

74193 

74194 

74195 

74195 

74197 

74198 

74199 

74221 

74251 

74273 

74276 

74279 

74283 

74264 3 90 

74265 3 90 
74290 i 25 
74298 
74365. 
74366 
74367 
7436S 
74390 r 46 
74393 190 
74490 190 



1 :ri 



Bfl 



4041 1 25 

4042 95 

4043 85 

4044 65 
4040 1 75 

4047 125 

4048 99 

4049 45 
4050 
4051 



1 10 

4052 1 10 

4053 1 10 
4066 395 
4056 2 95 
4050 926 
4060 139 
4066 75 
4059 35 

4070 49 

4071 35 
4072 
4073 
4075 

4076 1 29 

4077 35 
4079 35 
4091 35 
4082 35 
4065 195 



74LS245S22Q 

74CS247 1 10 

74LS248 1 10 

74LS249 1 19 

74LS251 1.40 

74LS263 1*0 
74LS257 
74LS25B 

74LS250 2ftS 
74LS260 

74LS261 2.49 

74LS266 59 
T4LS273 

74LS275 440 
74LSZ79 

7413263 ftft 
74L5290 

74LS293 ftft 

74LS266 1 10 

74LS29B 1 19 

74LS324 1 75 

74LS347 1.&5 

74LS34B 195 

7413352 1 Ift 

74L3363 1 19 

74LS363 1.49 

74LS365 69 
74L3366 
74LS367 
74LS368 

74t,S373 16ft 

74L3374 1 3ft 
74LS37S 

.^L-£:j, r ; 1 3i 

744^385 195 
74LS38S 

74LS390 195 

74LS303 lft5 
"■iLK9> 

74LS399 235 

74LS424 2ft5 

7413668 1 75 

74LS670 2 29 

81LS95 I 0ft 

91L336 1 69 

81LS97 1 69 

S1LS98 1 63 

volume phicin6 
call 
toll free 

4069 52.95 

4093 99 

4094 2 95 
4098 229 

4090 225 

14409 1295 

14409 1295 
1441Q 1295 

14412 1295 

14415 695 

14410 495 

4501 



165 



35 
35 



4502 
4603 

4505 9-35 

4506 

4507 

4506 

4510 

4511 

4512 

4515 

4516 

4519 

4520 

4555 

4556 

4566 



96 
3 75 
1 19 

1 19 
13ft 

2 75 
1 45 
139 
I 25 

435 
99 

225 
B0C95 1 50 
80C97 1 25 



MHIDrttr. P.O. 0m 17323 Inrlne. CA 92713 



Refill: 1 3 1 OB E. E dinger. SutiAn C» 92705 
|TI4] 55S-MIJ 

542 m. Trimble. Sin Jon. C A 95131 
|4M| 948-7D1D 



TtflMS V ,,■ - ■■ ■ turn J; 

Hu > - |M A A---- ■ , , 

■n.i ,■■ .-. .„ iVI' ■ 

— ■- r- -|J-J. MO ■ ■ ■ -, rlfV 

• j— j^k vth ■ t* ti .fin. (i - i^ 

.- ■ t \» ■(• Wp- i -^*rf-* t*H"" tin- ■ ," ■ ■ - 



3 
U3 

m 

CD 
03 

ro 



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163 




SALEM! 



BUY 2 BAND PRINTER / TERMINALS 
FOR THE PRICE OF 1! 

You Get 2 GENERAL ELECTRIC (GE) 
TERMINET 1200'a 



Features: 



• RS32 ASCII Input • Fully Fnrmid Typi 
•Up Id 1200 Biud (120 cpi| lor ilmwt 60 Ipm 

• 1?0 Columns at 10 'pitch' •ChsngBibli Print Bind 

• Ultra Reliable *94 Characters | Upper S Lower Cut! 

• 115 VAC SO Hz • MFG'R'i PRICE OVER S5K 



These unique, off-lease and used GE 
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speeds, table-top operation. Continuous print 
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at DOT MATRIX speed!! One unit is fully tested 
and operational, cleaned and ready to use. The 
other is clean and whole but UNTESTED (use as 
a spare or as parts machine). Line Cord & Forms 
Tractor NOT included (available from GE 
direct!) Tractor GE Part No. 44C414730-G02. 

mlenige Only '495.00 » 

(Add S30.00 for Pkg. - Pay Shpg. on Delivery) 



G.E. TERMINET 340 
LINE PRINTER 

These excellent off-lease, used BAND-type Line 
Printers feature: 

•230 to 340 lines per minute. 
•PARALLEL (TTL) Input. 
• 13? Columns. 64 Char. ASCII Set, 
•Includes Stand S Sound Hoodl 
•TESTED & OPERATIONAL 
•Schematics & 1/0 
Dale Included 

Each machine includes 
Print Band. Parallel 
Input I/O Board, 
Schematics & info. 

Each Printer is shipped tested and fully oper- 
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Original Price over S4. 000,00 Most are unused or 

new!! Only *795.00eachh 

(Add. $30.00 for Pkg. - Pay Shpg. on Delivery) 




-•<*: >► 




PARALLEL INPUT 

I/O SELECTRIC* 



The manufacturer put them into storage to de- 
preciate Lhem. Now they are FINALLY 
AVAILABLE!! Removed from working systems. 
these fantastic machines have built-in driverand 
decoder circuitry and lake TTL level, 6-bil 
character plus 4-bit functional input signals. 
Easily driven by most any micro. Use as a 
typewriter (with additional repeat' circuitry) or 
as a KSR/O printer, or both Requires 115, 60Hz 
for typewriter motor 5 VOC forTTLand 24 VDC 
for solenoids. "Table Top' 1 style case. Each 
"Selectric" I/O machine is complete and in 
operational condition. Includes schematics, 
data, case, platen, and ribbon. (Typeelementnot 
included.) 

1/0 SELECTRIC *399.00e;i | 

(Add $20.00 for Pkg. - Pay Shpg. on Delivery) 

Write or Call for our Latest 
BARGAIN-PACKED FLYER! 

•"Selectric" Is in IBM TrBdemark 





*i*f±1=lmim 




G.E. MOV 
Spike Eliminators 

107*9.90 $ 1.29 



MSV 



Cabinet 

Black Mstgl 
2'/i" Xi" X!" High 
lOO/'BS.OO 




Chassis 



(H.D.) 

Fantastic! 



115 V. BLOCK FANS ,f^^^ 

s 6.95 LC 



3" SQ. 
ir FAN 31 




1 Lot of 8 OHM 2%" Speaker! 

Bulk Only IBOu 

>&•' 1DOpca.'39.9S 



Dual Computer Chip Set 

2 CPU A MPU Sytiamt/Duol - 

Clc^i AC.J 

512 XSBiPoloJ-pomMuiK. 

ft lupport 

R S9623 &i Polar Rom 

74L&74VoltCQr>I.Osc. 

7*111 (i) 7*13(2) 

29701 64 X fl Prom 

MC 3601 Moncstoble, Relrig. 

Mullivlbrator (2) 

CA 32*6 Quod 30 MA. OP AMP. 

ewe mpu *9.95 

723 R«a. 

TMS 9901 Prog. KeyboVd In'ivkii: 




2V2" Meters 



0-15 VQC 
0-20 VDC 
0-1 50 VAC 
30-0-30 DCA 
O-l 5 DC A 



S£ 



Any 1 

s 5.95 

lO/'SO.OO 



Tri-Color LEDS 

jx£? Red 'Green reverse volt 
■^^ Yellow A.C. A 

2/ ! 1.50 




Transformer 



'2.39 



J? tf 30V. CT. I ,S AMP. 

lO/'M.M IOO/'2QO.OO 



Mura Cordless Telephone 

Ai-I> 

tt M-l Simplex 
■-■,■ Ih scl-.cm.it 1,:;. 






ITT Power Supply 

Triple or Dual 
±2% tow Ripple 
Choko Of 
+ 12V.7A .13V7A 
or 24V. 7A, 
And 5V. 10A. 

£300.00 0«g. Talolypo C01T 

5" X 5" High X U " s 59 95 




Power Inverter 
12V.to115V. 
450 Watt 

•79.95 



II Warranty Reg OEM $139.^5 



M3.50 



General Instrument 
Varactor Tuners 

•-•„ Your Choice Mi,sumi 

\* IS, VHF-UHF 

'E^ s 22.50 



Voltage Regulators 

»SV. 7805 
•5v. 79M05 
I 6V. 7805 
+ 12V. 7812 

5/ l 5.50 10/ s 9.95 + '5v.TBis 




MOTOROLA PIEZO SPEAKERS 

SPECIAL 

s 6.95 



3W 
RESPONSE 
60 TO 30.000 Hi 



Toko 10.7 MHZ. xtol Filter & Coll 



■54 10 palri 



>».M 



100 pain 'S9.30 



Voltage Regulator 
Boards 

Just hook up 

translormer 

1.29 



12V.p»V. t *V.@ 1.5A 



RFI FILTERS 

2 AMP. HOPKINS 
0F-85O1O SI 95 

6AMP.CORCOM SO QK 
#6EF1 *.?J 



Dip Tantalum Caps 

6.8. 10. 15. 22. 33. 47, (ti S3V J0 
22. SB Si 10V yy^ 

1 5. 3 3. 4.7. 6.6 (n 16V ^Qi 

is j. 2ov *;yt/ 



47 .68. 1.5.2.2, 3.3, 4.7.63(0 35V 
22. 69, 1 fn 50V dipped and solri 



SEND FOR 
FREE 1982 

CATALOG a(lcl 1 ^' : '" ror shl PP |fi y ancl handling ■ 

crtanusai ™ A ;™ 5 H.J. Knapp of Florida, ln£. 

(81 3) 392-0406 send ■> oo 4750 96th St. N. St. Petersburg, Florida 33708 



Piezo Elements 

Fantastic jSP^ 

Murgto Transducer J 



Tiny Inductor 
Assort mont 



from .2flUK 
lol.BlmH. 



10/**. SO 



HfrOt Sinks 
TO 3 WX4-X I 
TOS 10" X J" ,_-, 
TO-3 fr.5 ,r X 3.5" *"" 
TO-220 *L> S9* 



Specialty Chip* 
IM6402 Uarr* W.95 

w:\0\ 25P Bui Driver S3 .50 
N82S133F Prom 2MXS $1 ,59 
41 64-15NL l 8.K- RAM &4K 
MM1702 L 3.«Eprom 

41 1 4 2CQNS. 6/* 1 4. 50 Rom 



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B. G. MICRO 



P. 0. Bex 280298 Dallas, Texas 75228 
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7.1L02-1K.X1 250 at. 

Low Power .35 

S1I4L-3 1KX4 300 n.». 

Low Pow*r 2.TS 8/1730 

HMo1 16P+2KI* • 5I-2M nj. 

CMOS Low Poww 2719 

styla Pin Ool 3 55.00 

TMM2013-2KXB -Sy-MHOS 

200 n.t. ■ 2710 51.1c 

Pin Oul 3/59.95 

3501-5 253X4 - CMOS - Da, a 

Rottnllon 2 Voila - 22 Pin - 200 n.i. 

Typ. 5V Vory Low Powtr . , 1,50 

5514 J-B 1KX4-CMOS Super Low 

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3108-5 1KX9 HMOS 5V 500 NS 

22 Pin 2JS0 



4K STATIC RAMS 
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3 (or 3,95 32 lor 29.95 
VERY LOW POWER! 



DYNAMIC RAM 



1-5 (21 07 B -4 . TMS4O60) 

4KX1 22 Pin S/3.9S 

4027-4KX1-250 n.l. 1.7S 

6-16KX1-200 n->. S/14.95 

4- +Sv 64K ... 12,95 8/79.S5 



m m 



H» both 1 MHZ &nd 2 MHZ TTL — output! 
HirrTHllcilry loilfd — Ullra high sji»b>IHy over 
w.dc |*tnp, rtnyi — orlgtnjMLr CO»ll fl*«f 5*0,M 
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MCGA71A 3720,00 



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AT3'8910-3ound Chip With 6Q 
pige dila miriuil 

DM8131 6 B.1 Uniliud tiui 
Comparatcii' 

B P<n Dtp Snunt 



. 2,99 
3/1.00 



TR1602-UART , 

AYS-IOia 

MG4DZ.45V High speed 
UART-AY5-1013 pin oul 



MC140GL& D to A Converter 
8 EJM 

ApSfitJ D lo A Cofirprlcr 
10 Bit 



1.99 
2,00 
1.79 



EPROM 



1702A2WX61 ui 2.50 

270S 1KX8 4S0 n.t 2.K 

27A0£ 1KXB 3:-0 n.3 3.46 



271fi 2KXB+5V 450 n.t S.S 

(Buy; G«11 FR6E.) 



1771 Single 0*n»lty FDC . 
1791 DoubCc Domily FDC .... 
&D27-CRT CDnlrollcr - 

Progratrnmibl* ■ 24 x Bfl 

&8B45 - Mtforoli (MD46505SP) 

CRT Controller 



14.95 
17.59 



£25123-32X9 Tri Suit Bl polir 

PROM , r . 

S2S129 Tri Slit* B3 Polar Prc-m 



2716-1 2KXB+5* 350 n.i 7.BB 

2732 AKX3 450 n.t. Intel Pin Qui ... 7.95 
2732A-3 4K K8 35D n.t. 

Intel: Pin Out Law Power 10.95 

253J 4KXB450 n.m. T.k Pin Out 9.95 



Z80 2.5 MHZ CPU -1.55 

ZeODMA-OMA Controller 9.»5 

ZB0PIO - Piratril S.9S 

ZflOSIO/O Chan. Sof 1S.9S 

ZSQA-4MHZ CPU 8.9S 

ZB0A SlO/0 19.95 



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{602) 266-9758 (602) 234-3026 
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WhaicfjfB - Pslttif - Surplus 
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MICRO WAVE DOWN 
CONVERTER KIT ihmh iitwi 




: Bd,. 3-MRF901's, 2-MBD 101 S 
1 Thermistor, 1 Choke, 3-Chip Caps, 
$OQ95 1 "F" Connector, 8 Resistors 

**** + Instructions 

PRE-CHRISTMAS SALE 

ON KITS & PARTS 

"Video 7 Sync Enhancer w/ modulator 559.95 

((or video guard tapes| 
'Sinewave (in hoard) $59.95 

(in/out board) $89.95 

'Gated Sync (in board) $59.95 

•UHF Varactor Tuner , $14.95 

"24 V. C.T. XFMR @1.5 ft $3.95 

"7812 or 7815 $.85 

*1310, 1330. 1349, or 1350 

Limit 5 par ■ $1.50 ea. 

12 V. 

CAR 

VACUUM 

yw/assessories 
By KRACO 




$3 95 



8 TRACK 

TAPE DRIVE 

W/110V.A.C. motor 

Track Indicator lights 

12 V. 

Pri-amp 12 V. 

$6 95 


iRl ife^BC*' L ' ' 




DOWN 
CONVERTER 

8-12 V.D.C. or 
12-18V.D.C. 



$14 



95 



DIGITAL 

MULTI-METER 

ASSEMBLY 



£8 



Includes: 

(4) 7 seg. LED displays 
(1)ICL7107|A-DIC) 
(1) -5 V.Reg. ' ^" 

(1)- 5 V.Reg. 
(1) Bridge 
(1) Pwr. Trans. 
Resistors & caps 



$14 95 




NEW PLASTIC CASE 




$155 



Includes 

* 9 V. Batt, Holder 

* Front Bezel 
Excellent for Frequency 

Counter, 



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Satellite — 
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DISCRETE JO MKi ftt - Replaces NE564 udeo demodulator unlfi- 
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go 85 MKr Wide bandmdtli loner C'N reduced Itjrini' Mav be 
remotely tuned 

Kit (A1IZ.-01I1K) 1 134 SS 

• t T(MtZ4lOTI (15595 

TUHEABIE AUDIO DEMODULATOR - Turn from 54 lo 8 ! MHl 
Swilchable 5 KHr LP Filler 1or Canadian buds Tuftiflfi diodes in 
eluded two o! these and a couple op amps required ior steieo 
[MTV) 

Ban Board (MS1-020B) JZ4.95 

two Braids (MBI-OZIB). .. 39.95 

CANADIAN AUDIO DE5CRAMBIER — Tune in most 'cmrpinj:' sub. 
earners and hear whil you've teen misslnl 

Bar: Board (RBJOIGB) 124. 9S 

Kil(R81-010Kt S59.9S 

A I. T (RiT-OlOTI SS»95 

10 -OHMS ADAPTOR - Adapts normal VOMor DYM id measure Irom 
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Bart Board IMSMOOK) MA-'S 

Kit tlie2-lf»KI M9.9S 

A t T [USJ-irjOT) SAS.9S 

MODEM — Belt 103 I30B bpsl compatible Answer /Originate modem 
No acouslic coupler required RS-232 serial I/O 

Bare Bond (RC1-1WB) J2A.95 

KillRIMOrlK) S69 95 

'At TIRH-IOOT) $99-95 

All prices include comptelf and comprehensive doc u mm tat ion. 

postal! and handline COD. orders accepted. Call or write tor 

calaioj. Dealer inquiries invited. 

Digicom Engineering, Inc. 

P. 0. 8ox 1656. Kodiak. Alaska 99S15 

907-486-5118 907-486-6215 

OPEN 10 AM TO 8 PM PST 

DESIGNS IN CONSUMER ELECTRONICS 

DC TO LIGHT 

CIRCLE 92 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



J 



ELECTRONIC 
COMPONENTS 



128 FAGElffi 



MANUFACTURERS OF QUALITY 
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS 

ftattary Clips A Hold*n 

CablftSats Connactori Capacitors 

Displays. LED fui*s Jocks A Plua* 

Knobs Lamp) Por*nt i o m »T » ru 

RF Coils Raloyt R*ttft»ri 

Swttch*! Samiconduct ari Speabr. 
T»lr Equipment Tranjf ormt'l Tool. 

Wir* A Cabl* 
W E HOCK What W* Catalog ! 

• fal« and Order BW)i • ^or, and Mcul 
Op«n *>*m A.DDo H jpfl| Dfdkn Wtl(4i«i 

• TEEMS: C.O.D, V.w r • □ .-,, n.. i.- ;, 

W, (j [■'#.■ C h<I r gp i" 1 1 <f i ■■ nl 

[Q&tn A<e«unli Avflilabl*) II* n* in Siotk 



MOUSER ELECTRONICS 

11413 WOODS1DE AVE SANTEE CA 92071 
PHONE- i7M>a.i9-?I2? T»x- 9)0—331-1175 



CIRCLE 95 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 




MORE GAIN 

THAN A VARACTOR UHF TUNER 



SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEED 

§15.00 

Freq. Hanoi UHF470- 
B89MH; Channels 14 83 
Output Channel 3. 
p ^ nj no n AvaitaWe on rsquKl: Clt 2 or A. 

Modified High Gain Tuner SI 5.00 

1 . Tne first thing we do is change the standard 
diode found in every tuner to a Hot Carrier 
Diode. 

2. Tne tuners output is then measured and 
compared to our computer derived chart 
from which we determine the correct 
value coil (o add across the IF output for 
maximum Pre- Peaked gain. 

3. The tuner is fed a standard 1 0db antenna 
input, and while monitoring the output on 
our Spectrum Analyzer, the tuner is tuned 
to the desired channel and its oscillator is 
offset lor the desired output frequency as 
follows: 

Ch. 2:58Mhz Ch. 3; 63Mhz Ch. 4: 68Mhz 

We call ihir, step peaking because the tuners output look: like 
a peak on our spectrum analyror and ihe highest poinl of Itiat 
peak is actually adjusted lor the desired output. 

4. Finally, we measure the tuners output one 
more time which is again compared to our 
computer derived performance chart to 
ascertain the correct value of the second 
coil which is added to the tuners internal 
connections. 

This procedure was developed by GILCQ and its our computet 
derived performance chare lhal make our tuner Better Trial's 
because almost every tuner pets a ditferenl value coil betore 
it's peaked and then a different value coil alter it's peaked. The 
combinations are endless and the way we determine the values 
is our secret. 



PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS 



Part No, 821 Printed Circuit Board S1 7.00 

1. This Printed Circuit Board uses only one 
jumper, others use 9. 

2. The component layout is screen printed on 
the Component side of the pre- drilled P/C 
Board. 

3. The solder side of the P/C Board is covered 
with High Temperature Solder Resist for 
ease of assembly. 

4. This P/C board was designed to take advan- 
tage of the Gilco High Gain Tuner which 
means its circuitry Is simpler and more 
efficient than those circuits that require 
inferior Varactor Tuners. 



ELECTRONIC PARTS KITS 



Part No. B22 Complete Parts Kit $80.00 

All resistors (30), Polentlometers (1SK, 3-1 OK). Panel Mount 
Polenliometor [1 OK}, Electrolytic Capacitors (S), Ceramic and 
Mylar Disc Capacitors (35), Variable Capacitors (4). All Inter' 
grated Circuits (J), Voltage Regulator. Heal Sink, Diodes (4), IC 
Sockets (4 8 pin, 314 pin). Power Transformer |2AVft A), Coil 
Krl with No. 26 wire (A), Speaker (4"-3 Or.). Standoffs. Coaxial 
cable. All misc. Hardware, etc. All parts are individually 
packaged and labeled. 

All components including the wire, Hardware. Coaxial Cable and 
heat sinks are included in tne parts kit. This means your as- 
sembly time from start to finish Is only A hours. 

Order all 3, B20, B21 , B22 110.00 

Order 5 each, B20, B21 , B22 95.00/set 



ACCESSORIES: AMPLIFIERS 



Part No 

A02 



Kit SI 8.00 



New 2 Stage Low 

Noise 28dh gain RF 

Amplifier Specially 

designed for kit builders 

New 1 Stage Low Kit SI Q.50 

Noise 1 4db gain 

Amplifier 

75-300 OHM matching 

Transformer. 

Coaxial Connectors. . . 

Malt order only. Send chock or money order id: 

GILCO INTERNATIONAL, INC. 

P. 0. Sex Si 1 7, Cecal Btbiei , FL 331 24 

Tel. (305) 823. S39t For COO orders add 1 0% shipping 

and handling or lor orders over £50, add 5%. 

FL reiMenti add 5 1 .; sales lai. 



A03 



AD4 



F59 



$1.00 
.30 



CIRCLE 83 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



O 
O 

-I 

o 

en 
m 
n 

CD 
CD 

to 
185 



30 TUNE 

MELODY 
MICROPROCESSOR 



FEATURES 

* 50 MolC-dlGS 

■ Virlibde Tun* 6p**d 

■ Virlibla Volum« 

■ Dim. Output TO Spaafcaj 

* Aula or Manual Tuna Cmnc-i 

■ Low Power 

* Operaloa By Two 9V Bimrtoi Schnmallc IncEudftd 



IlWUMwi 



APPLICATIONS 

* Electronic Door-cnim»i 

■ Musical Car !"ifirn 

■ E-nUtncfl Warning 

• Music Box 
tic... 

Spec Sii*«t & TypJctl ClfCLtll 




Special Offer $6. 95 TwoFor $13. 00 

Ca. Res. Add 6 Vi Tax Postage & Handling Add SI. 50 



> 



LIMITED QUANTITY 

CLEARANCE 
Electronic Duor-Tunes 



<^ 




These units are 
complete with all 
parts Including 
microprocessor 
described above. 
Minor problems 
require trouble- 
shooting. 



Schematic included, as is— only $1 4,96 
Shipping & Handling,., S 3.00 

500K Lin. Pots: 65'ea, or 4/S2.00 

6Ft. Coax with RCA plugs: 3/S2.00 

Ca. Res. Add 6% Tax Postage 50' 

Check or MO. • Visa & Master Card Accepted 

SRJ INTERNATIONAL CORP. 

1936 Hlllman Avenue 
^ Belmont. Calif. 94002 , 

CIRCLE 94 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



RADIO-ELECTRONICS does not assume any 
the index below. 

Free Information Number Page 

42 AMC Salts... I57 

— ATV Research I70 

Aaron Gavin I58 

54 Abex 31 

67 Active Electronics 1 65 

69 Advance Computer Products 183 

Advance Electronics 20-2 1 .38 

35 Advanced Tool Technology 151 

72 All Electronics 168 

27 William B. Allen Supply 1 5 J 

43 Anders Percision Instrument 

Co., Inc.. 153 

SI Arizona Electronics.*... 185 

25 BBC Melrawatt Goerz 145 

79 B.C. Micro 184 

39 B&K Precision Dynasran Corp 156 

— Bagnall Electronics 160 

Karel Barta 163 

9 Beckman Instruments Cover III 

Bullet Electronics 174 

C&I) Electronics, Ine 176 

— CIE, Cleveland Institute of 

Electronics 34-37 

91 Chancy Electronics 182 

48 Command Productions 154.362 

14 Communications Electronics 2 

28 Components Express.. 84 

3 Compuscrv SO 

82 Computer Products & 

Peripherals Unlimited 184 

29 Concord Electronics 102 

76 Consolidated Electronics, Inc 163 

— Cook's Institute 162 

8 Cooper Croup Cover II 

59 DX Tele-Labs 31 

— Dage Scientific 160 

— DevtroniwOrgan Products 160.170 

— Digatek Corp 164 

92 DigiCom Engineering, tnc 185 

63 IHgi-Key Corp 161 

74 Dokay ...174 

EduCalc 32 

98 Electronic Rainbow 42 

41 Electronic Specialists, Inc ..157 



responsibility for errors that may appear in 




QUALITY ELECTRONICS SINCE 1957 

THIS MONTH'S SPECIALS! 



741 1 



Fisher Pierce 
115 Volt 10 Amp 
PHOTO-ELECTRIC 
CONTROL 

-Ideal lor Indoor A. ouldc-o 1 
hcnireaclivc projeds 
■Consists 01 an SPST rally, controlled 
by B '* ' d.n. CdS pnolo otoclr.c Mil 
-Fully enclosed in 3 v. "dia. x 2 V." pleatrc module 
*1QA, 1O0OW, 1BO0VA ^. Af% 

*Hubbftll 3-eond. iwlil lock mild plus $4.49 



o 
O 

01 

H 
O 

LU 



Q. 

< 

cc 
186 



MfcroSwilch 
70-Key 

COMPUTER 
KEYBOARD 





■Prlmirin 

itsvo 



TRANSFORMERS 

S1H S3VO I* 

7343. 15V 500mA. ?V & I A . 

71»» 1SVTC ff 3A 

71B7 12VTC 150mA 

711ft 1 2VTC it 50mA. 5V Iff 2MmA 

71 ft* 25VTC « 3A 

7.71 3Sv«4*,1]»VGTO2A.iaV«!00nul 
7117 ISV trt JA, «V # JA. 13VCT i, SA 
71 «« I3UJHA.36VC.7* 1A.I0VB4A ... 
BS.02 30V a SA 



•Top^uallly data enlry type Keyboard 

* Assembled wrcornplele on-board circu.lry 

•Includes Blphatielic. numeric £ com pule 

command keycap legends ***** nn 

'Mourns on 12 W K 3" Ctrs Sj 2 2 . O O 

71BS 



G.E 12V 1Ah 

NICKEL-CAD 

BATTERY 



DUAL OUTLET 
SO CFM BLOWER 



hargeabte. "*-j^_ i*^^ 



•Ful 

rechargeable 
■Consisls of (en 1 Jv lATi tub G 
CftHS connected in icnn 

•fx 1-7rtT 

7i7i 



$6.49 



TANK BATTLE 

TV GAME BOARD ' 

•2B-p.n DIPurrGontsral Insl rumenls 
AY-3-S700-I lank ban legume chip ■Mjjl-ffi 
and board 

■Chip c.npatiMnj'S. 2 Individually controlled tx- 
pledfflg tanks. 3 speeds, motcr £ axo-OHiOn 
toundB. ort-Kfotr. tccrinQ. S more jt O A A 





Fa eco US J 1 sen e 5. all metal 

asse-mRly 

DluI 2-IVrJ" x Vlf2"(MilleS5 

deliver m CFM ft 3200 RPM each 
ffiO H P. VAC 'P'.erma-rv prOfecled malor, 

1,5V AC ft MHi,0.7JA 
■9" X B" k *'&". Inl*:a 2-7-3"d'a 
716* 



$9.98 



includes 5V," lluoreacanl bulb, 
mounlino llxiura w/tranaformar, 
In.llne ON/OFF aw Itch 1 B 1t. 
co«J. »PFC.wlired A ready to u» 



71 »1 



$9.49 



Lambda 

VOLTAGE 

REGULATORS 




EgzcaaggSEHa 



T101 lZViTr3A,3QWaEls.TO-3ca9A 11.7ft 
T300 12^ « 5A. iOW«»5.T03c»» » r » 



&tf&t 



REJECT - 

"GAS 

SNIFFERS' 

•HoQ&riat ip««*L: Q.C ra|*ci£ 
cr i-g.f.aiiy dsinjf'ec lo Hnsg 
Ionic gaases & aourrd alarm 

-EachfcGnfdzlViVx 5^" 

" 8 « . $5.88 



Sanyo Impact-Type 
DIGITAL PRINTER 

•Solenoid a ci lira I eel dlflil aeleti 

A auici tape advaoca 
* : 2-column 'or nut prmls digits 

i symool t 
•Haquirna 4 i2v DC Pi SODmA 

T-SvOCo-r 100mA (aolanoidtf 
•4-1IT4" K 4-3/B" k !-1M" a* j 

73ao $14.44 





COMMUNICATIONS 
METER 



•ld«aF lor Him. C.B. & '«iatcKd if^iicaiions 
•CalltafitM SWR, WATTS 4 MODULATIOK Kales 
•SOOttvA movamanl, 2000 C+im coil ■>* aa 
•For pang] mounl in 2 3 .*' dia hola 44i99 
T4Q3 




16-18 Del Cjirmino ST.. RE-10 FREE 
Wsketield. MA 01S80 "C*a , n Mass or Ouraido 

Mm Otter $10 Add 15" '. Rhipfwritj Mas& Res Add 9% Sales T*3 



OflDEft BY MAIL OR CALL: 

Joll 800-343-3086 

FREE ln Mass or ouraido US Can 61 7*245-3828 



Phone Hours Mon EhnjSflT 3 30 am lo&^Opm EST 



Electronic Technologj Today 90 

— Electronics Training 152 

46 Enterprise Development 159 

65 Elco Electronics 169 

47 Etroniie 158 

— Fordhnm Radio 162 

20,62 Formula International 44.177 

— Calaxy Electronics 168 

S3 Giico International, Inc , 135 

40 Gladstone Elect ronics 1 59 

Global TV Electronics 164 

34 Godbout Electronics 59 

Grantham College or Engineering.. 155 

26 Hal Communications Corp. 24 

85 Hal-Tronix 170 

21,15 Heath 26.78-79 

22 The Heath Group 28 

33 Hickak Electrical Instruments 147 

90 Hitech Electronics 174 

I5ET/NE5DA 134 

88 Information Unlimited 170 

50 International Crystal.. 157 

61 JDR, Microdcvices 178.179,180-181 

J&W Electronics 160 

60 Jameco Electronics 172-173 

57 Jensen Tools, Inc 31 

97 Klkusui International Corp I 

78 H.J. Knapp, 184 

LT Sound 168 

McGce's Radio 168 

McGraw-Hill Book Co 136-139 

— Mem otech Corp II 

36 MicroManagement Systems, Inc.. 158 
Microtenna Associates 160 

30 Mikos Inc 77 

Monarchy Engineering, Inc 176 

87 Mountain West Alarm 162 

95 Mouser Electronics 185 

7 Multitcch Electronics, Inc 96 

NRI Schools.. 16-19 

NTS Schools 118-121 

32 Neptune, Communications, Inc 147 

Netronics 58.151 

12 New Tone 29 

19 Non Linear Systems 5 

16 North American Soar. 27 

10 O.K. Machine & Tool 25 

75 Omnitron Electronics ..176 

18 PC Guide 103 

80 P.P.G. Electronics Co. Inc 182 

55 Pacific One Corp. , 31 

37 Pac-Tcc Corp 159 

45 Paia Electronics 145 

Philips ECG 13 

1 1 Philips Test 3c 

Measuring Instruments 23 

56 Phipps & Bird 31 

77 Poly Paks 186 

5 Frotccto Enterprises 72 

31 Quest 94 

17,— RCA 95.152- 153 

4,66 Radio Shack 52,171 

64 Ramsey Electronics 167 

93 SCR Electronics, Inc 182 

68 SJB Distributors, Inc 175 

51 SMP. Inc 31 

94 SRJ International 186 

96 H.W. Sams 63-71 

Satellite TV 164 

Simple Simon Electronics 1 17 

Sinclair Research Ltd 8-9 

73 Sintec Co 170 

70 Solid State Sales 164 

23 Sony Video 22 

84 Spartan Electronics 182 

24 A.W. Sperry 30 

71 Stavls Electronics, Inc 166 

Suntronics Co., Inc. 166 

49 TNW Corp 134 

13 Tab Books 15 

Tektroni* 7 

38 Triton MktR. Corp ,...155 

53 L'nsar 31 

52 Video Control 31 

58 Video Mods ' 31 

2 VfcMffi. Co 33 

86 Wersi Electronics 163 

44 Zeniog Scientific 134 

Zenith Radio Co. Cover IV 



CIRCLE 77 ON FREE INFORMATION CAHD 



22 Megohm 
Input Impedance 



12,000 Hour Continuous 
Battery Life 



Audible Continuity 
On -Oft Switch 

True RMS Select Switch 

lorac only or ac+dc 



Insta-Ohms' Visual _ 

Continuity Indicator" 



n-Circuit Resistance 
Measurement 

20n Low Resistance 
with Zero Adjustment 




■10 Amp ac/dc 

1500Vdc/1000Vrms 

Overload and 

440 Vdc/Vrms Resistance 



Temperature Probe Input 
C-20°CtO +1265° CI 



In-Circust Diode/ 
Transistor Test Function 



Introducing the TECH 360 
DMM. Never has it been 
so easy to do so much for 

so little. 



Beckman's TECH 360 bench/ 
portable DMM puts unmatched 
capability and convenience at your 
fingertips. 

You can select from 8 functions 
and 31 ranges with one turn of the 
single selector switch. 

On or off the bench, you can 
accurately measure all complex 
waveforms with True RMS AC func 
tions. Extend resistance measure- 
ment to 1/100 ohm resolution. Read 
temperatures from — 20° C to 
1265°C. Perform continuity checks 




quickly, with audible and visible 
indications. Measure up to 10 amps 
without adding special adaptors. 
AH with 0.1% basic Vdc accuracy. 

12,000 hour battery life 

Designed for ultimate ease of 
operation, the TECH 360 delivers 
12,000 hours continuous service (up 
to 4 years of normal use) from stan- 
dard heavy-duty batteries. You'll 
never have to search for power out- 
lets or contend with ground loop 
errors. The expense of rechargeable 
battery packs 
is eliminated. 



The TECH 360 is available 
for just $289 (U.S. only), including 
batteries. The companion TECH 
350 (without RMS and temperature 
measuring capability) is priced 
at $229. 

For information on the com- 
plete line of Beckman DMMs and 
accessories, call your local distrib- 
utor today. For the one nearest you 
call: (714) 993-8803 or write 
Beckman Instruments, Inc., Electro - 
Products Group, 210 South Ranger 
Street, Brea, California 92621. 



Convenient storage and multiple viewing angles 
are featured in the new line of Beckman bench/ 
portable DMMs. 

CIRCLE 9 ON FREE INFORMATION CARD 



BECKMAN 





TgNITH 



The quality goes in befo(e the name goes Oni 

Zenith Radio Corporation/ Service, Parts & Accessories Division/ 11000 Seymour Avenue/ Franklin Park, Illinois 60131